Author Topic: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU  (Read 28786 times)

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Offline Ateyo Te Syaksyuk

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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #480 on: March 01, 2015, 11:48:18 am »
480) Ateyo’s eyes opened before the sunlight could penetrate the leafy canopy of Zongsteng Alor.  She snuggled closer to Tai, who was still sleeping next to her in the double-sized sleep-leaf.  She was thinking of the tasks ahead.  Her mind was filled with ideas of the upcoming hunt for Awaiei seeds.  It involved a little danger, which could be circumvented by some training and practice.  She wondered if Pamlala had ever built a shield, or a knife for that matter.  And did anyone else know how to prepare the glue that strengthens the straps?  Which of these aysahik had stalking and hunting skills? Would there be enough scales left over from the sea creature they had hunted so many years before?  Each one would make a small shield.  Should they use the hide of ‘angstìk instead?  A sting from an Awaiei dart could cause the skin to to become inflamed for several days, along with a fever.  She would have to designate aysahik to apply poultices.  Was there enough salve?  Could they make more?  She wondered if she had bitten off more than she could chew with this task.  She tried to sleep but her dreams were of failure and disarray. 
   Tai must have sensed Ateyo’s anxiousness even as she slept.  She pulled the small Na’vi into a deep embrace murmuring, “Mawey livu, oeyä pupa tokx.” Ateyo buried herself in the loving arms. “Pupa Tokx”, she thought. Short body. Tai had called her that the first time she had visited here at Zongsteng Alor.  She thought of that meeting and the realization that someone was actually attracted to her.  She dreamed of flying down from the tree tops to claim her muntxate.
   The next time she awakened, it was daybreak and Tai was kissing her and singing, “Tìng Pom * Tìng Pom * Tìng Pom!”  Ateyo only laughed.  It was an old joke, Tai’s attempt at creating a sentence. Two verbs: Tìng, to give and Pom, to kiss. This never failed to make them both giggle to realize the awkwardness and sweetness of the attempt. Many other couples, Na’vi and Ayhumon, alike, had adopted the morning greeting between each other. 
   Ateyo awakened a third time to realize that Tai had left the sleep-leaf! She wondered how long she had slept.
   “Rewon lefpom, Oeyä eylan! Kllza’u ulte yom!” (Good morning, my friends.  Come down and eat!) Tsahik Meykir and Eyktan Ikxeru were calling from below.
Ateyo realized that she had missed the early morning hunt.  No one had awakened her so there must have been a sufficient number of hunters.

   As they all descended from their sleeping places, children ran up and presented them with hot towels to clean their faces and hands.  That was a nice touch!  Ateyo thought she would like to incorporate that custom at the Slotted Cave.  She had visited enough ayolo’ (clans) to realize that not all had the same customs.  She gratefully accepted a cup of the stimulating tea which Tsahik Meykir presented to each person.  She thought it might be necessary to acquire a large clay pot such as this from the potters of Olo’Vawma ‘Ora (Clan Dark Lake).  Every thing she looked at, every habit, every custom, she wondered if it might be appropriate for the new clan.  She was anxious to speak with the other aysahik to learn what they foresaw of the new clan.
   Tai found her and sat next to her.  Also came Kapteyn Henderson and Toyrey’ìtan, and their adopted Na’vi orfan, Tanìs, who had sought out her old friend Pxepxi, who was hand in hand with Kofi.  As the wutzo progressed more and more people came to join their segment of the circle. Much of the conversation centered upon the formation of Olo’Samoana.  It was too overwhelming for Ateyo.  The cobwebs were still clearing from her head!  At any rate, it seemed that a huge crowd would be traveling with them to help them get established. 

Offline Ateyo Te Syaksyuk

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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #481 on: March 15, 2015, 06:40:03 pm »
481)~   It felt good to have the wind under their wings and tugging at their hair.  Ateyo was happy to see Zina and Twiti up ahead.  In all the tumult of last night’s discussions, she wasn’t sure whether those two would remain at Zongsteng Alor or join their new clan.  However, that didn’t stop Ateyo from imagining them both as teachers of bow making and arrowhead making.  Twiti had teased her that morning about missing the hunt!  Zina especially had lots of leadership skills and often organized hunting parties.  Ateyo determined that she would ask them both to join the new clan. 
   It was hard to stay close to Tai.  All the members of the Hidden Base wanted to fly near her.  Their aymuntxate were each flying behind them on their ikrans.   Ateyo and Atanvi dropped back to allow them that privilege.  But she kept an eye on Pxepxi riding behind Tai.  She wondered how long it would be before she had the child and how long before she would claim an ikran at Iknimaya.
   Which thought lead her to more consternation.  She and Tai would have to prepare many people for that great event. 
   She wondered who Kofi was flying behind.  She had merely to follow Pxepxi’s glance.  Kofi was flying behind one of his young friends from Zongsteng Alor.  She remembered something about a yerik’s eye and how he had grossed-out the Hidden Base woman, Txianna.  She couldn’t remember the fellow’s name, but that was him, undoubtedly.  She wondered if he would be joining them, too.
   She tried not to grin because the wind was making her lips flap.
   The odd slapping sound of rotor wings were heard above.  The two lefngapa ikrans, the Dragons, quickly bypassed the ayikran riders, though a safe distance above them. The sun was now nearly overhead, and the glint of the ocean was perceived upon the horizon.  The ayikran began to cry out in delight and urged their riders to allow them their heads.  In an instant, Ateyo knew what was going to happen.  Sure enough, Tai turned in her saddle and threw her kiss.  Atanvi cried out in frustration, knowing that he could never hope to keep pace with the larger ikrans.  The larger ikrans pulled away from the others, knowing they would arrive only a while afterward.  Ateyo almost laughed when Tai stood in her saddle, her kxetse slapping Pxepxi in the face as they hurried away.

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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #482 on: March 15, 2015, 06:41:39 pm »
482)~Ateyo peered ahead through all the brightly colored wings.  She could feel Atanvi’s excitement at nearing their destination.  She could see the cloud of sand and dust as the Two Dragons were landing near the Comm Shack.   But Atanvi drew her attention to the ayikran escort.  No sooner had the Ikran Riders of the Eastern Sea clan, left the landing field, than they turned to the incoming flight of ayikran. 
   It was clear that the Escort Flight was unhappy at getting dusted by the Lefngapa Meikran, but their intention of getting clean sent a thrill through the entire group.  They whirled around in front of the incoming group and returned by way of the steep cliff face.  But even knowing the intention never quite prepares the skin for the sudden dousing as the ayikran flew through the chilly ocean spray, high above the base of the cliff!
      It seemed to the riders that their ikrans were laughing with joy.  It was difficult to separate one’s joy with that of the bonded creature.  Tsaheylu made the shared experience immediate and unmistakable. 

   Ateyo had seen Tai speaking with Sharon and Eyktan Ikxeru before Atanvi had landed. Ateyo was pleased to see her muntxate among those who were moving toward the incoming ayikran.  Aysahik were laughing as they dismounted.  They hugged each other joyously, and there was soon, a mass of hugging bodies.  It seemed that the ayikran were instrumental in drawing the aysahik together. The joy was infectious.  The ayeyktan sought out their aymuntxate.  But no one was drawn away from the group.  Instead the mass of hugging bodies kept growing and growing, until all the people were ranged along the tiny spit of land where the Txon’ong Ceremony was always held.
      “Ayllrrtok sì nìtram, ayoeng, irayo seiei, Oeyä Nawma Sa’nok!”  (For the smiles and the happiness, we thank you, My Great Mother.)  Ateyo was nearly dancing as she offered these words.
   “May our laughter and joy serve as our gratefulness to You!”  Her arms were upraised and everyone did likewise, ululating and making war cries, which were not war-like in the least.  With those few words and gestures, the “ceremony” was completed. 
   Eyktan Atumopin, (whose name literally means Painted Red), yet who was not currently painted red, announced that a hunt would be needed to feed the people.  Sharon approached the Clan Leader with a suggestion:
   “Ma Nawma Eyktan Atumopin! I could take your hunters in a Metal Ikran to a hunting ground farther away from the usual hunting grounds, which are probably depleted by now, from feeding so many people!” Ateyo and Tai were on hand to help with the translation. And Atumopin brightened at the idea.
   “Fmok akosman!” (Wonderful suggestion.) “Rey’engìri sngolum oe.” (About the Balance of Life I have been worried.) Goot ey-di-a!” (Sharon realized that Atomupin was saying “Good Idea” and missed a beat, before responding.)
   “Lu nìswey fwa sop nemfa Samson, lefgapa ikran ahì’ì.”  (It is best that we travel within a Samson, small Metal Ikran.) 
   Eyktan Atumopin nodded, and grinned her approval of Sharon’s use of the language in a full sentence , and replied.
   “Ma Lamu’ite sì oe silyuneiu ngahu.” (Lamu’ite and I would love to hunt with you.) “Polpxay tsamsiyu ziva’u?” (How many hunters can come?)
  “Pukapa taronyu nì’aw. ” Six hunters, only.)
   Atumopin turned and appointed a hunter, with instructions to return to camp and bring Tsko Swisaw (Bow and arrow) for herself and Lamu’ite, and one for Pamela. Tai and Taifa’ were standing close at hand. So she chose them.
    “Oe nìteng! Oe nìteng!” (Me too!, me too!) shouted Ateyo, jumping up and down with excitement.
 
    Introductions were made, and though Sharon was bad at remembering names, the hunter’s name was easy to remember.  He introduced himself as Lu-ke Pen, which translates as Without Clothes, in Na’vi.  He grinned when Pamela turned purple with embarrassment as she translated his name in her head.
   “Luke! My name is Luke Penn, slä ayfo nìwotx syaw Lu-ke Penn oer!” (but they all call me Lu-ke Penn) Sharon was laughing when she was interrupted.
  “Oel omum tsengit alu swey taron,” (I know a place which is best to hunt), mentioned Eyktan Atumopin, anxious to get hunting.
   “Srane, Ma Eyktan. Zene nari sivi oeyä kunsìp lesngä’i .” (Yes my leader, but I must look at my gunship first.)Sharon did a walk-around inspection of the Samson, and was surprised at how well maintained it was.  This gave Tai a moment to explain about her Hidden Base near Olo’Zongsteng Alor, and the chopper crew who had deserted the RDA with Trudy Chacon.
    Pamela pulled the red intake covers from the chopper, stowed them, and took her place in the jump seat, behind Sharon and John.   Sharon turned on the Auto Igniters, moved the throttles to Engine Start position, started the Boost Pumps, and hit the start switches.  John read off the checklist and Sharon responded when each item was accomplished.  The other Na’vi exchanged glances of approval at the methodical process.  The engines spooled up with a whine of turbines.  The huge machine lifted gently off the ground, swirling dust and sand up and away.
   “YAWO!” (air launch!) shouted Pamela, forgetting to mute her microphone.
   “YAWO!” shouted the others, excited to be flying.  They all remained standing by the open cargo door, poised as if riding an ikran, bows in hand.  Eyktan Atumopin directed Sharon towards the hunting grounds which she had previously explored.  Although it was suggested that they all hunt from the sky, Sharon explained that the rotor wash would scare off the animals before they could get close enough for a shot.  Before long, Atumopin pointed out a watering hole with many yerik at the edge.  Sharon nodded and circled around, careful not to spook the creatures. 


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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #483 on: March 30, 2015, 04:31:41 pm »

483)~ The whirling rotor blades slowed to a stop.  Eyktan Atumopin waited patiently, while Sharon and John counted off the Shut-Down Procedure checklist. 
She motioned for the others to wait, but Ateyo had already bailed out and the others had followed.  The grasses thrashed wildly about them.  They waited with aytewng flapping in the wind. Tai and Taifa’ exchanged glances and Tai cuffed Ateyo gently on the ear with a warning scoff.   The engines came to full stop, Sharon and John followed out behind Atumopin, who gave Ateyo a withering glance for Getting Down before she gave the order.
They followed Eyktan Atumopin into a meadow, sheltered from the sight of the ayyerik with a tall cliff behind them.
   “If we all had ayikran, we could have landed on the ridge without scaring the ayyerik,” murmured Sharon wistfully.  She felt a hand rest upon her shoulder.  It was Tai who trailed close behind.
   “When you are ready!” said Tai with a half grin, happy to be using the phrase on someone else, which had been spoken to her.
   Atumopin, was within earshot, even though their voices were low.  She smiled to herself, thinking;
   “Ye'rìn fya’oìri taronyur ayoengil fayNa’vit amip, zene sngä’ì kerar!”  (Soon, concerning the path of the hunter, we to these new Na’vi, must begin to teach.)
Yet from the corner of her eye, Atumopin caught sight of Tai, signalling to stop and take cover.  Movement which was down and to the left revealed that the ayyerik were leaving their watering hole and approaching the path which was situated along the bottom of the ridge, of which the aytaronyu were already halfway down.  Breathlessly, each person froze and took cover behind the various rocks, shrubs and trees, waiting.  When the ayyerik arrived at the bottom of the ridge, they would turn either left or right.  A plan of attack could not be chosen until the ayyerik made their choice.
  “Whom of you will choose himself to feed the people?” thought Pamela, remembering the words to the Hunter’s Song.


