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Glowing tanhì?

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Ertew:

--- Quote ---You never shine if You don't glow.
~ Smash Mouth - All Star
--- End quote ---

--- Quote ---Engineer start from draft, then research, plan and finally act.
--- End quote ---


As mentioned earlier on forum I preparing for cosplay. One of problems to solve are tanhì (bioluminescent dots).
In human case real bioluminescent may be dangerous thus We need to find different way. This topic is intended to collect all possible solutions and chose best one. Basically only there are four main ways to have tanhì:

* Reflective - white paint, silver paint or true reflective material (only for photos with flash).
* Glowing - everything that emit light.
* Projection on skin (3D mapping, etc), not very practical in real live.
* Photo manipulation (photo shop, gimp, etc) - the best results on internet.
Reflective is the simplest solution, just grab white marker and paint. I'll chose that way when other fails. Glowing sounds best for me, but still searching for optimal solution, there are so many ideas to use...

* Fluorescent - grab invisible (UV) light and emit visible (blue, yellow, white, ...) light.
All You need is fluorescent pigment and UV light source. UV pigment can be used as a paint (see  Jane’s guide) or tattoo ink (see Eana Unil's posts)
 
* Phosphorescent - store light energy and release it later.
Same but with phosphorescent pigment. What's the different? Phosphorescent pigment may glow few hours in complete darkness. Sadly, light intense are very poor and dots should be big to notice. Basically city lights can kill phosphorescent effect without much effort.
 
* Chemiluminescent - chemical reaction that emit light, see lightning bugs.
Glowing solution are available as glowing stick, used for fishing. Sadly available sticks are way to big. And thrust me, You shouldn't open that stick and use mixture as paint. Glowing solution are caustic and may be toxic. It's not the best substance to play with.
 
* Electroluminescent 1 - phosphor plus high voltage = light.
EL wire is very nice light source. With outer diameter of 2mm can emit light at any direction (need opaque cover to stop unwanted light between dots). Sadly, driving voltage is as high as 100V. Not danger when insulated but not nice when insulation fail. And personally I'll never try to put that around whole my sweaty body. Btw, not compatible with body painting. Full costume required, face costume may be problematic.
 
* Electroluminescent 2 - LED (light emitting diode) or actually LOL (Lot of LEDs).
Another solution not compatible with body painting. Full costume required, face costume may be problematic. LEDs are small, energy efficient (in some applications too much efficient) but need a lot effort to solder them all to fine wires. First tests with regular LED tape already happened but that tape are rigid and not elastic at all. I have problems with that tape on my hands and cannot imagine wiring that all over my body/costume. Only idea that looks promising are to solder each LED to thin copper wires and sew that wires to the fabric. Lot of work but may give nice effect.
 
* Electroluminescent 3 - any light source and fiber optics.
Similar to two solutions above. This need separate light source and fiber optics cables to transfer light to individual dots. Sounds more rigid than hand made soldering but at least better than LED tape.

"Lot of LEDs" is the solution I trying to use. Sadly no glowing dots over my face because I don't have any idea how to glue LEDs and hide wires. Maybe LED implants or fiber optics implant within next decade? On the other hand, white LED at 20mA will be noticeable even through layer of fabric under powerful street lamps. 1mA per LED sounds reasonable for darker environment like cinema, where I plan to perform my cosplay. With good battery and proper dimmer I may be the star of each event, spreading more light than regular 15W incandescent bulb  8)

Do You have any other solutions?

Toliman:

--- Quote from: Ertew on December 27, 2017, 06:44:41 pm ---1. Reflective - white paint, silver paint or true reflective material (only for photos with flash).
2. Glowing - everything that emit light.
3. Projection on skin (3D mapping, etc), not very practical in real live.
4. Photo manipulation (photo shop, gimp, etc) - the best results on internet.

--- End quote ---
I really would like try to realize second way - glowing, despite that is not easy to realization. But it can look really impressive and spectacular, if you will be able to find right way. And if it will be not successful, you can use reflective paints/materials, as you write.



--- Quote from: Ertew on December 27, 2017, 06:44:41 pm ---Glowing sounds best for me, but still searching for optimal solution, there are so many ideas to use...

Spoiler1. Fluorescent - grab invisible (UV) light and emit visible (blue, yellow, white, ...) light.
All You need is fluorescent pigment and UV light source. UV pigment can be used as a paint (see  Jane’s guide) or tattoo ink (see Eana Unil's posts)
 
2. Phosphorescent - store light energy and release it later.
Same but with phosphorescent pigment. What's the different? Phosphorescent pigment may glow few hours in complete darkness. Sadly, light intense are very poor and dots should be big to notice. Basically city lights can kill phosphorescent effect without much effort.
 
