Learn Na'vi > Audio

Looking for recordings in Na'vi :)

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Tirea Aean:

--- Quote from: Wilamina on February 21, 2017, 07:28:29 am ---Hi Na'vi speakers,

--- End quote ---

Kaltxì :)


--- Quote ---first of all, I really appreciate the hard work you're putting into learning a new language. I've studied a few myself, also small ones where it can be challenging to find fellow speakers.
--- End quote ---

It's been very fun for me. Finding fellow speakers of Na'vi is easiest online. We are spread pretty far. Tho sometimes many of us attend meetups.


--- Quote ---I am a Master's student at the University of Amsterdam and I am researching the aesthetic effect of languages we don't understand. My case-study will be several constructed languages, mostly popular ones and I will conduct interview with participants to gain an understanding of how they listen to languages they don't understand and which words they would use to describe these languages. Eventually, it all comes down to an aesthetic dimension of languages.
--- End quote ---

Interesting! :D Would you like to publish your results of this on the forums when you're done? Researchers have come here in the past and have done this. :) It's really cool to see research done on the language or the language community.


--- Quote ---Are one or two of you able to provide me with a short recording, 4 minutes, of Na'vi. Could be you reciting a small text (I think the one that is translated into most constructed languages is the Babel one) or/and attempt to speak freely. Would be nice to have one audio file of a text and one of free speech. Participants in my study will be asked to listen to the recording you provided and then discuss with me what the language sounds like to them.

Anyone interested? As I told you, I really appreciate your hard work and I am trying really hard to be able to pay you for this but life is tough in Academia (especially the humanities)... but I am honestly trying and will make sure you receive a little gift!  :)) We could also meet up and chat if you're based in the Netherlands or Germany (Cologne/Dusseldorf area).
--- End quote ---

4 minutes may be the longest single audio sample ever attempted. Though I can say that well over 4 minutes can be compiled from individual recordings.

I will think about what text I could possibly read that could take 4 minutes to read. I'm thinking maybe something in our Na'vi literature board, probably this right here: https://forum.learnnavi.org/pamrel-ninavi-niaw/vur-teri-tsamsiyu-alu-perseusi/



--- Quote from: Aka`ula on February 21, 2017, 07:42:33 am ---Kaltxì! If you are wanting to hear people's opinion of how the language sounds, to those that have never heard it, maybe you also want to read about the creation of the language. James Cameron wanted it to have a certain sound, and the language to be unlike any other in big similarity. Paul Frommer gave James 3 choices for a kind of language iirc.

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--- Quote from: Wilamina on February 21, 2017, 08:22:44 am ---Kaltxi!
interesting, thanks! any specific books/articles you could recommend?

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Concerning the creation of the language, Frommer has attended many interviews in 2010 and we have learned much from the audio recordings and text records of these interviews. Many of such exist on YouTube and random news blog sites that can be found on Google by searching "Paul Frommer na'vi avatar"

One of the most informative concerning the creation of the language is this bit of an interview here: http://usoproject.blogspot.com/2009/11/interview-with-paul-frommer-alien.html


--- Quote from: Wilamina on February 21, 2017, 08:22:44 am ---Na'vi phonetics are of course somehow based on natural languages, after all humans have to be able to produce them.. however, the combination is unique so would be interesting to see what languages speakers of different languages associate na'vi with when listening to it. what is the first language that comes to mind?  :)
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This is a great question that I remember being talked about in an interview.  Here is a quote I found:


--- Quote from: https://dornsife.usc.edu/news/stories/725/the-science-of-language-navi-that-is/ ---“The sound system has to be all nailed down first, so that there is consistency in the language,” he explained. Early on he provided Cameron with three “sound palettes” for Na’vi. “Cameron passed on the first two, but liked the third very much,” he said.

Na’vi is composed of 20 consonants, seven vowels and four diphthongs. If Na’vi sounds to the listener as if it was derived from no particular language family, then Frommer is pleased. His goal was for this language to sound utterly new. He admits that there are Persian influences in the grammar from the year he spent teaching in Iran. There may also be some words reminiscent of Bahasa Malaysia from a year in Malaysia as a Peace Corps volunteer.

 “When you create a language, you experience the joy of rolling sounds around in your mouth, hearing unusual sounds, playing with the sounds and structural properties of language — it’s a process that took about six months for the basics,” he said. His linguistic passion and enthusiasm is undeniable as he describes the nuts and bolts of developing Na’vi.

Cameron developed 30 of the first words of the language, including the word Na’vi. Most of the words he created were names of characters and places. According to Frommer, Camer-on had just returned from New Zealand, which may be a reason there are several words that may sound Polynesian in origin.
--- End quote ---

More:


--- Quote from: http://learnnavi.org/tag/paul-frommer/page/2/ ---Its creator says some of Cameron’s original words had “a vaguely Polynesian feel”. Others have suggested that it sounds like German or Japanese.

“It certainly borrows various grammatical structures, sounds, that exist in other languages – but what I hope is that the combination in this language is unique,” says Professor Frommer.
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I hope this has been helpful. I'll see what I can do about that Recording. :D

Wilamina:
Kaltxì!  :)

thanks a lot for your helpful comments! I will of course let you guys know about the results of my research. :)

Thanks for the file "Txon Eywa’evengä". It's only 1 minute but I think definitely something I can work with. To my ears, this recording sounds pretty foreign. What I mean by that is that I can't tell immediately detect where the speaker is from (the r might hint on an English native speaker but that could just be 'cause that's what I expect). Do you agree? Or can any of you hear an obvious accent in his way of speaking na'vi?
What I found fascinating as well, is that I hear the "ejectives" as click-sound, as they are found in South African languages, but these are indeed different ways of producing sounds.