   *Terìran ayoe ayngane/ We are walking your way                                                                                                         
  Zera'u/ We are coming
  Rerol ayoe ayngane/ We are singing your way
  Ha ftxey/ So choose
  Ayngakip  'awa tuteti fxivey./ Choose one among you
  Pesu Na'viru yomtayìng?/ Who will feed the People?
  Pesu Na'viru yomtayìng?/ Who will feed the People?
*Avatar: A Confidential Report on the Biological Social History of Pandora
by Maria Wilhelm, Dirk Mathison


   Using her peripheral vision, as her Grandpa had taught her long ago, she could watch the ayyerik and Eyktan Atumopin’s hand signals, as well.  She and Grandpa had put meat on the table in those last years, before she had qualified to study at the the Academy.  Holding her bowstring at the ready was tougher to maintain with this rudimentary bow than with a compound, such as Ateyo’s.  Ateyo’s! She had probably been gifted with it from Tai.  Her muscles were beginning to tremble.  Atumopin’s hand was raised. And DROPPED!
   Each arrow was loosed almost simultaneously, and seven yerik dropped simultaneously.  Pamela quelled the moment of elation when the arrow had found its mark.  Taking a life was not a thing to be celebrated.  Solemnly, she walked down the pathway toward the ayyerik.  Their companions had been startled  and moved away to watch in astonishment.  It made Pamela even more conscious of the sacrifice of these animals, to have the rest of the herd lingering nearby.  She knelt by her target, and couldn’t help the tears that dripped off her nose when she recited the words of Thanks.
   “ Oel ngati kameie ma tsmukan” (I see you brother)
   “Ulte ngaru seiyi irayo!”(and thank you!)
   “Ngari hu Eywa saleu tire” (Your spirit goes with Eywa)
   “Tokx `i`awn slu Na’viyä hapxi!” (your body stays behind to become part of the people!)
   She felt a hand upon her shoulder and knew that Atumopin had heard.
“Nga lu alakxsi, Ma Tsmuke.” (You are ready, Sister) Atumopin didn’t wait for a response but had crossed to where Sharon and John were retrieving their arrows.  She had them recite the words again, as a matter of formality.  Atumopin began to think of the ceremony which would officially recognize these people into her clan. Well, sort of her clan. But now she had to plan on getting these ayyerik back to the clan.  Sharon was quick to offer suggestions.
  “Ma Eyktan Atumopin!  Oe tìving tìfmok.  Oel tsun zamivunge lefngapa ikran oeyä kllkem. Tsakrr ayoeng tsun kur nìwotx fo äo lefngapa ikran oeyä, fa sä’o letäftxu.” (I give suggestion. I can bring my metal ikran down to the ground Then we can hang them from below my metal ikran by means of a woven-tool {net})
  Atumopin considered her words, which were spoken in that awkward sentence structure of the Star People, and nodded her head.  She couldn’t quite understand the entire concept but had confidence in Sharon as a problem solver.
  “Kosmana tìmok! Sleyku fìu!”  (Wonderful suggestion! Cause it to become!)
   Pamela watched Sharon and John retreat up ridgeline, holding their me- Sko Twizaw.  Atumopin gathered the hunters to her and explained, as best she could, what was going to happen.  Luckily, Tai and Taifa’ knew exactly what would occur and were not surprised when Sharon brought the Samson into a low hover in the clearing.  She suspended the aircraft with the heavy cargo net touching the ground.  Tai and Taifa’ were well familiar with the drill and released half the net to the ground.  Tai, Taifa’ and Atumopin loaded the carcasses onto the net, with Pamela and Ateyo helping as much as possible.  The cargo net was reattached, and Tai gave Sharon a thumbs-up, so that Sharon could secure the Release Lock switch from inside the cockpit.  Ateyo joyfully imitated the Thumb’s-Up gesture. Sharon then eased the Samson just in front of the cargo net full of yerik, hovering a foot above the ground. 
   Pamela and Ateyo were given a leg up.  It caused Pamela to wonder why Ateyo was of such small stature.  They sat next to each other and Ateyo began to chatter good naturedly when Pamela remarked about her compound bow.  Pamela wanted dearly, to ask Ateyo about her stature, but decided against it, not wanting to appear offensive.  She doubted if she could have gotten a word in edgewise, and gave the conversation, or monologue, her full attention.
But Ateyo stopped chattering when Atumopin spoke.
   “Sä’o letäftxu atxur.” (Strong net) Eyktan Atumopin said admiringly. She was at first skeptical of the capability of the net to carry seven full yerik carcasses.  She did not protest for fear of being perceived as backwards and unsophisticated.  These Star People had many fine things to share.  She was glad that they were not greedy and self-serving, as were the Sky-People before them.
   The  air above the tree canopy was warm and moist, but fresher than upon the ground.  Pamela took in a big lungful and realized that doing so would have likely killed her in her other tokx. She glanced at Ateyo and slapped her ribs to demonstrate her pleasure at breathing.  Ateyo only laughed and imitated her gesture. Then she offered her hand and helped Pamela to her feet.  Their ayikran were flying beside them, as Sharon slowly flew back to the Eastern Sea.  Atanvi screeched in joy when he recognized his rider within.  Ateyo had heard of the famous leap of Jake Sully from his ikran to the Toruk.  She wondered if she dared to imitate him.  But Atanvi never got into position, so the temptation was dismissed.
   The rest of the trip was short enough that she didn’t have time to explain her mischievous desire to Pamlala. All she said was,
   “Oe rangel tsnì oe tsun swivayon ikranfa!” (I wish that I could fly in the manner of ikran!) Pamlala nodded enthusiastically.
   “Nìteng oe!” (The same, me!)
   The Two exchanged wide grins, but Pamela’s brain was spinning as she brewed an idea. 
   Sharon maneuvered the Samson so that the net was touching the ground at the edge of the landing field.  The tide was high and a spray of water was shooting up the crevasse, where Na’vi were lined up on the bridge.  Atumopin noted with satisfaction that the Na’vi could also construct an object that could support the weight of Many.  Triumphantly, she leapt to the ground from the cargo door, before the Samson had touched ground.
The Na’vi came forward, eager to claim the yerik in preparation for the daytime meal.  Tai and Taifa’ were disconnecting the cargo net and directing the removal of the yerik.
   Pamela saw the young hunter who had loaned her his bow and arrow.
  “Tìsarìri sko swizaw ngayä oe irayo seiyi.” (For the use of your  bow and arrow, I thank you very much.)
   “Kehe.  Rä’ä  plltxe, san: NGAYA, :sìk.  Plltxe san: Ngeyä :sìk. (No. Don’t say, quote: NGAYA :unquote. Say; quote: Ngeyä :unquote.
   “San: Ngeyä :sìk.”
   “Eyawr! Ngeyä sko swizaw. Oel ngati tìng fìstxeli. (Correct! Your bow and arrow. I give to you this gift.)
   Pamela, still processing the sentence, again pro-offered the Bow and Arrow, saying,
   “Ngeyä sko swizaw?” (Your bow and arrow)
The man was enjoying this too much.  “Kehe. Ngeyä sko swizaw. Stxeli.”
   Ateyo noticed her puzzlement.  “Stxeli ral GIFT. Means GIFT.  But you must say Ngeyä, not Ngaya!”
  Pamela, understanding the lesson and the gift, began to thank the hunter profusely.  Quickly, she removed something from her bag, opened it and demonstrated its use by cutting a sliver from the leather of her tewng, loincloth.
   “Stxeli. Ngeyä tstal! YOUR knife!”
   The hunter was dumbfounded.  Everyone had seen the lefngapa tstal that the Star People carried.  Ateyo had even envied the one which she had seen used by Tael Karbaki, when he was prying shells from the seashore rocks.  And this one was easily given away!  She tried to tuck away her jealousy and congratulate the recipient.  She realized, though, that her own bow was a matter of some jealousy.  She tapped Pamela’s elbow and guided her to the place where the yerik were laid to be skinned.
   “Set, ngar zene mun’i yer’ik luke tstal lefngapa.  Ngar zene sar tstal letskxe!” (Now you must cut without metal knife.  Now you must use stone knife!”  She found two likely stones and banged off a good spawl with a sharp edge.  And quickly made a second to be used as knives, and began to demonstrate the adequacy of a non-sophisticated implement.  She was satisfied that Pamela seemed duly impressed.

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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #484 on: April 11, 2015, 10:57:56 am »
484)~ Ateyo helped the young men deliver the butchered meat to the ayemyu, those who cook.  She thought she recognized the young men, but couldn’t place them.  She also noticed that they each had five fingers and toes.  These were the friends of Pxepxi and Kofi from S’ralta’s starship!  She would have to learn their names.  One was Evan.  She remembered his name because it sounded like ‘EWAN, young. 
   They trooped down to the cooking fire, which was situated near the natural amphitheatre where the communal fire was. 
   “Ontu si, Ma Ateyo”, said the cook known as Kxukxi.  Ateyo was left to imagine that Ontu Si, was like Nari Si. Do Nose instead Do Eye.  She grinned and made a great gesture of inhaling the aroma of a sauce which was presented on a stirring implement. Ateyo grinned again and gave Kxukxi a thumbs-up gesture.  But she was curious
  “Srake, ngeyä tstxo lu Kxukx, fu Kxuke?”  (Yes/No. your name is Swallow, or Safe?) 
   “Kehe! Kxukxi! Lì’u ‘em ral Cook, mì Inglìsì. Ulte lì’u ‘emyu ral Cookie, fyao alu syaw oe. Kxukxi!” (No, Kxukxi.  The word ‘em means Cook in English. And the word ‘emyu means Cookie, the manner in which I am called. Kxukxi!) Ateyo laughed and repeated the name, thinking that a good cook made food that was safe to swallow.  Georgia Barnes had long ago learned that explaining that cook and Cook was both verb and Noun was beyond her capability in Na’vi.  Nor did she try to explain that Cookie was also a sweet treat which one bakes.  But soon she was busy with her task of preparing food.
   Ateyo learned that the language of some people with five fingers was almost hard to distinguish from those with four fingers!
   The other advantage of helping at the cookfire was that is was easy to get food to serve to ayeyktan. Leaders.  She knew many and knew right where to find them!  With the help of ‘Ewan Evan and his two friends, and Kofi and Pxepxi, who were with them, they wrapped pieces of roasted meat into heavy leaves from the ‘utu mauti tree.  She smiled to herself to think of her courtship with Tai, which included the presentation of the Push Fruit.  The cook fires of other clans, were likewise situated around the natural amphitheater.  They greeted people whom they recognized.  They passed the gathering of her new clans’ people, promising to return. 
   Alekxsi, who had been so close to Mo’at, was found sitting away from the others, despondent and sad.
   “Ma Alekxsi!  Oe omum fwa lu nga keftko  tìterkupìri Moatä, (I understand this thing which you are unhappy about the death of Mo’at) slä rä’ä tung säpi slu tstu txe’lan ngeyä.  (But don’t allow yourself to become closed in your heart.) Kllkem ngeyä txìm ftu ngeyä vulur akeftko ulte fte srung sivi ayoengur. (Get down your butt from your Branch of Sadness and help us!)
  This last phrase was so unexpected that Alexsi couldn’t help but smile.  She allowed Ateyo to help her down from her Sad Branch, which was actually a rock,
and wiped her eyes with a soft leaf that Ateyo offered.  They embraced affectionately before joining the others.  Ateyo thought that tonight would be a good time to visit the Laughing Sea Creatures in the Lagoon.
   They trooped across the rope bridge to the landing field and found Atumopin seated in the open cargo door of the big Samson, which had earlier brought the yerik.  Atumopin had apparently just arrived and had seated herself between Sharon and Pamlala.  Ateyo wondered where Tai was at the moment.
   Somehow, they had passed each other through the crowd.  Tai was coming across the bridge and was also bringing food for Eyktan Atumopin and Pamlala.
After all the greetings were made, Eyktan Atumopin said,
  “Nìtram lu oe ayngatìri zola’u fìtsenge ‘awsìteng.  Ayuìri ayoengur lawk zene.” (Happy am I that you came here together. Of many things we must confer.)
She took a bite of meat and chewed thoughtfully. 
   “Ma Srron.  Nga lu eyktan atam, ‘uìri, am’aluke oer. Slä, nga lu eyktan Mipa Na’viru, nì’aw. Txo nga new sleyku nìNa’vi, ulte spaw oe fwa fì’u lu eyawr, to aynga zene sleyku Iknimaya.  Fte slu Na’vi, zene nga ftey ikran, ulte nìteng, pumil zene ftey ngat.  Nìftxan, oel ayngati kivar.   (Sharon.  You are a sufficient leader.  Of this thing, I have no doubt. But, you are a leader of New Na’vi, only.  If you want  to become Na’vi more and more, and I believe that this is true, then you must achieve Iknimaya.  To that extent, I will teach you.) 
   “Yer’ìn, 'ärìp ngeyä olo’.  Kivä oe ngahu fte srung sivi ngati sko eyktan Na’viyä. 
Tsakrr ayoengit tskxekeng sivi ru, ngar ulte ngeyä olo’ ‘awsìteng.)
Soon you must move your new clan.  I will go with you to help you in your role as leader of Na’vi.  Then we will begin to train for Iknimaya, you and your clan together.
   With that, she tore off a chunk of meat with her teeth and nodded emphatically.
 



   Ateyo walked up to Sharon’s side, tapped her politely on the elbow and asked,
“Ma S’rron! You from me need help with words?”
Almost simultaneously, both Sharon and Eyktan Atumopin, responded. Sharon saying,
   “Ma Nawma Ateyo! Srung sivi, rutxe!” (O Great Ateyo, Help please!)
However, Eyktan Atumopin gave a slight smile, and said,
   “Ma Ateyotsyip! Ma S’rron lu nerume nìno. Oel slivam nìwotx poeti. Slä srung sivi tsaker srung new moer!” (My Little Ateyo, Sharon is learning thoroughly. I can understand her completely. But help us when we need help!)
   Ateyo was pleased to be of service, and listened attentively.
   Sharon looked at Ateyo, and just as Tai, and Taifa walked up, said, “Ma Ateyo, trray ayoeng ‘ayärìp ne ayoeyä mipa kelku”. (Ateyo, tomorrow we will move to our new home). “Atumopin mimok fìtrr, ayoeng syor ulte trray ayoeng tìkangkem, ulte ftia”. (Atumopin has just suggested today we relax, and tomorrow we work, and study ).
   Tai then asked Sharon, “ Does this mean that we get to share the slotted cave with the Undersea Renegades?”
Sharon nibbled on a piece of fruit offered to her by a young Na’vi, and said with a grin, “ At least until we either grow gills, or build and deploy another undersea research station”.
Taifa asked, “ Do we have the materials, and equipment here to do that? You people must really love to study, and be with, the marine animals to spend all of your time down there.”
John was quick to clarify how these Marine Biologists did what they did. “ Oh we didn’t spend all of our time on the research station.  All of us taught at the University of Hawai’i. We were only under the water for Spring, Summer, and Winter breaks, the rest of the time, we had apartments on dry land, and taught at the University.”
Pamela’s enthusiasm took control of her speech, by saying,
   “We could do the same thing here! We could spend perhaps a month on station, under water, about twice a year. The rest of the time, we would be up on dry land.”
   Sharon looked at Atumopin, and said, “ Fpi ‘awa tìpawm; ‘Awlo ayoe kolä ne Iknimaya, slivu ayoengä ayikran lekye’ung krra ayoe lu mìso ‘awa vospxì “? (For the sake of one question; Once we have gone to iknìmaya, is it possible that our ikrans will become crazy when we are away a month?)
   Atumopin thought for a minute and said,
   “Ke omum fì’u ‘eykefu ayoe fyape. Ngian fpìl oe tsnì suteo Sanhì-sìpä lu ikranä aymaktoyu. Ngal zene pxivam ayoet.” (I don’t know that thing will cause them to feel in which manner. However, I think that there are some people from the Starship who are ikran riders. You must ask them.)
   While Sharon was translating in her head, Eyktan Atumopin and Ateyo exchanged glances. Ateyo then gave a nod to Pxepxi’s friend, named ‘Evan, giving him permission to speak with the Elders. Unfortunately, he had just taken a big bite of meat and needed to finish chewing before he could speak. He managed to murmer,
“'Awa swawtsyìp. Oel yerom. Kxukx oel tivung ngar!” (Just a tiny moment. I am eating. Allow me to swallow!)
   They all laughed as tried to assure him to take his time as he chewed frantically. Ateyo offered him a drink of water from the gourd canteen which she was carrying.
“Oeru lu ikran, ulte po lu lefpom akrrä tamätxaw oe. Ngian, pol lu keftxko ulte txopu seri fwa oel tserwa’ poti. (I have an ikran and he was joyous when I returned. However, he is upset and is afraid that I will forget him!)
   “I guess that would be the same for any pet that you might have had on Earth, be it Horse, Dog, or Cockatoo,” commented John.
   Everyone chuckled at that report, and Sharon said, “I guess that I would have to let my Ikran know that I would be gone for a while before I broke tsaheylu for the last time before going underwater for a month”.
   Tai slapped Sharon on the shoulder, and said, “Remember, FIRST you have to win the ikran”.
   Sharon replied, “It will happen, when I am ready,” winking at Atumopin.