3. Chemiluminescent - chemical reaction that emit light, see lightning bugs.
Glowing solution are available as glowing stick, used for fishing. Sadly available sticks are way to big. And thrust me, You shouldn't open that stick and use mixture as paint. Glowing solution are caustic and may be toxic. It's not the best substance to play with.
 
4. Electroluminescent 1 - phosphor plus high voltage = light.
EL wire is very nice light source. With outer diameter of 2mm can emit light at any direction (need opaque cover to stop unwanted light between dots). Sadly, driving voltage is as high as 100V. Not danger when insulated but not nice when insulation fail. And personally I'll never try to put that around whole my sweaty body. Btw, not compatible with body painting. Full costume required, face costume may be problematic.
 
5. Electroluminescent 2 - LED (light emitting diode) or actually LOL (Lot of LEDs).
Another solution not compatible with body painting. Full costume required, face costume may be problematic. LEDs are small, energy efficient (in some applications too much efficient) but need a lot effort to solder them all to fine wires. First tests with regular LED tape already happened but that tape are rigid and not elastic at all. I have problems with that tape on my hands and cannot imagine wiring that all over my body/costume. Only idea that looks promising are to solder each LED to thin copper wires and sew that wires to the fabric. Lot of work but may give nice effect.
 
6. Electroluminescent 3 - any light source and fiber optics.
Similar to two solutions above. This need separate light source and fiber optics cables to transfer light to individual dots. Sounds more rigid than hand made soldering but at least better than LED tape.
--- End quote ---
Chemiluminiscent sounds interesting, but as you write - really don't try to use it.
I would try use some elecroluminescent or fluorescent - maybe fluorescent would be my choice, because I have not such experiences with electronic as you.



--- Quote from: Ertew on December 27, 2017, 06:44:41 pm ---In human case real bioluminescent may be dangerous thus We need to find different way.

--- End quote ---
I completelly agree - use nothing like this:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goi%C3%A2nia_accident
 ;D ;)


--- Quote from: Ertew on December 27, 2017, 06:44:41 pm ---Do You have any other solutions?

--- End quote ---
I am affraid that you already mentioned all possible reasonable ways :-\

TEAgaming2154:
I personally would go with fluorescent. Small UV LEDs can be easily found at any electronic parts retailer or just as easily online. You just need a way to conceal a battery compartment, the wires, and the actual diodes.

Ertew:
Thanks Toliman, I forgot about radioactive light sources. As dangerous as real bioluminescent by glowing bacteria.

TEA: I need space for store documents, phone, wallet and keys but don't have slaves to hold my items and follow me ;) There are few options to store my items: backpack, hip bag or kidney bag. Any of them allows me to store battery pack. Just need to figure how to pass wires through costume fabric.
Sadly bag/backpack limits me to play only as avatar driver, not real Na'vi. But who really cares about that details.
Alternatively I can hide batteries along the entire length of the tail, same way as Jane MacMillan add extra weight to plastic tube.




BTW, Two new solutions found!
1. LEDs on fabric tape, by adafruit.
Spoiler- Expensive and not stretchy but at least flexible. Made of fabric plus two stainless steel wires. 20 LEDs per 1m, comes in 1.5m string.

2. LEDs already soldered to copper wire, by adafruit.
Spoiler- I may fold wire between each dot and sew individual dots to my costume. That extra amount of wire should give me enough elasticity. Wires and sewing may be visible through fabric but hope they don't show up.

`Eylan Ayfalulukanä:
Jane McMillian's outfit, the last I saw it, used fluorescent sanhì, with UV emitters on her bow. It was effective, as long as she had her bow with her. Fluorescent and phosphorescent sanhi are the type I have most frequently seen.

LEDs are a very interesting solution, and perhaps the most convincing. However, to do a really good job of it will take some serious work. What you want to use are SMD Leds, or tiny LEDs with beam leads that are designed to mount to a flat surface. SMD LEDs are available in sizes that coreate convincing tanhì. You will have to use a suit with these, and stretch will be a challenge. You also need to use fine, flexible wire, and solder it directly to the LEDs. IMHO, hooking 4 or 5 LEDs in series will be the best compromise between buildability and applied voltage. This will be, in my experience with surface mount parts, a daunting challenge, and may only be good for one wear.

The challenge with a fiber optic solution is that the light comes out the end of the fiber. To get the fibers to lay flat against the skin and still emit light straight out will take some sort of terminal that will act as the tanhì spot. The terminal will bend the light at a right angle, and be the attach point to the skin (or be held in place by the almost obligatory suit.

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