If anyone wants to provide a longer recording, that would still be helpful!

I will listen and read through the videos and texts you guys sent me now!  :)

Tìtstewan:
Tìng Mikyun fte Tslivam: Listening Comprehension #1 (File is in the content folder of the Na'viteri-HTML: Listening-Comp-1-2010-7-24.mp3)
is 2 minutes long :)


EDIT: It's only for me or all the audio stuff at Na'viteri disapeared? ???

Tirea Aean:

--- Quote from: Wilamina on February 21, 2017, 01:20:30 pm ---Kaltxì!  :)

thanks a lot for your helpful comments! I will of course let you guys know about the results of my research. :)

--- End quote ---

Txantsan!


--- Quote ---Thanks for the file "Txon Eywa’evengä". It's only 1 minute but I think definitely something I can work with. To my ears, this recording sounds pretty foreign. What I mean by that is that I can't tell immediately detect where the speaker is from (the r might hint on an English native speaker but that could just be 'cause that's what I expect). Do you agree? Or can any of you hear an obvious accent in his way of speaking na'vi?
--- End quote ---

Yeah, my recording of Txon Eywa'evengä is full of traces of my en_US accent. All of my older recordings are like this. :-[

I can generally pick up on accents of anyone attempting to speak Na'vi. Few and far between (if there are any at all) are people who speak Na'vi purely according to exact official IPA assignments to each phoneme.


--- Quote ---What I found fascinating as well, is that I hear the "ejectives" as click-sound, as they are found in South African languages, but these are indeed different ways of producing sounds.
--- End quote ---

They are supposed to be outward ejection of pressurized mouth-air. My mic was not great at all in that rec! :o


--- Quote ---If anyone wants to provide a longer recording, that would still be helpful!

I will listen and read through the videos and texts you guys sent me now!  :)

--- End quote ---


--- Quote from: Tìtstewan on February 21, 2017, 01:32:30 pm ---Tìng Mikyun fte Tslivam: Listening Comprehension #1 (File is in the content folder of the Na'viteri-HTML: Listening-Comp-1-2010-7-24.mp3)
is 2 minutes long :)

EDIT: It's only for me or all the audio stuff at Na'viteri disapeared? ???
--- End quote ---

It's all still there for me. Either way, glad you backed it all up! hrh

http://naviteri.org/2010/07/ting-mikyun-fte-tslivam-listening-comprehension-1-3/ works for me. There is still that tiny flashplayer play button. Direct link is still at:
http://naviteri.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Listening-Comp-1-2010-7-24.mp3

There is also this:

http://naviteri.org/2015/09/tskxekengtsyip-a-mikyunfpi-a-little-listening-exercise-2/

Also, see this most historic content:

http://masempul.org/upxare-niinglisi/
  -> FLASH: http://masempul.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/pam3.swf

and

http://masempul.org/2010/04/trr-%E2%80%99rrtaya-2/
  -> MP3: http://masempul.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Upxare-fpi-Srr-Rrtaya.mp3

Both decently long messages.

Plumps:
Kaltxì – hello :)


--- Quote from: Wilamina on February 21, 2017, 07:28:29 am ---I am a Master's student at the University of Amsterdam and I am researching the aesthetic effect of languages we don't understand. My case-study will be several constructed languages, mostly popular ones and I will conduct interview with participants to gain an understanding of how they listen to languages they don't understand and which words they would use to describe these languages. Eventually, it all comes down to an aesthetic dimension of languages.
--- End quote ---

Interesting. Basically what James Cameron told Frommer that Na’vi should sound nice. Very subjective of course. What sounds harsh for one speaker might sound beautiful or intriguing to the next.

I’m quite interested in your results :)



--- Quote from: Wilamina on February 21, 2017, 07:28:29 am ---Are one or two of you able to provide me with a short recording, 4 minutes, of Na'vi. Could be you reciting a small text (I think the one that is translated into most constructed languages is the Babel one) or/and attempt to speak freely. Would be nice to have one audio file of a text and one of free speech. Participants in my study will be asked to listen to the recording you provided and then discuss with me what the language sounds like to them.
--- End quote ---

Apart from the files and links already given, it’s quite hard to find recordings of people speaking freely. First of all it requires a certain level of fluency that I think a lot of speakers feel they don’t have yet. I tend to disagree – fluency or free speech is not shown by flawless use of grammar or a 2-min monologue without any uhm’s or self-correction. For me it’s the efford to convey what you mean in another language and your chat partner to understand you. And I know a lot of people have this stage of ‘fluency’ (for lack of a better word).

For some reason a lot of people are hesitant to just try and speak :)

If we go for a real life situation I am reminded of a recording of Tirea and Prrton from the very beginning. I don’t know if Tirea still has it somewhere ;)



--- Quote from: Wilamina on February 21, 2017, 07:28:29 am ---Anyone interested? As I told you, I really appreciate your hard work and I am trying really hard to be able to pay you for this but life is tough in Academia (especially the humanities)... but I am honestly trying and will make sure you receive a little gift!  :)) We could also meet up and chat if you're based in the Netherlands or Germany (Cologne/Dusseldorf area).
--- End quote ---

Unfortunately I’m also not in that area.
But maybe Wllìm would be ready to meet with you. He is from the Netherlands (but I don’t know where exactly) – I had a few longer talks with him entirely in Na’vi :)

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