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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #485 on: April 22, 2015, 04:38:09 am »

484)~ Ateyo helped the young men deliver the butchered meat to the ayemyu, those who cook.  She thought she recognized the young men, but couldn’t place them.  She also noticed that they each had five fingers and toes.  These were the friends of Pxepxi and Kofi from S’ralta’s starship!  She would have to learn their names.  One was Evan.  She remembered his name because it sounded like ‘EVAN, boy. 
   They trooped down to the cooking fire, which was situated near the natural amphitheatre where the communal fire was. 
   “Ontu si, Ma Ateyo”, said the cook known as Kxukxi.   She grinned and made a great gesture of inhaling the aroma of a sauce which was presented on a stirring implement. Ateyo grinned again and gave Kxukxi a thumbs-up gesture.  But she was curious
  “Srake, ngeyä tstxo lu Kxukx, fu Kxuke?”  (Yes/No. your name is Swallow, or Safe?) 
   “Kehe! Kxukxi! Lì’u ‘em ral Cook, mì Inglìsì. Ulte lì’u ‘emyu ral Cookie, fyao alu syaw oe. Kxukxi!” (No, Kxukxi.  The word ‘em means Cook in English. And the word ‘emyu means Cookie, the manner in which I am called. Kxukxi!) Ateyo laughed and repeated the name, thinking that a good cook made food that was safe to swallow.  Georgia Barnes had long ago learned that explaining that cook and Cook was both verb and Noun was beyond her capability in Na’vi.  Nor did she try to explain that Cookie was also a sweet treat which one bakes.  But soon she was busy with her task of preparing food.
   
   The other advantage of helping at the cookfire was that is was easy to get food to serve to ayeyktan. Leaders.  She knew Many and knew right where to find them!  With the help of ‘Ewan Evan and his two friends, and Kofi and Pxepxi, who were with them, they wrapped pieces of roasted meat into heavy leaves from the ‘utu mauti tree.  She smiled to herself to think of her courtship with Tai, which included the presentation of the Push Fruit.  The cook fires of other clans, were likewise situated around the natural amphitheater.  They greeted people whom they recognized.  They passed the gathering of her new clans Olo’ Samoan, promising to return. 
   Alekxsi, who had been so close to Mo’at, was found sitting away from the others, despondent and sad.
   “Ma Alekxsi!  Oel omum fwa ngati lu keftko  tìterkupìri Moatä, (I understand this thing which you are unhappy about the death of Mo’at) slä rä’ä tung säpi slu tstu txe’lan ngeyä.  (But don’t allow yourself to become closed in your heart.) Kllkem ngeyä txìm ftu ngeyä vulur akeftko ulte fte srung sivi ayoengur. (Get down your butt from your Branch of Sadness and help us!)
  This last phrase was so unexpected that Alexsi couldn’t help but smile.  She allowed Ateyo to help her down from her Sad Branch, which was actually a rock,
and wiped her eyes with a soft leaf that Ateyo offered.  They embraced affectionately before joining the others.  Ateyo thought that tonight would be a good time to visit the Laughing Sea Creatures in the Lagoon.
   They trooped across the rope bridge to the landing field and found Atumopin seated in the open cargo door of the big Samson, which had earlier brought the yerik.  Atumopin had apparently just arrived and had seated herself between Sharon and Pamlala.  Ateyo wondered where Tai was at the moment.
   Somehow, they had passed each other through the crowd.  Tai was coming across the bridge and was also bringing food for Eyktan Atumopin and Pamlala.
After all the greetings were made, Eyktan Atumopin said,
  “Nìtram lu oe ayngatìri zola’u fìtsenge ‘awsìteng.  Ayuìri ayoengur lawk zene.” (Happy am I that you came here together. Of many things we must confer.)
She took a bite of meat and chewed thoughtfully. 
   “Ma Srron.  Nga lu eyktan atam, ‘uìri, am’aluke oer. Slä, nga lu eyktan Mipa Na’viru, nì’aw. Txo nga new sleyku nìNa’vi, ulte spaw oe fwa fì’u lu eyawr, to aynga zene sleyku Iknimaya.  Fte slu Na’vi, zene nga ftey ikran, ulte nìteng, pumil zene ftey ngat.  Nìftxan, oel ayngati kivar.   (Sharon.  You are a sufficient leader.  Of this thing, I have no doubt. But, you are a leader of New Na’vi, only.  If you want  to become Na’vi more and more, and I believe that this is true, then you must achieve Iknimaya.  To that extent, I will teach you.) 
   “Yer’ìn, 'ayärìp ngeyä olo’.  Kivä oe ngahu fte srung sivi ngati sko eyktan Na’viyä.  Tsakrr ayoengit tskxekeng sivi , ngar ulte ngeyä olo’ ‘awsìteng.)
(Soon you must move your new clan.  I will go with you to help you in your role as leader of Na’vi.  Then we will begin to train for Iknimaya, you and your clan together.)
   With that, she tore off a chunk of meat with her teeth and nodded emphatically.
 



   Ateyo walked up to Sharon’s side, tapped her politely on the elbow and asked,
“Ma S’rron! You from me need help with words?”
Almost simultaneously, both Sharon and Eyktan Atumopin, responded. Sharon saying,
   “Ma Nawma Ateyo! Srung sivi, rutxe!” (O Great Ateyo, Help please!)
However, Eyktan Atumopin gave a slight smile, and said,
   “Ma Ateyotsyip! Ma S’rron lu nerume nìno. Oel slivam nìwotx poeti. Slä srung sivi tsaker srung new moer!” (My Little Ateyo, Sharon is learning thoroughly. I can understand her completely. But help us when we need help!)
   Ateyo was pleased to be of service, and listened attentively.
   Sharon looked at Ateyo, and just as Tai, and Taifa walked up, said, “Ma Ateyo, trray ayoeng ‘ayärìp ne ayoeyä mipa kelku”. (Ateyo, tomorrow we will move to our new home). “Atumopin mimok fìtrr, ayoeng syor ulte trray ayoeng tìkangkem, ulte ftia”. (Atumopin has just suggested today we relax, and tomorrow we work, and study ).
   Tai then asked Sharon, “Does this mean that we get to share the slotted cave with the Undersea Renegades?”
  Sharon nibbled on a piece of fruit offered to her by a young Na’vi, and said with a grin, “ At least until we either grow gills, or build and deploy another undersea research station”.
   Taifa asked, “ Do we have the materials, and equipment here to do that? You people must really love to study, and be with, the marine animals to spend all of your time down there.”
   John was quick to clarify how these Marine Biologists did what they did. “Oh we didn’t spend all of our time on the research station.  All of us taught at the University of Hawai’i. We were only under the water for Spring, Summer, and Winter breaks, the rest of the time, we had apartments on dry land, and taught at the University.”
Pamela’s enthusiasm took control of her speech, by saying,
   “We could do the same thing here! We could spend perhaps a month on station, under water, about twice a year. The rest of the time, we would be up on dry land.”
   Sharon looked at Atumopin, and said, “ Fpi ‘awa tìpawm; ‘Awlo ayoe kolä ne Iknimaya, slivu ayoengä ayikran lekye’ung krra ayoe lu mìso ‘awa vospxì “? (For the sake of one question; Once we have gone to iknìmaya, is it possible that our ikrans will become crazy when we are away a month?)
   Atumopin thought for a minute and said,
   “Ke omum fì’u ‘eykefu ayoe fyape. Ngian fpìl oe tsnì suteo Sanhì-sìpä lu ikranä aymaktoyu. Ngal zene pxivam ayoet.” (I don’t know that thing will cause them to feel in which manner. However, I think that there are some people from the Starship who are ikran riders. You must ask them.)
   While Sharon was translating in her head, Eyktan Atumopin and Ateyo exchanged glances. Ateyo then gave a nod to Pxepxi’s friend, named ‘Evan, giving him permission to speak with the Elders. Unfortunately, he had just taken a big bite of meat and needed to finish chewing before he could speak. He managed to murmer,
“'Awa swawtsyìp. Oel yerom. Kxukx oel tivung ngar!” (Just a tiny moment. I am eating. Allow me to swallow!)
   They all laughed as they tried to assure him to take his time as he chewed frantically. Ateyo offered him a drink of water from the gourd canteen which she was carrying.
   “Oeru lu ikran, ulte po lu lefpom akrrä tamätxaw oe. Ngian, pol lu keftxko ulte txopu seri fwa oel tserwa’ poti. (I have an ikran and he was joyous when I returned. However, he is upset and is afraid that I will forget him!)
   “I guess that would be the same for any pet that you might have had on Earth, be it Horse, Dog, or Cockatoo,” commented John.
   Everyone chuckled at that report, and Sharon said, “I guess that I would have to let my Ikran know that I would be gone for a while before I broke tsaheylu for the last time before going underwater for a month”.
   Tai slapped Sharon on the shoulder, and said, “Remember, FIRST you have to win the ikran”.
   Sharon replied, “It will happen, when I am ready,” winking at Atumopin.

   At the edge of the landing field, Ateyo selected some ferns that were adequate for cleaning greasy fingers.  Others followed her lead.  The bones were tossed on the midden heap, to be used later as tools, once they had been dried and probably gnawed upon by little creatures.  The light was fading from the skies and everyone began to assemble upon the spit of land that provided a clear view of the ocean.
   Before crossing the footbridge, Ateyo spoke with Pxepxi, Pamlala, Syulang and Alekxsi.
   “Ma aysmuke.  Fpìl oer fwa ayoengil mivok ayeyktanit txo ayforu sivunu 'awstengyem frapo alu Olo’Samoana kllza’u ne pay amawey.  Tsatseng, ayoe tsun lawk 'erärìpìri olo’ayngeyä. (My sisters.  I think that we should should suggest to the leaders that they should join everyone which is Clan Samoa down to the Calm Water. There, we can all discuss about moving our clan.)
   “Tìmok akosman!” exclaimed Tsahik Lamu’ite.  “Moel pivawm poeti!” (Wonderful idea!  You and I will ask them!)
   Ateyo’s sanhì (bioluminescent freckles) sparkled as her skin heated with embarrassment.  She had forgotten to include the Tsahik who was training her!  Lamu’ite smiled at Ateyo’s embarrassment, and to emphasize her inclusion in this transition, she took Ateyo by the hand and had her lead the Farewell to the Sun Ceremony.
   Once the sun had set, Tsahik Lamu’ite grinned slyly at Ateyo.  The younger tsahik was squirming with anxiety, and Lamu’ite was enjoying her discomfort.
   “For not including you earlier, I am truly sorry,” murmured Ateyo apologetically.
   “Kea tìkin, Ma Ateyotsyìp.  Oel omum fwa nga kolan pawm oer. Sunu oer nari seiyi slu nga ‘ompin nì’ul’ul!” (It’s nothing, my little Ateyo.  I know that you had intended to ask me. I just like to see you become purple [embarrassed] more and more!)
  Ateyo knew that she had just received a gentle reprimand from her elder, and accepted it graciously.
   “We have a lot to do in the future, kefyak?”
   “Yes WE do, Ateyo.  Yes we do.  Slä S’rronur sì Pamlalar run ko. But let’s find Sharon and Pamela!” 
   That wasn’t hard to do, because Sharon and Pamela had taken to shadowing Tai and Ateyo, and Atumopin and Lamu’ite. 
   Within half an hour, (the Star People had kept their timepieces) a procession had begun down the path to the lagoon.

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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #486 on: May 04, 2015, 05:43:34 pm »
485)~  Glowing “lanterns” sparkled at the water's edge as the Renegades, Schroeder’s Raiders (from Tai’s Hidden Base) and many from Kapteyn S’ralta’s ISV, waded into the lagoon which was filled with syuratan ayewll peyä, the bioluminescent sparkling of plants of the water (seaweed).  The twilight air was filled with the chattering welcome of the Laughing Sea Creatures, ayswirä ahusangham, who were circling and leaping from the water, much as Earth Dolphins once did.  It didn’t take long for the aytolfìn to find their previous counterparts.  A long while was spent in quiet tsaheylu, Bonding between pairs.  Eventually, it came to be understood that the next morning, the two-legged creatures intended to move and establish a new camp.  Sunrise, and a projected sense of ‘tomorrow’ was transmitted and received.  The aytolfìn, in turn, projected a vision of carrying two-legged ones upon their backs.  The destination was visualized, the lagoon below the slotted cave was established.  Many eager, aytolfìn turn toward the open sea, only to be beckoned to returned vocally and with visions of sunrise.  The eager ones returned with their hapless riders, laughing in mock dismay.
   Silent conversations continued between ayswirä ahusangham and their respective two-legged friends.  Visions of birthing were shared with Pxepxi and Ka’alani. She hadn’t begun “showing” yet, but sonograms do not deceive!  Aytolfìn use sonar to “see”, and tsaheylu, of course, created an undisputable verification!
   Many enjoyed the vision of aytolfìn and Na’vi looking at each other separated by a clear barrier.  This image was confusing to many and dismissed for later perusal.  Sharon was busy communicating with her dolphin-like friend, sharing visions of the deep sea creatures which she had seen from with the underwater habitat from the trench between Oahu and Kawaii, on Earth.  Her friend returned the favor and was transmitting both visual and sonar images of the creatures it had encountered.  This became a lively exchange, especially with the UnderSea Renegades and all their aytolfìn.
   Eventually, the conversation lulled and all creatures simply relaxed and floated in the tepid water.  If it hadn’t been for the iridescent flash of ikran wings above them, they may have very well fallen asleep.  The Two-Leggeds begged their farewell with a promise of return and adventure in the morning.

