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The Ten Commandments

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Vawmataw:
I'm going to act like a conservative 'Murican and translate the ten commandments. I also added my references. It's surprising that it's only been mentioned but never translated.
Even though I'm against the cultural assimilation, it contains some good values.
I have to say there are several versions depending on the traditions. I'm following the Vatican one (catholic) and a bit of Exodus 20:2–17. But it doesn't really vary between the Catholic and the Protestant bibles, does it?

Vomuna tìkxìm
'Awvea tìkxim: Oe lu Eywa, ngeyä Sa'nok, ulte tìhawnu si rey'engur.
I am the Lord thy God
Muvea tìkxìm: Ke lu kea lahea Sa'nok a lu nawm, swok sì meoauniaea.
Thou shalt have no other gods before me
Pxeyvea tìkxìm: Tstxori peyä fìfya nga leioae sayi fpi meuia sì tìme'em.
Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain
Tsìvea tìkxìm: Swok layu 'awvea trr kintrrä. Ngal ke tswaya' tsat ulte tsayurokx.
Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy.
Mrrvea tìkxìm: Ngari sa'nokur sì sempulur layu meuia.
Honor thy mother and thy father.
Puvea tìkxìm: Kawtu ke tayerkup taweyka nga. Tìreyru nga leioae sayi.
Thou shalt not kill.
Kivea tìkxìm: Muntxa a eo Eywa layen 'awlo ulte ke 'ayia.
Thou shalt not commit adultery.
Volvea tìkxìm: Nga ke mayunge zumit lapeyä nìfya'o a ke muiä.
Thou shalt not steal.
Volawvea tìkxìm: Ngal ke paylltxe aylì'ut atsleng wä tuteo.
Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor.
Vomuvea tìkxìm: Lapori kelkut, muntxatut, ioangit fu keng zumit ngal ke 'ayanla.
Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's house; thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's wife, or his male servant, or his female servant, or his ox, or his donkey, or anything that is thy neighbor's.
Possible alternative if you prefer a less Na'vified and more faithful version:
'Awvea tìkxim: Oe lu Yawä, ngeyä Sempul a ngar heykum ftu Itsyìptì.
Muvea tìkxìm: Ke lu kea lahea Sempul a lu nawm, swok sì meoauniaea.
[...]
Tsìvea tìkxìm: Swok layu Trr Yawä(yä?). Ngal ke tswaya' tsat, tsayurokx ulte por kite'e sayi.
[...]
Kivea tìkxìm: Ngari txo livu muntxatu, muntxa ke sayi hu tute alahe.
[...]

Tirea Aean:
This makes me wonder if the Na'vi have similar (but unwritten of course) commandments. Most likely having to do with their traditional views and values of respect for nature and love for all living things and the environment to include other Na'vi people.

I'm also against the mixing or substituting or comparison of Eywa and the God/gods of Earth. 

And I agree that most of these commandments are great values -- like don't lie, steal, or murder.

There may be nits I overlooked or didn't correct. I just wanted to pop in and get updates on this. :)

Sent from my LG-H811 using Tapatalk

Vawmataw:
I fully understand that Yahweh isn't Eywa but you have two different cultures and spitirualities. In a human perspective, Yawä should be used, while in a Na'vi perspective this is completely alien and only recognised because someone told them. Therefore, each culture will take the most important figure. I bet I made a mistake by choosing the Na'vi perspective for a human thing. By the way, the Yawä alternative is there. :)

Toliman:
Good translation.


--- Quote from: Tirea Aean on August 05, 2016, 09:36:21 am ---This makes me wonder if the Na'vi have similar (but unwritten of course) commandments. Most likely having to do with their traditional views and values of respect for nature and love for all living things and the environment to include other Na'vi people.

--- End quote ---
I think that it would be possible.

`Eylan Ayfalulukanä:
Eltur tìtxen si. It surprises me that no translation of this pivotally important part of scripture hasn't been attempted before.

I am with Tirea Aean that there should not be a mixing of value systems in a translation that is intended for devotional reading or in a translation one might use to 'evangelize' the Na'vi (There was some interesting discussion about this early on). But that said, I think that Vamataw's take on how this might apply to the Na'vi culture is certainly appropriate. The who topic of the idea of a set of 'laws', or a 'code of honor' or several other forms it could take is certainly worthy of discussion. It may also have more or less 'laws' (eight, perhaps) because of the Na'vi number system. It also may not address all the areas addressed by the Ten Commandments, or conversely, it may address some areas where there is no parallel in the Ten Commandments. This discussion belongs more properly in 'Na'vi Customs and Culture', as it would be an extremely important part of their culture. Although there is no harm done in speculating about this topic, I bet that it is ultimately Cameronian territory.

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