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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #487 on: May 16, 2015, 04:47:04 pm »
486)~ Ateyo awakened quite a long while before the first conch shell horn called everyone to greet the day.  She lay quietly beside Tai, listening to her even breathing.  She spent the quiet time thinking of their new clan and the Move they would do today.  She did an inventory of all the items she would take with her, all the shells and bones and tools for her craft. 
   When she heard the footsteps of Tsahik Lamu’ite and Eyktan Atumopin walk by, she bestirred herself and leaned over to Tai and started kissing her.
  “Tìtxen seiyi, Ma Yawnetu!  Tìng Pom! (smack) Tìng Pom! (smack) Tìng Pom!” (smack)
   Giggling.
“Pom lefpom, Ma Ipuyu oeyä!” (Good kiss. My Silly One! - a play on words which they Two shared)
   “Get a room, you Two!”  Taifa’ and Ka’alani had already awakened and were on their feet.
   Tai jumped to her feet and dusted the sand from her skin. (It always intruded into their sleeping place.)  She looked forward to finding a comfortable sleep-leaf near the Slotted Cave. 
   The Four of them approached the tent of sea-monster skin just as the Horn started sounding again.  Giggling was also heard as they approached the doorway of the tent.
   “Rewon lefpom!” called out Tai. (Good morning)
   “Pom lefpom!”   (Good Kiss) called out Ateyo, happy to share her grammatic fakery.
   “The horn is calling us to Greet the Sun.  Alakxsi?  Are you ready?” urged Tai.
   “Srane!” called out Pamela and Sharon simultaneously.  Soon, their smiling, sleepy faces emerged from the tent, pearly white teeth reflecting the glow of the bioluminescent lanterns which the others carried.  The party began their walk toward the tiny peninsula.  Ateyo noticed that the group was smaller, consisting of aysahik and ayeyktan and a handful of others.
   Alekxsi trotted up to Ateyo and got a quick sideways hug as they walked.
“Alakxsi Alekxsi?” It was an old joke begun by Mo’at herself when Alexandra introduced herself as Alex, to Mo’at.  The greeting imparted sweet sorrow as Alekxsi was reminded of her dear mentor.
   “Srane!  Oeru nìhol ayu fwa oe new zamunge nì’aw ne kelku amip.” (I have only a few things which I want to bring to our new home.) She was of, course, wearing her prized possession, the beaded shawl, ‘are, which Ateyo had created for her.
   “Rewon lefpom, Ma Oeyä Tsmuk!”  the familiar voice of Twiti called out.  She never failed to gravitate toward Ateyo.  “Blood is thicker than water!” she would exclaim.  Ateyo was happy with that phrase, knowing that Twiti was part of her own blood.  (That was easier for her to understand than DNA, which seemed quite mysterious.)
  Tai allowed herself to be replaced as the two taller women flanked Ateyo.  She understood the magnetic draw that Ateyo had upon people, but she still felt the sting of her absence when other people took her place next to Ateyo.
   That was Ateyo’s gift; her healing presence.  Sometimes, just a hand squeeze  was enough to set her heart at ease.  People were drawn to this energy.  Tai’s challenge was to share it gracefully.  Sometimes, that was, indeed, a challenge.
   But as they gathered on the peninsula, Ateyo resumed her favorite position, in front of Tai, with Tai’s chin resting on her head.  Tsahik Lamu’ite raised her hands as, seemingly, the sun pressed upward from the ocean’s surface.  Lamu’ite called out. 
  “Rewon lefpom Ma Tsawke!  Ayoeng irayo seiyi fì’ur alu tìyätxaw ngeyä.”  (Good morning Sun!  We thank you for this thing which is Your Return.)  In a flash of thought, she remembered how Dr. Grace had taught them all that the Sun sat far in the sky, and Eywa’eveng, all other moons and planets spun around it.  And yet they watched every morning as the Sun emerged from the water, glowing as though it had never been doused.  However it occurred, she was grateful for the Sun.
   “Ewyal lrrtok sivi ayoengmì akrrka ayoengil hueylanit sop ne ayoeä kelku amip!”  (May Eywa smile on/in us as we travel with our friends to their new home.)
  Tai knew to let her hands rest lightly upon Ateyo’s arms. She knew that Ateyo had entered a deep trance state when her arms raised, seemingly of their own accord.  Tai glanced down at her muntxate whose face was transformed with sweet, ecstatic joy as she was blessed by the sunlight.  Tai herself felt privileged and blessed to be part of this experience.  Secretly, she believed that Ateyo’s hugs were simply a dispersal of this sunlight energy, and Ateyo was simply recharging each morning.  The spell was broken as the aysahik began to trill and cry out with joy at the sun’s energy. 
   Soon everyone filed back towards the ylltxep, the communal fire, and took places in anticipation of rewonä wutzo, morning’s meal.  Little packets of food wrapped in utu mauti leaves (similar to banana or plantain) were passed around.  They were stuffed with fish, fkxen (various vegetables), mauti (fruit), and/or spxam (mushrooms).
  Ateyo wondered how long it took to create these wonderful delicacies, but didn’t hesitate to ingest as many possible.  One couldn’t be sure when one’s next meal would occur.
   “Whoa, slow down, Champ!  I’ve made plenty of extras to eat later, after the journey!” laughed Georgia Barnes, whom Ateyo had named Kxuki.  “I’m not sure how I will carry all my kitchen gear, though.  I’m going to need help with that!”
  “Rä’ä tsnugam, Ma Kxuki!” said Sharon assuredly. (mispronounced, though)
  “Rä’ä sngum si!”  corrected Ateyo.  And interrupted the flow of the conversation to drill Sharon with the pronunciation.
   “Rä’ä sngum si, Don’t worry, Kxuki. We will have one or two dragons available for transport. I’ll make sure that all your pots and pans come aboard.”   This assured the Cook.  She had long ago returned the aluminum and plastic cooking implements to the Mother Ship.  She had learned that, although the Na’vi lived in a toxic environment, they could readily distinguish food which had been prepared or stored in plastic or aluminum.  Even her own taste buds began to favor things which were cooked naturally.

   It pleased Sharon to see the feast come to an end. She was anxious for the Move to get underway.  She learned, though, that dealing with Na’vi, as with Hawaiians, required her to put her expectations of military precision on hold.  Like “Island Time” there would be lots of dawdling and lingering and poking about, that she would have to contend with.  Tai  had an easier time of it. Tai and Taifa’ were from a clan of Hawaiian and Samoan Islanders.  They were not stressing, at all.
   “It’s a shame for hurry through life.  We aren’t fighting war. Or volcano!  Relax, Cuz!  It will all happen in da kinna time!”  laughed Tai.
   Sharon smiled to herself each time she heard this, and she heard it a lot this morning!

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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #488 on: May 28, 2015, 10:51:08 am »
487)~ “Ma ‘Teyo! Ma ‘Teyo!”  Two laughing boys came hurtling from nowhere and tackled Ateyo with hugs.
   “Ma Tsus’itantsìp! Ma Tsuteytsìp! Ftu petsenge mengar zola’u?” (Little Jason, Little Tsu’tey!  Where did you two come from?”
   The two didn’t answer, because they were being tickled by Ateyo.  They pointed their chubby fingers towards their parents, who had failed in harnessing their enthusiasm.
   “Ftang, Ma Menga.  (Stop you Two) Fa pefya’o kamar kxaltxì sivi fyeyntu?” scolded Tsus’itan, their father.  (By which manner did I teach you to greet an adult?)  The two boys stopped immediately and gave the proper greeting to Ateyo, complete with the gesture from the forehead.
   “Oel ngati kameie, Ma ‘Teyo.” 
   Ateyo was relieved by the rescue and solemnly returned the gesture and the greeting.
   “Sla, Sempu,” piped up Tsus’itantsìp.  “Moe ke omum fwa Ma’Teyo lu fyeyntu.” he protested.  (But Daddy.  We didn’t know that Ateyo was an adult.)
It was difficult for those standing nearby to stifle their laughter. 
  “Txoa livu, Ma Ateyo,” interjected Narate Shepard, their mother, who was the sniper who had eliminated the RDA Colonel in the battle of RDA Remnant, a few years previously.
   Ateyo waived off her concern.  “Kea tìkin, Ma Tsmuke!”  (It’s nothing)  But continued with, “Oe pfamìl tsnì ngar tolätxaw  Olo’Omatikayamì.” (I thought that you had returned to Clan Omatikaya.)
   “We did, but the twins immediately asked to return, and when they heard Eyktan JakeSully say that Ateyo was moving, they both wanted to join.      “Tafral ätxäle si soaia oeyä tsnì nì’olo livuhu”  (For this reason, my family requests to be with your clan) asked Narate Shepard.
   “Srane!” shouted the Boys and Ateyo, all at once.  Ateyo then looked apologetically to Tai, whose authority as Eyktan, she had just usurped.
   “You seem to come highly recommended” said Eyktan Tai, smiling at the Two Boys who were climbing on Ateyo.  Ateyo mentioned something quietly to the Two and they came to attention and greeted Eyktan Tai.
   “Oel ngati kameie, Ma Mevi! ” (I see you, my Two Kids!)
   “Ma ‘Teyo pirmllte, San,fwa nga liyu awngeyä Eyktan amip! Sìk!” (Ateyo has just said, Quote, you will be our new Eyktan, Unquote)! 
   “Ateyo lu eyawr!” (Ateyo is right!) laughed Eyktan Tai. “Lu alaksì?” (Are you ready!)
   “Srane, Ma Eyktan!  Oeru lu ikran ‘uvanu ulte petewng!” (Yes, Leader!  I have my toy ikran and three tewngs) said One Boy.
   “Ngar lu aytewng prrnenä.” (You have baby loincloths [diapers]), said the Other Boy.
   While Narate was quieting the argument, Tai and Ateyo excused themselves and gathered their expedition.
   Some were traveling by ikran, some were travelling by aytolfìn and some, like the kitchen crew, were travelling by way of Samson.  Besides the kitchen, there were no large possessions that needed transport.  The biggest question, it seems, was the choice between ikrans and atolfins.  Tai’s ikran and her Samson were both available, as was Sharon’s Samson.  But as Eyktan of the new ‘olo äo txampay, (Clan UnderSea) Sharon had planned to ride a dolfin.  Tai appointed Captain Daniels from the Hidden Base to ferry the kitchen and the Cookie, Georgia Barnes, to the new site using Daniel’s Samson.  He and/or she, could ferry Sharon back later to pick up her Samson.
   On the path down to the lagoon, Spirits were high.  People were laughing and singing, Mothers were organizing their children and their few possessions.  Ateyo was walking alongside Tsahik Alexski, discussing blessing ceremonies for travelling and especially for the new encampment. 
   Atanvi soared overhead, screaming with indignation that Ateyo should choose to swim with the water creatures rather than fly with him.  He made it difficult for her voice to be heard at the lagoon.  Pìwopx Srewyu was seen to be following Atanvi, trying to soothe his wounded pride and offering his tswin. 
   As they arrived at the lagoon, they were pleasantly surprised to see a large number of long canoes already in the lagoon.  Suddenly, Ateyo realized why so few People had attended the trr‘ong ceremony.  The paddlers had left earlier so as to be waiting when the travellers came to the lagoon!
    As the dolphin-like creatures celebrated with acrobatics, happy greetings filled the air.  The paddlers offered to carry the few possessions within their canoes.   This pleased everyone because they had been concerned about their meager possessions becoming soaked in seawater.  The savvy canoeists also brought along many gourds of fresh water for the short journey.  The twin boys were taken aboard, and bid “Eywa Ngahu” to their parents who were flying upon their meikran. 
   The aytolfìn circled around until each had found their Na’vi counterpart.  With many “Eywa ngahu’s” from the shore, the journey was at last underway.  Eyktan Atumopin and Tsahik Lamu’ite were standing in the prow of a canoe at the breakwater of the lagoon.  Their hands were raised in a manner of invoking blessings from Eywa.  Tsahik Lamu’ite’s voice could be heard shouting,
   “Eywal aygnati tivìng tìsop azong!”  (May Eywa give you a safe journey.)
Sea creatures and ayNa’vi swam past the lagoon into the open sea.  Aytolfìn sped through the water effortlessly.  After the first half hour of travel, some of the people began to tire of holding onto the dorsal fins.  Aytolfìn invited them to climb onto their backs.  Indeed, Ka’alani had already been astride her creature from the outset.
   The canoeists came behind the sea creatures, paddling with all their might to keep apace.  The ayikran soared overhead, frequently turning back as they outpaced the swimming creatures.  In fact, Atanvi kept circling back to make diving runs at Ateyo and her Tolfìn in mock battle.  Her Tolfìn thought this was all in good fun and decided to launch into the air as Atanvi dived.  This startled Atanvi to the extent that he banked hard to avoid a mid-air collision and nearly fell into the water.  Ateyo had been forewarned by the sea creature, so she was prepared for the launch and stayed in the water.  The sea creature  stood on its tail, much like an earth dolphin and seemed to laugh.  At first, Atanvi was insulted and tried to sulk, but eventually their antics became a game.
   Halfway through the journey, the sea creatures realized that their riders were becoming tired and hungry.  They lead the large party to a beach and surfed the waves into the shore.  The “picnic” provisions and fresh water were distributed when the canoers came in.
   After they had eaten their fill, people who had brought oil for their skin were helping each other apply it.  The constant exposure to sun and salt water was taking its toll.
   “I’m looking forward to laying down in the clear stream which is behind the Slotted Cave,” groused Twiti, who was Ateyo’s half-sister by DNA.
  “Ma Alekxsi! Tal’engìri ngeya lu ‘ompin akosman! Nìteng oer!” (Alexi, as for your skin, it is a wonderful purple color! The same as me!) admired Tsahik Syulang Aean, as she carefully applied the oil to her back. “Nga lu Na’vi sponoä, nìngay!” (You are a Na’vi of the Island, truly.)  This pleased Alekxsi deeply and it was soon to be seen that these two tsahik would become close friends. 
   Tsahik Lamu’ite, who had travelled with Eyktan Atumopin and the canoers rather than wait behind, was truly pleased to see the budding friendship.  Perhaps Alekxsi would heal from the loss of Mo’at.

   After sufficient rest had been achieved, the ayeyktan began to motivate the people to continue their journey.  The fishermen picked up their paddles and people started walking to the water.
  Ateyo’s progress came to an abrupt end, when with a screech, Atanvi landed before her in the sand.  He was NOT to be denied!  This was HIS Na’vi and he had shared enough!  Ateyo tried to laugh him off with a dismissive gesture, but he blocked her movement when she tried to pass him.  He arched his tswin towards her and she complied.
   “Nga ‘efu fmokx!” admonished Ateyo. (You are jealous!)
   Atanvi didn’t understand the words but sensed the gentle admonishment.  Yet he had triumphed.  He felt her legs wrapped around his neck and realized that she would be riding bareback.  He would have to be gentle!  And he would have to power himself off the ground with his wings alone.
   “Fwa yawo ftu kllte to fwa tswayon ftu ’awkx lu ngäzìk.”  (Taking off from the ground is harder than flying off a cliff.) He heard the words and understood the concept as he launched himself, scattering sand in his wake.
   Taifa’anai sputtered and wiped sand from his face.
   “Sheesh!  Frauvanìri lu yora’tu, lu snaytu. (‘For every game, there’s a winner and a loser.’)
   “Srane! Ulte Atanvi snaytu a’fe lu.”    (Yes! and Atanvi is a sore loser) laughed Tai as she moved off toward the water.

But as the People waded into the water, it was clear that the antics would continue.  Atanvi flew low over the water to gloat over her victory to the Tolfìn. Tolfìn responded by leaping high from the water and nipping Atanvi’s kxetse.  Atanvi would have turned and snapped at the annoying creature, but refrained for fear of unseating Ateyo.  Ateyo’s thoughts ranged from startle, to anxious, to admonishment.  But Tolfìn continued leaping and laughing.  Eventually, Atanvi forgot to be jealous and began to enjoy the game.
   The rest of the journey was entertaining.  The aytolfìn realized the value of playfulness.  Even the ayikran slowed their flight in order to drop back and watch the game.  Some even joined in the fun.
   And because the Slotted Cave was not visible until one had passed it and looked back, many of the travellers were surprised when the aytolfìn lined up to surf through the narrow gap of reef, which encircled their new lagoon.  The lagoon was large and deep enough that the incoming waves were quickly dissipated.  The aytolfìn swam in a circle with their ayNa’vi, and soon the canoes joined them.  Tsahik Alekxsi sat astride her tolfìn and raised her arms.  Soon the other aysahik raised their arms as well.  Tsahik Lamu’ite stood in the prow of her canoe and also raised her arms, bur deferred to the younger tsahik.
   The voice of Tsahik Alekxsi rang clear as a bell as she said,
   “Ma Nawma Eywa, Sopìri akxuke, awngal irayo seiyi!” (O Great Eywa, for our safe journey we thank you!”
  The voices of all Na’vi resounded, “Eywaru lu irayo seiyi.” (To Eywa is Thanks)
   Ka’alani’s voice rang out,
   “Aytolfìnur, a srung sivi ayoenga, ayoeng irayo seiyi.”  (To the dolphins which helped us, we thank very much.)
   In response, the aytolfìn squealed and squawked in delight and tried to stand on their tails, even though their riders were still hanging onto their dorsal fins.  The creatures communicated through their ayswin with their riders, their joy in bringing them to this place.  And asked to be released from service while they hunted.  They assured their two-legged friends of their return the subsequent morning.  They performed a joyful dance for a while, then turned and departed.
   The sun-burned, dehydrated and very grateful people dragged themselves to the sandy beach before the Slotted Cave.

Offline Ateyo Te Syaksyuk

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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #489 on: June 13, 2015, 01:09:03 pm »
488)~  There was a roaring in her ears.  Or was she snoring again? Maybe.  But there was definitely  a roaring in her ears.  And her arm was asleep.  Tai was sleeping on Ateyo’s arm, which is why her arm was asleep, but not she.  The roaring, of course, was the ocean, breaking on the reef which surrounded the lagoon.  Last night, everyone had climbed the banks which flanked the Slotted Cave.  No sense in getting drenched by the incoming tide while sleeping on the beach!
   Carefully, she freed her arm and remained quietly beside her muntxate, reviewing yesterday’s landing.  At first everyone had collapsed on the beach, weary and shrivelled from salt water, and some with sun-burned skin.  The fisherman from the Ikran Clan of the Eastern Sea, were the only ones who seemed exempt from weariness.   They pulled their big canoes far onto shore, debating whether they should pull them higher, which would involve hauling them onto the embankment which was three times their height.  They opted to set watch on the canoes at nightfall. 
   Tai and Sharon conferred with Atumopin on top of the entrance to the Slotted Cave. 
   “Tìefumì oeyä ayngaru tsivun tì‘’awm sivi fìtsenge ro.”   (In my feeling [in my opinion] we could make camp at this place.)  said Tai as she eyed her exhausted group.  Nearly sixty Na’vi and Mipa Na’vi were strewn about the beach in careless abandon. 
“Fmok a kosman! Krray, ftu fìtsenge, awnga tsun rivun aysenge alahe”, agreed Sharon.  (Wonderful idea!  Tomorrow, from here we can look for other places.)
   “Nìtam set tsurokx fongu,” Atumopin concurred. (It is enough now to rest the parties of people.)
   She nodded to the canoers, who were nearby, standing at the ready.  Immediately, they started gathering large rocks from the bottom of the embankment, and started to make a fire ring.  Ateyo caught the intention and encouraged others to help gather firewood.  It didn’t take long for a large pile to be gathered.  It took longer to get a fire started.
   “Rutxe Ma ‘Teyo, srake sleyku nga txepvi fpì awnga?”  (Ateyo, yes/no you can produce a spark for us?”)  Rubbing sticks together always took more time, especially when damp, and everyone knew that Ateyo carried a proper-fire starting kit.  And it was a good thing because she could see no fluff, or dried fungus, or anything that resembled tinder, on the beach.  She made a note of the dried seaweed, though. 
   It gave her great pride to be able to perform this task for the new clan, or clans, on the first night at the new location. Her tinderbox was actually a seashell filled with a waxy residue from a particular plant, and the fluffy flowers of another, and various twigs.  From her pouch she produced two different stones.  One had a long groove carved in it, with which to guide the sparks toward the tinder target.
   With a practiced hand, she struck three times, and created a fat hot spark which she deposited  in the tinder which she held on the fungal mat in her hands.  Blowing furiously, she coaxed a tiny flame to emit from the tinder.  A shout of admiration went up from the crowd which had gathered.  She held the flame as long as she dared, encouraging it to get stronger.  Satisfied, she set it into nest of twigs in the center of the firepit and said,
   “Ma Nawma Eywa, txepìri kelkur amìp ayoeyä, ayoe irayo seiyi!” she cried with delight and not a little pride. (Great Eywa, as for the fire-of-our-new-house, we thank you joyfully!)  This was the first instance of a blessing ceremony that Ateyo performed for her new clan, olo’Samoana.  From this beach fire, the other family fires would be kindled.  Each tsahik for the various family groups gazed at her and the fire in silent wonder.  But it took a comment from her DNA sister, Twiti to break the enchantment:
   “Ma Nawma Tsmuk Ateyo!  Oer lu ‘awa tìpawm.  Pefya nga lu Kame txepvì luke nerekx tswìn ngeyä?”  (In what way do you SEE firespark without burning your neural braid?)


   Ateyo was laying there grinning to herself at the thought of the rhetorical question.  It was actually a high compliment, to SEE and KNOW fire, and summon it to one’s use!
   Her reverie was interrupted when Tai rolled toward her, wrapped her in her arms and tail, and greeted her with the familiar (and grammatically incorrect) refrain of;
“Tìng pom *Tìng pom *Tìng pom * ” punctuated with kisses.
   People started awakening and performing their own morning rituals.  Right in the middle of the Pom Lefpom, as Ateyo referred to it, the conch shell horn sounded!  One of the paddlers has brought it along.  She stood on the  crest of the rock which formed the Slotted Cave, bellowing on the horn, above the Cave Entrance. 
   Tsahik Alekxsi was standing between Tsahik Syulang Aean and Tsahik Ateyo, and said aloud,
   “Kefpìl oe fwa frapo nìwotx tsivun kllkem ‘awsìteng fäpa tsatsenge.” (I don’t think that all the people can stand together upon that place.)
   “Tsatseng lu nìhì’i!”  (That place is too small.) Everyone commented in agreement.  They were gathered at the ylltxep, communal fire, below and to the the east of the Slotted Cave.  The rising sun illuminated the conch shell horn blower, who raised her shell horn above her head in salute to the tsawke.
   Everyone turned automatically to the East and raised their hands where they stood.  The sun sprang into the sky, and as it cleared a group of trees on the east end of the beach,  it dazzled upon the sand as the shadows dissipated.  And as sunbeams kissed the upturned faces, Ateyo said aloud,
   “Tsawkviyìri mihelku amip, awngal irayo seiyi Eywati.” (For this sunbeam on our new home, we thank Eywa!)
With a sense of triumph and excitement, almost simultaneously, the people gave up an ìley, a war cry, and filled the air with their joy.

After the conclusion of the brief morning celebration, the people turned their full attention to the food which was being cooked.  Georgia Barnes, who was known as Kukxi, had prepared prawns, like seylu, on skewers.
  “Fìsyuveìri, Oe irayo seiyi, Ma Kukxi!” exclaimed Pamela as she accepted a skewer of tasty morsels.  She turned to her wife, saying,
  “Nari si, Ma S’rron!  Tsrimp!  (Look Sharon! Shrimp!)  I thought we would have to say good-bye to shrimp when we left the Shrimp Farm inside the ISV! But we have something similar, right here on Pandora!”
   The fishermen from The Ikran Clan of the Eastern Sea exchanged glances.  They had thoroughly enjoyed eating aysrimp ‘Rrtayä which the Star People had presented.  It was a great gift, but not much different than the shrimp which they enjoyed from the waters here.  They each nodded Thanks to words of appreciation which spilled forth in Inglìsì and broken Na’vi.
  “Rutxe, kar oer fya’o stä'ni aysrimp, Ma Tsmukan!” (Please show me the way to catch shrimp, My Brother!) begged Pamela.
  “Aysrimpil”, (he corrected) “Nìlun! Ma tsmuke.”  He turned toward Sharon and inclined his head politely. 
  “Ma Eyktan S’rron sì Ma Eyktan Atumopin.  Sivunu oer set kar fayeylan stä'ni aysrimpil tsenge asìm.” (I would like now to teach these friends to catch shrimp near this place.)
  The meyktan agreed, explaining that they would be conferring inside the cave. They kissed their spouses and watched as the fishing parties dragged the heavy canoes into the water.  As they bobbed on the surface of the lagoon, Pamela watched as Tai, Atumopin and her Sharon entered the Slotted Cave. 

  This fisherman, known simply as Payoang, (Fish) took them into the center of the lagoon and demonstrated the skill of tossing a round, weighted net into the sea.
  He pulled it up by the retrieval cord and came up with a net filled with minnows, crab-like creatures and shrimp-like creatures.  He laughed when the young women made exclamations.
  “Srane nePitsza!”  He had no idea what pizza was or to what they were referring, but they had made signs of recognition.  He gave each of them turns at throwing the net, as did the fellows in the other canoes.  He shouted to them;
   “Awnga zene ‘ì’awn sivi fìtsengero fpi forut kerar, fu ayfo tiverkup fa ‘ohakx!”  (We should stay at this place for the sake of teaching these people, or they will die of hunger!)
  Much laughter. And a reply.
  “Awnga zene kar ayfot txula uranit nìayoengru.” (We must teach them to build a boat such as we do.)
   There was some other conversation about how the New Na’vi probably had a machine for catching fish.  Ateyo reminded them, in Na’vi, that they should show them also, how to make nets.
  “Nìlun, Ma Tsulfätu!  We will teach you, especially!” The fishermen exchanged embarrassed glances now, seeing that Ateyo had been listening to their conversation, quietly. Payoang nodded his apology.
   “Tatlam, ma aynga tswa’ futa Taifa’ane’a stolä'ni payoang aysre’ atsawl fa metsyokx nì’aw.” (Apparently, you all forget that Taifa’ana’e has caught a fish with large teeth by means of two hands only.)
   The expressions on their faces was satisfaction enough for Ateyo.  Everyone from the Eastern Sea had remembered the fearless capture of the shark-like sea creature in their own lagoon by Eyktan Tai’s ‘Cuz’.
   Shadows of wings played over the bodies in all of the canoes.  The ayikran were wheeling above and calling out. 
  “Tätxaw ko!” (Let’s return.) called out Payoang, with a grin at Ateyo.
   They paddled in towards shore.  Children and others were playing in the lagoon with the aytolfìn.  As they were pulling the canoes ashore, the ayeyktan were on the shoreline and motioned for all the people to gather at the ylltxep.
   Obviously, there was something to discuss!

Offline Ateyo Te Syaksyuk

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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #490 on: June 24, 2015, 12:45:24 pm »
489)~The main chamber of the Slotted Cave was spacious.  For those who might have have geologic experience, they would have recognized that this cave was once a huge lava bubble.  A first glance it seemed to have smooth walls, but once one’s eyes had adjusted to the dim light, one could see that the rock wall was actually arranged with undulating layers; shelves or natural benches upon which to sit or lay.  The people had banded together in “family” groups and filed in from the various openings.  The largest opening was the Slot itself.  The tide was high enough that water filled the bottom of the cave.  Two canoes, side by side, complete with outriggers easily slipped through.  In these canoes, the ayeyktan had been brought within the Slotted Cave.
Ateyo was standing next to Tai in the canoe which they were in. She had agreed to help Atumopin with translations. But her eyes swept the vast interior.
  The two halves of the cave seemed to Ateyo, to resemble two hands with the fingertips touching, and the heels of the hands, almost touching.  She also remembered the impolite snickering of the young men in Kofi’s group, at the mildly suggestive form of female anatomy.  She felt her face redden, or purpled, in embarrassment and annoyance at the memory. She dismissed the memory and turned her attention towards Eyktan Atumopin, whose red body paint glimmered in the shaft of sunlight which descended from the opening at the top.
Atumopin’s voice reverberated throughout the cave. 

  “Ma Oeyä Frapo. Oel ayngati kameie. ” (My everybody. I SEE you all.)
  “Fìtrr ayoeng kame ngeyä kelku amip. (Today we all SEE your new home.)
  “Fìsläru aymo apxey fpi ayngeyä snä’o rivey mì ‘awsiteng.  (This cave has many spaces/rooms/chambers for the sake of your groups in which may live together.)                                                                                                                                                                                                   “Eyktan S’rronur keomum fya’o Na’viä.  Tafral Po mllte fwa Eyktan Tai lu nawma Eyktan ayngaru nìwotx.  (Eyktan Sharon doesn’t know the Way of the Na’vi.  For this reason she agrees this thing which Eyktan Tai is Great Leader of all of you.)
  “Nìteng Ma Pamlala mivllte fwa mesahik, Ma Alekxsi sì Ma Syulang Aean kivar Fya’o Na’viä.  (The same, Pamela agrees this thing which Two Tsahiks, Alekxsi and Syulang Aean, will teach the Way of Na’vi.)
   “Nìteng Ma Tsahik Lamu’ite sì Oetsyip ìvi’awn ayngaru trr pxeya nìsrunga’ fya’o. (The same, Tsahik Lamu’ite and Little Me will stay for many days in a helpful manner.)
   “Fayu livu. Oe polltxe.” (These things will be. I have spoken.) Eyktan Atumopin clapped her hands in finality and helped her spouse to her feet in the canoe. During this short time span, people turned to each other, commenting.  They politely desisted when Tsahik Lamu’ite raised her hands.
   “Oel slärit akosman kameie a Eywal ngolop ulte ayngaru rolun.”  (I SEE a wonderful cave which Eywa has created and which you have found.)
   “Tì’efumi oeyä fi’u livu kelku atxantsan.” (In my feeling it will be an excellent home.)
   “Sämok oeyä lu futa ‘aw mo sar ayhrrur azey ulte aysahikur tìkirvar.” (My suggestion is that one area be used for special/distinct times and for the teaching of aysahik.)
   “Nìprrte oer fwa Ma Ateyo sngolä’i Rewonä Kaltxì si tsawkxeri!”  (I am pleased that Ateyo has begun Morning Greetings to the Sun.)
   “Law lu oer fwa fa pxeya aysahik ayoeng tsun ngop sä'eoio fìtsengru.  (It is clear to me, that with this many aysahik, we can create a ceremony for this place.)
   “ ‘Efu ‘o’!” (I feel excitement!)  Beaming with joy, she reseated herself next to Atumopin, who did not stand, but raised her voice and said,
  “Ma Tai!  Nga lu ftxuli'uyu nìhay!” (Tai you are the next speaker.)

Tai looked at Atumopin, smiled her gratitude, and said, “Ma nawma Eyktan Atumopin. Fpi kerar ayoengä mipa Na’vi,  skxomìri oe irayo seiyi.” (Great leader Atumopin, for this opportunity for the sake of teaching our new Na’vi,   I thank you very much). Tai quickly glanced around the cavern, and noticed than she had everyone’s attention, so she went on.
  “Ayfo wolem fpi txampayä ayswirä slä txanewa aytute mì ‘Rrta tspolang feyä Sa’nok.”  (These people fought for the sake of Ocean creatures, but greedy people on Earth killed their Mother).  Tai took a brief moment, and concluded with, “Ayfo wamintxu ayoe eana te’lan nìsngä’i ayfol stamawm ayoeti.  Ayoe set nume nìprrte’ ayfo f’yao nì Na’vi.”  (They showed us blue hearts at first we heard them, we now teach them pleasurably the path of the Na’vi).
From the the entire assemblage came many shouts of “Mllte oe !”
   Eyktan Atumopin and Tsahik Lamu’ite exchanged glances and tried to swallow their smiles.  But it was Tsahik Lamu’ite who spoke. She motioned for Ateyo to translate.
  “Ma Tai ulte mipa Na’vi nìwotx!”
     (“Tai and all new Na’vi.”)
  “Ayoel stawm fì’u Sawtuteru tspamang feyä Sa’nok.”               
      (“We hear this thing which Sky People killed their Mother.”)
  “Slä rä’ä fpìl futa Sawtute ahì’i tsun tsivpang Nawma Tirea.”
      (“But don’t think that little SkyPeople can kill the Great Spirit.”) 
   “ ‘Rrta lamu ‘eveng Nawma Sa’nokä. Fo tspolang sängop peyä. Ke Ngopyu!”
      (“ ‘Rrta was child of Great Mother.  They have killed her creation. Not the creator!”)
   “Fi’ul lu wawey kame ayngati.”
      (“This is important for you all to SEE.”)
   “Tìtspang sängop lamu fi’u kawnglan. Slä kxawtu ketsun tivsapang Ngopyu.”
      (“Killing creation was bad-hearted. But no one can kill the Creator.”)
   “Law lu oer fwa Eywal Kame Ayngati nìwotx.  Ayoeng ayngati zene kar fya’o nìNa’vi fte aynga sleyku Na’vi nìno! Ma Tai sì Ma Ateyo ulte Ma Alekxsi sì Ma Syulang Aean, fyowintxu ayngar nìwotx.”
      (“Apparent to me that Eywa SEES You all.  We must teach to you the manner of Na’vi in order that you become Na’vi thoroughly. Tai, Ateyo, Alekxsi and Syulang Aean will guide you all.”)
   Tsahik Lamu’ite looked at all the eager faces seated on the shelves within the cave.  How strange to have New People, who needed to be taught how to become People! She felt she needed a conclusion. She called out”
   “Srake. Mllte aynar?” (Yes/No, do you all agree?)
  She was pleased to hear murmurs of assent and nodding of heads.  Atumopin, in her enthusiastic manner, stood and shouted,
  “Kestawm oeti!” (I can’t hear you!)
   The crowd, being mostly military in training replied in near unison,
   “MLLTE OE!”
Satisfied, Eyktan Atumopin turned to Tai, and announced,
   “Txantsan! Set Ma Tai sì Ma S’rron wivintxu ayngati aymo mìslärur!” (Wonderful. Now Tai and Sharon will show rooms in the cave!)

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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #491 on: July 12, 2015, 12:36:29 pm »
490)~After seven days of organizing and reshuffling, the cave had come to accomodate the many groups and families among the two new clans.  The clan which was governed by Eyktan Tai and Tsahik Ateyo was known as Olo’Samoanä, which meant Clan of Samoa, in honor of the tribal island homeland from which Tai and her cousin Taifa’ana’e had originated.  Her name meant Incoming Tide, and his name meant Outgoing Tide, in the native tongue of Samoa.  The crew from the Hidden Base and their aymuntxate, mostly from Ateyo’s clan Zongtseng Alor, also comprised that clan.
  Major Sharon’s West’s clan was the group of UnderSea Renegades who had come to be known as Olo’äoTxampay. Clan Under the Ocean. It was rather small perhaps twenty, depending on current romances.
  The clan from S’rralta’s Starship had voted to call themselves, Olo’Aysopyu Sanhìä. (Clan of Travelers of the Stars, or SuteSanhìä- Star People)  As their Eyktan, they voted Tael Karbaki, Dale Garbacki. As their Tsahik, his muntxate Träsi, (Tracy Ibitsen).  Among these members of the Star People Clan were; Georgia Barnes, a.k.a. Kxuki, Frederick Lind, David Scott Jaggers, Tsantxen Eywa (who never uttered his Earthly name) and the friends of Kofi and Pxepxi; Owen, Zach, and Joey.
   Ateyo was somewhat disappointed that Pxepxi would not be joining Olo’Samoanä, but that is the way of mothers regarding their daughters.  Their clans were situated in adjoining chambers of the Slotted Cave, so parting was no sorrow.    What made the point of pride for Kofi’s father and mother, was that Kofi had been appointed Eyktanay, a minor chief of his party of five. (and soon to be six, Tsahik Pxepxi would be delivering her baby in a few weeks.)
   “Hey Cuz.” Taifa’ asked of Tai. “Shouldn’t there be some kind of ceremony for Kofi?  Like a tattooing ceremony from back home?”
   “Aw. Come on, Cuz!  You know the Na’vi don’t tattoo!” 
  “Srane. Oel omum. Slä Pxepxiru lamu tìlen azey tsakrr po sleyku tute.” (Yes I know. But to Pxepxi was special event at time she became a woman.)
   “Ulte ikranu kawtur kipayoeng.” (And no one among us has an ikran!) “Iknimayìri ayoeng zene kem. (As to Iknimaya, we must do,) stated Sharon.
   Eyktan Tai replied.  “Iknimayìri oel ätxäle siyi Eyktan Atumopin. Poel ivomum tìlen Iknimayeri.” (As to Iknimaya I will request of Eyktan Atumopin.  She will know about the Iknimaya event.)  This had been a major concern of Tai’s for a long time.  But she knew that she could rely upon Atumopin for this important matter.
   Pamela joined the conversation.  “But shouldn’t we have a ceremony where we are inducted as part of the People?  We read about Jake’s ceremony in the archives.  We should do something like that, kefyak? Painting each other and making an interconnecting snowflake-like structure?” 
   Sharon responded with enthusiasm; “Mllte oe!  Ayoeru lamu zene tìlen azey!”  (I agree!  To us should be a special event.)
   “Srane. Slä ayoel zene kivar ayngar fya’o leNa’vi. Ulte ‘uo zene a nivume ayoer lu pefya txula ayuran.” (Yes but we must teach you all the way of the Na’vi.  And one of those things which we must learn, is the manner to build boats,” added Taifa’ana’e, who was anxious to learn this craft.
  “Kosman!  Ayoe tsun sngä’i pxiset!”  (Wonderful! We can begin right now!) exclaimed Payoang.  He looked back and forth at Tai and Sharon.
“Txo menga mllte!” (If you two agree.) he demurred.
  “Kosmana fmok.” (Wonderful suggestion,) blurted Tai. “Srake, aynga lu hasey set?” (Yes, no. Are we done?)
  “Srane! Wintxu fya’o, ko!” (Yes! Show us the way!) exclaimed Taifa’.

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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #492 on: July 24, 2015, 09:40:28 am »
491)~ ”Srake. Nari si sameutral?” (Yes/No. You see those two trees?)  said Payoang to Taifa’anae. He had brought S’rron, Taifa’ and Ateyo and Tai and others, to select two trees from which to make long canoes. “Sameutral lu kerusey stum. Ayoel mefoti tsun sar.” (Those two trees are without life almost. We can use those two.)
   “Srake ayoel mefot pximivun nekllte faya sä’o. Kefyak?” (Yes/No, we will cut to the ground by means of these tools, isn’t that right?) asked Sharon, though the tone of her voice implied doubt.
   Payoang threw back his head and laughed.
   “Kehe! Tsakem ketam!” (No! That action would not suffice!) “Srung sivi oer ne starsìm rìn.”  (Help me to collect wood.) He bent down a grabbed a branch and leaned it against the trunk of one of the trees. Everyone did likewise until both trees had skirts of broken branches arranged around them.  As he worked he sang a song and taught them to sing it as well.
   Ma Nawma utral (Oh Great tree)
   Nga kllkxolem fìtseng (you have stood in this place)
   Eywa nì’aw omum pe txana krr. (Eywa only knows how much time.)
   Ma Nawma utral (Oh Great tree)
   Nga kìte’e soli atxansan. (You have served well)
   Ulte set ayoe ätxäle si ngaru (And now we request of you)
   ‘Awe kìte’e ator (One final service)
   Ma Nawma utral (Oh Great tree)
   Kemìri ayoe livu (For this action we will commit)
   Ayoe ätxäle si txoa slivu ayoer (we request forgiveness become to us)
  Ma Nawma Utral (Oh Great Tree)
  Nga roley fa ngeyä ayvenu nekllte (You have lived with your feet in the ground)
  Ma Nawma Utral (Oh Great Tree)
  Ngeyä tirea salew Eywahu (You spirit will go with Eywa)
  Slä nga rayey mìtampxay (But you will live in the Great Water)
  Ngal nari sayeiyi kosmana ayuti (You will see wonderful things)
  Ayoe panutìng seiyi ngar (We promise to you)
  Leykatem ngat (You will become changed)
  Ngal kìte’e sivi Na’ri (You will serve the People)
  Ulte ayoe irayo seiyi tì’ìevay krra! (And we will thank you until the end of time.)

   It seemed to Taifa’ that the song would be hard to learn until he realized that these were the same words he would have said as an explanation.  It seemed that Payoang was making up the lines as he went along.  He would sing each line and everyone would repeat it.  It was more like a chant than a melody.
   At some point, the fires were actually lit.  Payoang kept chanting about the strength of the tree for enduring the pain of being burned down. In between verses, or whenever he deemed necessary, he would stop chanting and explain to Taifa’ and the others the manner of tending the fires.  The fire had to be concentrated to form the pointed shape of the canoe.  (Taifa’ thought himself kanu (smart) when he realized that the word Canoe rhymed with Kanu.) The group was also informed that this process would take the rest of the day and the better part of the night.
      Sharon divided the groups into fire watches.  Ateyo and Pamela fashioned mops of seaweed mounted to long sticks, for the purpose of dousing wayward sparks.  Soon the aysahik were making and applying salves to blistered and toasted toes.  (For instance; Ateyo had stomped on an ember without weighing the consequences.)
   Kxuki, Georgia Barnes, kept the kitchen fires going.  The steady line of “customers” reminded her of the chow lines she once managed aboard the ISV.  Everyone took turns tending the tree fires, so eventually, she and her crew were relieved of kitchen duty for a chance to rest and/or tend the tree-fires.  The boys who turned the spits were fascinated by the larger fires, and barely could be restrained.  Kofi was instrumental in helping Kxuki rotate the youngsters among the chores of fishing, gathering, hunting, and of food prep.  Pxepxi was not content to be left out of the activities, though she was large with child.  She preferred fishing with the small nets and had become quite proficient. Even Kofi’s Mother was large with child, and she was fishing as well.
   Ateyo created a small party of foot-protect creators, hawnven ayngopyu.  This was only necessary because so many people were closely involved with fire.  Large patches of leather were wrapped around a person’s foot and held in place with lacing.  She directed a mud pit to be maintained (by the boys of Narate Shepherd) so that the shoes, such as they were, could be coated with clay or cooled with damp sand.
   A festive air was felt around the camp and as the day wore on, few were willing to leave the area where the trees stood burning.  The chanting was continuous with new singers adding new lines and verses.  Gathering firewood was a constant chore.  At sun down, the horn was sounded.  Everyone paused what they were doing and faced the setting sun.  They raised their hands in salute as the sun melted away.  Sunlight gave way to torchlight and the trees continued to burn.  Those in their turn retired to the cave for sleeping.  Some simply collapsed on the beach for a nap. 
   Sometime during the chill morning hours, the trees began to sway. And sway violently.  The entire camp got to their feet.  With a loud groaning and fierce crackling, the two trees came crashing to the ground.  Even Pxepxi recoiled at the sound which stirred an old memory.  The falling of the Omatikaya Hometree.      All stood in stunned silence.
   The strong voice of Payoang pierced the air.
“Ma Nawma Utral, reyìri ngeyä ayoe irayo seiyi.” (Oh Great Tree, for your life, we thank you so much)  He had not been present at the falling of Omatikaya Kelutral, so at first he was puzzled when no one responded.  He had to repeat it again before the others caught on and chanted their response in unison.  Usually, he felt elation at felling trees for canoes.  This time he sensed the sadness and even the memories of terror.
  “Meutral lu set ne kllte.” (The two trees are on the ground now.)he said.
 “Slä oel fpìl fwa ayoe zene ftivang fte’ aysahik tsun zeyko.” Ateyo sensed his puzzlement and concern. (But I think that we will stop in order that the tsahiks can cause healing.)  Payoang nodded his agreement and gratitude.

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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #493 on: August 02, 2015, 01:11:17 pm »
492)~After an abbreviated Greeting of the Morning Sun, almost everyone retired to the cool, darkness of the Slotted Cave.  The syuratan (bioluminescent glow) was almost like being under Nawma Utral, the huge Tree. All the soft mosses that grew on the walls sparkled.  The seaweed that grew along the bottom of the channel, which ran the length of the cave, swayed in a mesmerizing fashion.  Most people had devised sleep-leaves  by weaving together vines and fibers.  (There were not many Ean-Ean plants growing nearby.)  Ateyo’s eyes became heavy from fatigue and from watching the swaying seaweed below.  As she drifted off to sleep, she could hear in her mind, the song chanted to the Trees.  She knew the aysahik would be needed tomorrow to tend physical ailments from the coming tasks ahead.
   She and the other aysahik had been in favor of taking everyone to the stream behind the Slotted Cave.  The banks were lined with ayutral aymokri, Trees of Voices.  Ancestral knowledge was conveyed through the vines, or tendrils, which reached down as a delicate pink canopy.  But the people were too weary, and their feet too battered to agree to the short hike.  Perhaps a nap would refresh them and all would be willing to delay their work for awhile longer.  It seemed to Ateyo that it would be well for everyone to return to this immense project rejuvenated.
   “Ma ‘Teyo!” someone whispered anxiously. “Ma ‘Teyo!”
   She didn’t even realize she had been asleep.
   “Txansan! Nga lu tìtxen si!” (Good you are awake!) It was the voice of Tsahik Alekxsi.  “Ayoengil frapotihu zene starsìm ulte salew ne ayutral aymokri, set.” (We must go with everyone to the Trees of Voices, now.)
  Ateyo was reluctant to leave her slumber.  She actually dreamed that she had gotten up and faced Alekxsi.  But the voice was more urgent, and a hand shook her shoulder.  “Kehe! Rä’ä hahaw tätxaw!” (No! Don’t return to sleep!)
   Ateyo felt annoyed. Where was Tai? Shouldn’t she have intervened? With great effort, she hauled herself out of the double sleep-net, and sat gawping at both Tsahik Alekxsi AND Tai.
   “Kä Ko, Ma Yawnetu! (Let’s Go my Beloved!) “Livu sämok ngeyä, kefyak?” It is your idea, isn’t that right?)
   “Oe lu tìtxen si, slä eltu oeyä lu hivahawmi.” ( I am awake, but my brain is still asleep), said Ateyo with a huge yawn.

   It was mid-morning when everyone roused up and threaded their way up the narrow canyon.  Syanan, a series of tiny waterfalls, cascaded down the narrow canyon.  People found comfortable places to sit or lie down upon the mossy boulders that lined either side of the tumbling stream.  There were so many Trees of Voices with their pink tendrils that it seemed a curtain lined the entire trail.
  Everyone was now interconnected by means of tsahelyu, the intimate bond created when the neural tendrils of their ayswin connected with the tendrils of the Trees. She and Tai lay down next to Pxepxi and Kofi.
   The sounds of the laughing waters and beauty of the pink tendrils nearly sent Ateyo back to dreamland. Yet soon she experienced voices in her head, quietly chanting, “Eo Eywa oe 'ia. Eo Eywa oe 'ia. Eo Eywa oe 'ia.” (I lose myself before Eywa.) the voices of the aysahik, the voices of the Mothers.  She could even distinguish the voice of Mo’at, yet was able to allow her presence to flow among them.
   It seemed, though, that Eywa spent some time visiting her half daughter, Alekxsi/Sylwanin.  It seemed to Ateyo, that she and others were now within the Ramunong Ayvitra, the Well of Souls.  She watched in fascination as Mo’at and Mendllzong spoke together over the recumbent figure of Alekxsi.  Ateyo heard Aleksi’s voice narrating the scene as she watched.
  “Mo'at and her human colleague, 'a tawtuteä tsahik' (a doctor of medicine, in human terms) were making some joint investigation (or quest for knowledge - in Na'vi terms). The human doctor was wearing the lab coat and had all sorts of gadgets in his pockets. I, in my Avatar body, happened to be the lucky (or not) guinea pig. I was told to lie on a big mossy stone in front of the Tree of Souls. Mo'at took her 'scalpel' out; the scene was worryingly reminding of a Mayan sacrifice , but she only made a tiny cut in the heart area. The cut started immediately glowing pink and purple, like the Tree's tendrils, and turquoise green, like the grass under it, it looked like my blood took on the colors of the environment!  Mo'at motioned that I could go, turned to her human colleague, and the two launched in an excited conversation of "oh, yay, wow, txantsan, look at this, I would have never thought..." type.
  Eywa only knows why my blood sample caused such an enthusiasm but I was rather glad to get off the 'altar'! I don’t particularly like being sacrificed, not even for the sake of science - or knowledge. I would have much preferred to be with the dancers! “

  It amazed Ateyo to realize that she was experiencing another’s recollection of a dream.  The heartache reminded her of the loss of Mo’at, and of the human counterpart of Mendllzong, the kind, bearded fellow with the accent.  Ateyo even understood the entire concept of Mayan sacrifice and shared the impending terror.
   She wondered what it meant.  It didn’t surprise Ateyo that Alekxsi’s blood appeared to reflect the colors of natural world.  She wondered if human blood appeared as fngap, metal!  That thought escaped and was replaced by the image of Mo’at, hovering over her with her “scalpel”.  Was she going to prick her as she had Jake?  Everyone knew that story.  Half Ateyo’s blood came from that of an RDA exploratory miner, long before RDA built Hell’s Gate.  Did Mo’at need to prick Ateyo and invite her become FULLY Na’vi? Would she always remain half-Na’vi?
Would her blood sparkle like nature or shine like metal?  Her troubling vision was soon replaced with another.  A very bloody Alekxsi was lying on the “altar” once more.  Ateyo could hear Alekxsi narrating her dream again:
   “I felt as if I was just regaining consciousness. I was lying on my back. I saw Mo’at and younger Mendllzong thru the branches. It seems that I had been in quite a mess: I had several big and heavily bleeding wounds and lots of minor cuts; my head hurt, too. I briefly wondered what in the world I had gotten myself into (was I attacked by a pack of viperwolves, or survived an earthquake, a bombardment, or what?) and how I got under the Tree of Souls, but at that moment Mendllzong asked Mo’at something; she ‘scanned’ me with those laser-look eyes top to bottom, then shook her head and replied: “Her wounds are too great, she is very weak”. ‘
“At this I almost woke up! I said: “Mo’at… you don’t hold much hope for me, do you?’” 
Alekxsi continued her narration.
   “Mo’at stared at me for a few seconds, and then asked straightforwardly:
   ‘Do you want to stay, or do you want to go?’
   “Now, what!?  How many times had I asked The Almighty Whoever to please take me away from this world where I don’t seem to fit, and send me thru the eye of Eywa straight to Pandora! But now faced with this direct question I suddenly didn’t know what to say… In the end I managed:
   ‘Err… ahem… well… If I can be absolutely sure that I’ve done everything, everything, everything that I am supposed to do on ‘Rrta I will gladly go, this very minute! But how can I be absolutely sure that I’ve done everything, everything, everything?’
  ‘You’re not sure then?’ – Mo’at stated.”
   It was obvious to Ateyo at this point, through Alekxsi’s Dream, that Eywa was addressing the mipa Na’vi.  And herself.  Anyone who lived in both worlds.
Ftxey. Choose.  But how? Were not they all living as Na’vi, no matter their blood mixture?  Why now, when everyone had Na’vi aytokx, not connected to the TsaTute Place? or an ISV?
  How would Pxepxi choose?  She was enthralled with the world of the Sky People.  She wanted to fly to the other moons.  What would happen?
   “Txo ngaru lu Eana Txe’lan, ngaru lu tì'eyng.”  (If you have a Blue Heart, you have the answer.)  It wasn’t a voice. Just a knowledge.  And then Ateyo was at peace.  She knew that everything would work out best.  She didn’t know how. She didn’t know why.  She only felt at peace.

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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #494 on: August 16, 2015, 09:41:53 am »
493)~It was late morning when Ateyo and the aysahik returned from their experience at the Syananä Aymokri (Waterfalls of Voices.)  It surprised them to find ayikran circling above the Slär (cave).  But they were not merely ikrans of Olo’Samoana.  It was only moments before Ateyo recognized the biggest ikran.  It was not a toruk, but was as large as Tai’s ikran.  It was her cousin, Eyktan Ikxeru, on his big ikran with Tsahik Meykir sitting behind him.  There was a small party of ayswayonyu (flyers) also from Clan Zongtseng Alor who had accompanied them.  Soon they were alighting upon the the rock and cliff that formed the cave.
   “Eywa Ngahu ulte Kaltxì,  Ma Ikxi sì Ma Meykir!” Ateyo abandoned formality and referred to her cousin by his nickname. Formality was also abandoned in favor of copious hugs which were exchanged between old family members.  Ateyo was in full swing, hugging even those whom she did not recognize. She was in the midst of a big hug when she heard Ikxi explain,
   “Fìzimau’yu syaw lu Tatyana. (This newcomer is called Tatyana.)  Ayuìri ayoengur zene lawk.  (About many things we must discuss.)
   “Nìlun, Ma Ikxi!  Srake, aynga ‘efu ‘ohakx?  Nga solop txankrr.  ULTE, Oel hefi fwa uot onlor.”   (Of course, Ikxi.  Yes/no, you all feel hunger? You have travelled for a long time! AND I smell something good!)
   “Nga lu tìyawr, Ma Tsmuk! (You are right, sibling/relation) Oeru lu fahewit afwang hefi. (To me a smell which is savory to smell.)  Everyone followed the tantalizing scent toward the area where the two trees had been felled.  At daybreak, the UnderSea Renegades had been left sleeping.  But now there was a fire pit with a spitted Fwampop slowly roasting over the coals.  Enthusiastic hugs were shared all around and the new group was invited to sit down.
 Ateyo accepted the piece of meat offered to her by Chip. 
   “Where you getting fwampop?” she inquired of Chip.
   “In the marsh by the waterfall,” was his satisfied reply.
   “You all do well.  Woke up feel hunger. You hunt food and cook. You will make good aytaronyu. Yes/No? you make thank words for animal?”
   Seven heads nodded vigorously and Sharon responded with “Srane” and recited the words for Ateyo to hear.
  Ateyo nodded and smiled, as she motioned for a new person in the crowd to join her.
   “This person is from you sanhisìp.  Alekxsi and I teach to her healing in Na’vi way.”
   Sharon, Pamela, John and Wendy, had walked over to Ateyo as she sampled the tsngan (meat).  They greeted the newcomer, and John said,
   “I recognize you from the ship! Fyape syaw fko ngar?” (How does One call you?)
   “Tatyanan Kryzhanouskaya, but you can call me Tatyana, until we figure out a Na’vi name for me.  I am visiting from the Olo’Zongtseng Alor to study under Ateyo and Aleksi.”
  “Tatyaru lu reypay Ikxeruä, ulte Ikxeru lu tsmukan oeyä Sa’nok, a nìkeftxo, oe kame kawkrr. (To Tatya is blood of Ikxeru, the brother of my mother, whom unfortunately I never knew.)
   Ateyo continued her explanation.  “Slä peyä muntxate, Tsahik Meykir, kampi seiyi oer, lesoaia nìteng. (But his wife, Tsahik Meykir, treated me as family the same)
   “Ulte, Oeyä muntxate, TaiTaeAo, lu Tsmuk pum Ikxeruä! (And my wife, TaiTaeAo is sibling also of Ikxeru!) Looking around, Ateyo realized that her muntxate was not present. “Poe pivähem ye’rin!” (She will arrive soon.)      Tatyana had been well versed in the relations of everyone in her new soaia while she had lived in Olo’Zongtseng Alor.  It didn’t startle her to know that she was related to Ateyo and Tai through DNA used in the Avatar program.  She was, however, pleased to observe how thoroughly delighted was Ateyo to include her in her family. Tatyana was also pleased to be introduced by Ateyo as Tatya.  Or Kuz Tatya. (She later learned that Kuz, was short for cousin was a borrowed English word.) She had already been dubbed with a nickname! Tatya.
    In this manner she was seated next to Pxepxi, Ateyo’s adopted daughter, who was obviously with child.  She watched the young husband gifting his wife with marrow bones.  It pleased and startled her when both Kofi and Pxepxi invited her to come to the lagoon when Pxepxi was to give birth.  As a family member, her presence was important!
   “You will be Auntie Tatya to the prrnen!” laughed a woman who was introduced as Kofi’s mother, Ka’alani.
  At that point, a call was heard from the trees above.  The LookOut pointed upward.  “MEIKRAN ZA’U”  (Two Ikrans Come!) Within moments, the huge ikrans of both Taifa’an’ae and TaiTaeAo alighted in the sand not far from the group.  Ateyo and Ka’alani ran to meet their memuntxate, (two spouses) and soon the ayeyktan and aysahik were conferring.  Tai and Taifa’ were excited to see Eyktan Ikxeru and were briefly introduced to Tatyana.
   However, Tatyana was not able to sit and visit with Tai.  Not at this moment.  Tai was busy dividing the group into two learning groups. Some to learn hunting skills, some to learn healing skills.   She was disappointed that she wasn’t able to spend time with Tai.  But found herself drawn into the group with Ateyo.  Tai turned to her and said,
   “Ma Tatyana, we will have more time to get acquainted when we eat txonä wutzo. (evening meal) Slä, set nga zene ka ‘awsìteng Ateyohu kar zeyko fyaoNa’vi.” (But now you must go with Ateyo to learn to cause healing in the manner of the Na’vi.)
  Someone asked about a canoe building task.  Tai addressed that person as Eyktan S’rron, and assured her that the wood needed a few days to dry.  Someone named Payoang responded by saying, in Na’vi, “It is good that you all proceed with learning the Na’vi method of healing.  We will probably all need the use of those skills as we build those canoes!”


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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #495 on: August 25, 2015, 08:17:59 pm »
494)~ Ateyo spent the morning with the aysahik, identifying, collecting, and discussing the preparation and application of herbs.  Her focus was upon ointments and salves for treating burns and blisters. Ateyo removed the headband from her burden basket and allowed the straps to drop from her shoulders.  She began emptying the contents, and lining them upon a log.  Most were empty gourds and baskets for collection.  Though, some had mysterious contents.  Pretty birds with long bills flitted about her.
  “Srake? Tse’a faya ayyayo? (Yes/No, see these birds?) Follow for finding txumpaywll!”  Luckily, the birds had reached their destination and were busy drinking the acidic sap from the Scorpion Thistles nearby.
   “Oh these are like hummingbirds from Earth.  I saw videos from NatGeo.”  Tatyana was delighted to see them in reality, or their Pandoran counterparts, at least.
  “Fìwll syaw Txumpaywll, stated Ateyo to her aynumeyu (students)”
   “Pay means water and wll means plant, kefyak?” asked Pamela enthusiastically.  “Srake, lu ftxìor?” (Yes/no it tastes good?)
   Ateyo tried hard not to laugh out loud, but snorted, “Kehe, Ma Pamlala!  Lì’u TXUM ral POISON.”  (the word TXUM means POISIN.) She paused to let this sink in.  Pamela looked  dismayed to realize her lack of vocabulary caused her embarrassment, and could have caused worse. Ateyo tried to explain;
“Ma Pamlala! Txumpaywll  can be poison if too much.  Slä if not too much can make no pain.”
  Ateyo was disappointed to see the looks of confusion upon the faces of all the aysahik trainees.  Though Tatyana had a look of expectent curiosity.  Ateyo was anxious to clarify;
  “We take wllreypay, plant life-water, like this:” Ateyo produced a small knife and a gourd-bowl.  She uttered a few words of apology to the plant, and carefully made a few slices in the bulbous  stem of the plant.  She collected a small amount while explaining.  “Put poison on arrowhead for make animal not run. Make animal slow and sleep.”
   “Poison arrows?  But wouldn’t the meat get poisoned, too.  Not good to eat?”  asked Christy Castillo.  She had debated whether to attend the Iknimaya training or follow her Sister.  She knew the answer to the question she had asked, of course.  Zina had taught her to use the sap as poison for their hunting arrow points.
  “Not kill but make sleepy and slow.  Make good food for Na’vi, and make little sleep after.  Slä, but, use wllreypay for make skin sleep. No pain! Slä, but must put other thing ‘awsìteng, together mix.  I show you.”  Ateyo demonstrated the mixing procedure, explaining proportions. 
   Much to Ateyo’s relief, she found an able translator in Alekxsi, who had studied extensively under the Great Mo’at, herself.  She knew much about the proportions of various plant additives and how to use them.  She and Tatyana began harvesting the latex-like sap from the Flefle, Sol’s Delight, with which to mix Txumpaywll sap as a topical anaesthetic.  She was having difficulty remember the name of Sol’s Delight in Na’vi, though.
  “Kak eto nazyvaetsja? (What do we call it?) asked Alekxsi of herself, in her native tongue of Russian.
  “Vy govorju po-russki?!” (You speak Russian?!)
  “Krra alo oe kefpìl lì’u Na’vi nì’aw!”  (Only the time when I cannot think the word in Na’vi!)  Laughter ensued and a new friendship was born.
   “Topical ointment! I wonder if the sap can be distilled and used in a syringe as …”  Tatyana tossed that idea aside.  There were no syringes on Pandora except at the Blue Heart Gate. 
   “Moe pivlltxe muntxateru Normä, Liri’el . (We should talk to the wife of Norm, Liri’el.) “She’s at Blue Heart Gate now”, Alekxsi added in Russian. 
  Their conversation was interrupted by Ateyo.
  “Fnu!!!”   Ateyo raised her hand to hush them.  “Tìng mikyun!” (Listen!- give ear)
   A low moaning sound was heard throughout the forest. 
   “That sound is danger, but also good food!” explained Ateyo. “Awaiei!”
   “Hawai’i!” exclaimed Ka’alani.   The words were very similar.  “It shoots poison darts, kefyak!?”
  “Nga lu eyawr!” (You are right.)  “Ayoe zene tìkangkem sivi ‘awsìteng fte akxuke 'ì'awn. (We must work together to remain safe.) Ateyo gathered the aysahik around her and explained her plan. “Ayoe zene ngop hawntokx.”
   “We must make body armor!?” blurted Twiti Castillo.
   “Nga lu eyawr. Fìwllil tsun toltem ayngati fa pxiswisawur.”  (You are right. This plant will shoot you all by means of sharp arrow.)
   “Some come in front with HawnTokx, get shooted, other come in back, get seed. OK?!”
   “OH!  You want us to draw fire will others harvest?” Pamela was somewhat excited to be thinking about vegetarian hunting.  “When do we start?! Pehrr sngä’i ayoe?”
 “Nì'awve, ayoe zene ngop hawntokx.  Za’u!” (First we must create protect-body! Come!)

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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #496 on: September 11, 2015, 12:45:49 pm »
495)~Ateyo trouped into camp with the aysahik, each carrying burden baskets. Across from the ylltxep, community fire, came Sharon’s Undersea Renegades.  Fortunately, Payoang and some other Eastern Sea Clan members had already begun roasting fish and other seafood delicacies.
  “Mmmmm!  Syuveru hefi onlor.” (Food smells good!)
   “Ma Tsortsal kolar ayoeti fya’o amip fawoang hawl.” (Georgia has taught us a new manner to prepare fish.)
   “Fya’o Samoana!” Georgia Barnes recognized the rendition of her name, and nodded to Taifa’anae and Tai Tae Ao, the Samoans who inspired the name of their clan, and who had taught the braided wrap fashion of preparing fish.
   But Payoang was also interested in what Ateyo had accomplished with the aysahik that morning.
   “Ma Ateyo!  Srake ngal kolar aysahikit fya’o tìhawl ayu a zeyko?” (Yes/No, You have taught the aysahik the way to prepare things which cause healing?)
   “Srane, ma Payoang. Rä’ä txopu! Ayoeru lu txana ayu fa ayskir nìwotx ziveyko!  (Yes, Fish. Don’t fear. To us is many things for the sake of all wounds, with which to cause healing.)
  “Srane! Ulta fa ayu alahe nìteng!” (Yes and for other things as well!)  exclaimed Ka’alani, as she and Pxepxi were rubbing salve on their bellies to counteract stretch marks.  Kofi was helping to rub salve on his wife’s tummy.
   “Pxepxi!  Prrnenil moeä pxamek oeti!  Srake po lu zayu set?” (Pxepxi! Our baby kicked me! Yes/No he will come now?)
   “Kehe oeyä muntxatan. Poel ke ziva’u fìkrr, slä ner’in. (No, my husband.  He will not come today, but soon.)
   Ateyo nearly forgot the conversation regarding healing salves, realizing that she would soon be a grandmother.  She wasn’t sure what would be her relation to Ka’alani’s child.  Ka’alani was also to be grandmother to Pxepxi and Kofi’s child, so Kofi would become an older brother …  She shook her head to clear her mind.  The two families were related more closely now, no matter how complex.  Ka’alani was laughing and saying words like “grandparents in-law”.                                                                                                                                       “Whatever that means!” thought Ateyo with a grin.
  “Ma S’rron!” said Pamala.  “Ayoel rolun fkxenit fa yom. Srake, new fì’ut?” (We found some vegetables to eat.  Yes/no, you want some?)
  “Srane!” Pamela filled Sharon’s outstretched palms with the fruits she had found. 
  “My thinking!” announced Ateyo.  “We finding Awaiei plant!  Make good food but we all must hunt.”
  “Slä sngä’i ayoe zene ngop hawntokx. (But first, we must create body-protect!)
We have to draw fire so others can sneak behind and harvest the fruit!” exclaimed Pamela.
   Ateyo then launched into her animated description of what was needed to hunt and harvest the seeds from this plant.  Ateyo was explaining how to construct body shields.  She didn’t understand why the mipa Na’vi all laughed when someone said;
  “Riot Shields!”
   “We should use the skin from that Sea Monster we killed a few years ago.”
  “Kehe! Tsatxa’leng solar na kulkuti, Ma Tsmuke.” (No, that skin was used as a house, My Sister.)  Payoang hadn’t learned all the names of the Mipa Na’vi.”
 Payoang noticed that the woman was quite pregnant. “Srake, Ngaru lu prrnen piyähem?!” (Yes/No to you is baby arrive soon?!)
  “Srane! Slä Pxepxiru lu prrnen lisre prrnen oeyä!”  (Yes, but to Pxepxi is baby before my baby!)
 Payoang was caught up in the excitement of the new community.         “KOSMAN! Ayngaru liyu zami’uyu nìpxay! (To you all will be newcomers many. “Ayoe zene sä'eio sayi fpì meprrnen, mipa Na’vi, ulte mipa uran!”  (We must have a ceremony for the sake of two babies, new Na’vi and new boat!)
 Sharon’s ears twitched when she heard the word for boat.
 “Mipa uran, ma Payoang?  Ayoel fpamìl fwa pum layu ‘olo ayngeyä.” (New boat, Ma Payoang? We thought that that one will be for your clan.)
  “Kehe, fìuran lu ayngeyä!  Ayoeru! Slä lekin ayoel ngati kerar pum. ” (No this boat is yours.  To us is sufficient. But we need to teach you all how to build one.)
Payoang wasn’t about to relinquish the floor, now that he had everyone’s attention.
   “Zene aoel nekx kamtseng fayutralit.” (We need to burn the center of those trees.) Ulte zene mun’i nusekx hapxì.  “Ma frapo tsun srung sivi!” (Everyone can help!) Lesngä’i rewon trray ko! (Let’s start tomorrow morning!)
  He got an enthusiastic response from those who were assembled.  He grinned with satisfaction at the ayektan.  When his eyes settled on Ateyo, sitting next to Tai, he began to apologize.
  “Kaw’it, Ma Payoang.  Ayoengil hawntokxit tsun ngop krr alahe.” (Not at all, Ma Payoang.  We can create body-protect another time.)  The idea was to get everyone working together toward a common goal.  Making a boat would suffice.
  “Ma Payoang! Nga lu kanu!  Fìulan syaw KANU! Lesngä’i rewon trray ko!” (Ma Payoang you are smart! This boat is called CANOE! Let’s start tomorrow morning!)

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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #497 on: September 24, 2015, 11:00:32 am »
496)~ “Put some mud right here along the edges.”  Payoang was instructing the others in the method for controlling the burn along the logs which were to become dugout canoes.
   “I thought these were supposed to be dugout canoes, not burnout canoes!” joked Ka’alani. 
   “Don’t worry, oeyä muntxate ahona!” assured Taifa’ana’i.  “We will chop out the burned portions, once we’ve made the fire. First we need to make these mud dams along the edges. Then burn, then chop.” Taifa’ana’i was proud to be learning the skills of building a canoe.  He had always intended to join the workshops on Samoan traditions before he joined the RDA.  How many lifetimes ago was that?  He smiled at his pregnant wife as she emptied the shell full of mud along her edge.  He was worried for Ka’alani to be involved with the construction project, but she was insistent.
   Even though Ka’alani and Pxepxi were large with child, they still found ways of participating.  They were busy patting mud along the edge of the  log to create a channel down the middle.  Narate Shepard, also, was delighted to find a task appropriate for her twins.  The youngsters were packing mud into large seashells and trotting them over to Narate and Payoang.  There were a number of teams situated along the length of each log, creating mud dams.
   The heaviest tasks were already performed.  The logs had been painstakingly chopped into rough canoe shapes.  Several times, the logs had to be rolled from side-to-side while the canoe shapes were chopped.  Where the logs had been burned to make the trees fall, the pointed shape of the nose was nearly formed.  Taifa’ and his son Kofi, were shaping the nose of the canoe.  Of course, chopping the burned portions insured that they were covered in soot from head to toe.  This was evidenced by the black handprints they left on the tummies of their pregnant wives!
  Payoang was pleasantly surprised to have found people skillful enough with stone tools to help with the shaping.   He had supposed that NONE of them would be useful.  He was equally surprised to learn from Tai Tae Ao that her ancestors on ‘Rrta had once built canoes such as these.  He had been brought to tears to learn that others had supplanted their traditions with  Tek Nol Otsi, and many of her people now feared their own Txampay (Great Water. He could not easily say Ocean. It sounded more like Oh Tsun!) Reflecting upon their conversation, Payoang could now understand why Tai and Taifa’ were each adamant, that the Na’vi traditions were learned by all, even though some had suggested that items could be easily crafted using Tek Nol Otsi.  Payoang also began to realize why they had named their clan, Olo’Samoana.  Samoa was the name of their homeland on ‘Rrta.  In this manner they were reclaiming some of their own lost traditions.   
  Tai was helping Payoang hollow out the interior segment of one canoe.  She stood up from within, to stretch out her sore muscles, and was confused by the ensuing laughter. Tweety Castillo, Ateyo’s half-sister among the Avatars, was exclaiming;
   “Ma Tai luke fìl! Peyä tokx lu alayonopin!” (Tai is without stripes.  Her body is painted black!)
   “Pe’uteri lu plltxe, Ma Tsmuke? Lu fìl oer, tse’a?” (What thing are you talking about, My Sister? To me is stripes, see?)  Tai vaulted out of the canoe and proceded to hug her half-sister-in-law, effectively transferring large portions of carbon onto Twiti’s skin.
The laugh was on Twiti and so was the soot.  Arm in arm, they both approached the area of the beach where all the aysahik had lain out their blankets, or skins rather.  Tai could see that Ateyo was just finishing the application of burn ointment to the bottoms of someone’s feet.
   “Ma ’Teyo!” pleaded Tai as she approached.  “New ngeyä mesokx azeyko.” (I need your two healing hands.)
   “Nìlun, ngeyä hona tsamsiyu alor!” (Of course, my adorable warrior, which is beautiful!)  She got up and spun around towards Tai, too late to realize that her muntxate was covered in black ash.  She was enveloped in the taller woman’s arms and was surprised to receive a VERY demonstrative hug. Everyone was roaring with laughter. Tweety explained,
  “Set ngaru le mesokx alayno mìtxìm ngeyä!” (Now you have two black hands on your butt!)
  Ateyo made a pantomome of trying to crane her neck around to see her own behind, thus disguising her embarrassment with comedy.  She gave up and motioned Tai to lay down, to which she complied while laughing.  Ateyo was not one to hold a grudge.  Lovingly she applied the ointment in circles on her muntxate’s sore shoulders and back.  Of course, people generally had rinsed off in the lagoon before getting a massage. And of course, the massage ointment was created using animal fat as an emollient.  And of course, that caused the black soot to become somewhat waterproof.  Ateyo signed her masterpiece by applying her own handprints to Taiyä txìm! It was quite awhile later that Ateyo presented Tai with a soap that would effectively remove her oily tattoos!
  Just before sundown, Syulang Aean climbed to the top of Slotted Cave and sounded the conch shell horn.  The tools were all laid aside and people who had just finished working, rinsed themselves off in the lagoon.  When the horn sounded once more, all turned to the West and raised their arms in salute to the Tsawke (sun) as it slipped quietly into the sea.  Everyone then trooped over to the ylltxep to share the evening meal. Afterwards, they returned to the lagoon, just to sit or float and relax in the warm water.  The Laughing Sea Creatures were happy to see their friends each night and welcomed them to climb upon their backs.
   There was something magical about the warm water and sparkling sea weeds and twinkling sea shells.  Couples languidly embraced, floating and drifting in the water.  Narate’s twins were quick to point out,
  “Fraporu lu mowan fìtsap!” (Everyone has desire for each other!)  Ateyo and Tai were reminded of Pxepxi’s constant and annoying) proclaimations of their love when she was a bit younger.
   Ka’alani was giggling.
   “Pe’uleri herangham ngati, Ma Sanu?” (What are you laughing about, Mom?) asked Kofi.
   “There was a place in Hawai’i called Ala Mowana Bay. I think this lagoon should be called Alu Mowana Bay, nìteng!”   Taifa’ and Tai and the technician by name of James Kalewai,  and the UnderSea Renegades who were once residents of/and under Hawai’i  caught the play on words.  All the amorous couples were too engrossed in each other to care.
  “Why not?” piped Sharon. She had once been a professor of Marine Biology and Physics from the University of Hawai’i.  “There was a place just past Makaha on the South Shore called Pray for Sex Beach!”
   Everyone within earshot brayed with laughter.  But her cousin, the big Samoan called Taifa’ane’i, shook his head and said,
   “Sheesh!  I can’t take you ANYWHERE!”
   Laughing sea creatures nudged the tired Na’vi.  They each seemed to chose their own riders.  As tsaheylu was established between each Na’vi and sea creature, the aytolfìn were shocked to realize how tired the Na’vi were.  Images were shared of canoe building, and projected fishing was visualized.
  The sea creatures were puzzled.  They tried to question the necessity of such a thing.  Ateyo tried to demonstrate the difficulty for Na’vi bodies to swim through the water, catching fish in their teeth.   Ateyo’s images made all creatures laugh.  The aytolfìn tried to project sympathy toward the Na’vi, the Na’vi tried to project a sense of satisfaction at their ability to overcome their lack of biological marine propulsion.  Aytolfìn seemed to accept their different-ness and simply projected loving, healing energy.  All creatures relaxed in the lagoon, with many of the Pandoran moons visible overhead, with glimmering stars above and below.

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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #498 on: October 10, 2015, 12:01:24 pm »
497)~  The two teams of builders and paddlers were trundling their new creations down from the slope that came to the edge of the beach. UnderSea Renegades who had come to be known as Olo’ äoTxampay (Clan Under the Ocean) and  also Olo’Samoana, the Clan of which Tai and Ateyo belonged, proudly brought their canoes to the edge of the beach from the surrounding forest.
   Rolling the canoes on tree trunks upon the trampled path was not too difficult.  High tide and gravity assisted in getting the canoes off the slope and onto the beach.  But once the canoes had entered the water of the lagoon, a great cheer went up.  PXAY WO!  (water launch)
  Festivity was in the air. Pxepxi and Ka’alani  had festooned everyone with colorful leis, in the Hawai’ian tradition.  Even the boats were draped in garlands of exotic color.   All those who were not launching the two new canoes had waded into the warm lagoon, singing of Eywa and the Txampay, singing of prosperity and future, and singing in anticipation of great feasts.
   During the previous days, singers invented songs with simple melodies, which were echoed by the clans. 
Za’ärìp!\(Pull!)
   KO!\ (LET’S)
Za’ärìp!\(Pull!)
   KO! \ (LET’S)
‘Awsìteng Za’ärìp\(Altogether pull!)
   KO! \ (LET’S)
This became a repetitive refrain.  It surprised everyone else to hear Syulang Aean sing a strong melody in counterpoint.  She was simply remembering the song of paddlers from her own, recently destroyed island.
‘Awsìteng nìwotx\ All together
Txura aypun\Strong arms
Tsawsngema pun\Muscular arms
Pamsteo seiyi ‘ekong\Playing the rhythm
‘Ekong txampayur\The rhythm of the ocean
‘Ekong tìreyä\ The rhythm of life

Aytolfìn joined in the fun, leaping and twirling and chattering in voices much like Earth Dolphins once had. 
   Ka’alani was thinking that the song and the occasion were very much like the re-enactments she had seen and heard at the Polynesian Cultural Center in Hawai’i.  In those days, everyone seemed to be desperately aware that their lives were being quickly erased by climate going out of control.  She still had her recordings on her Flash Drive Cube.  She hadn’t been able to hear them once she had left her quarters at Blue Heart Gate.  She wondered if the Playback Machine was still functioning and whether anyone still used it.  These thoughts flashed in her mind in an instant.
   Meanwhile, she was brought nearly to tears to hear the harmonies which sprung with seeming spontaneity from the voices of the the Na’vi who had flown in from the Ikran Clan of the Eastern Sea.  She almost dismissed her tears as a result of her own pregnancy, and the wildly fluctuating hormones.  But truthfully, she was swept into the realization that her past was Past. 
   But this new culture was somewhat Polynesian and very Na’vi.  Her baby and Pxepxi’s would be raised in a dual-culture.  She hoped it didn’t offend the Na’vi, themselves.  She was hoping that Living in the Balance, Rey’eng, would suffice to cause their acceptance. She allowed the voices to envelop her in joyfulness and hope.
   It was then that she heard a sharp gasp from Pxepxi.
  Kofi had heard her gasp as well and had vaulted from the canoe with such suddenness, that he rocked the heavy boat violently.
  “Srake set za’u prrnen mengä? (Yes/No, now comes our baby?)
  “Srane!” came a chorus of voices echoed by the excited voices of the aytolfin. 
   “AIIIIIIIII!” cried Pxepxi as Ka’alani and Kofi flanked her in the chest-deep water.  The aysahik gathered around and the women from the other clans came closer.  Encircling them all swam the Laughing Sea Creatures , but the One who had befriended Pxepxi swam to the inner circle.  Vaguely, Pxepxi was aware of the humming and chanting of the aysahik, sending messages soothing and supportive.  Pxepxi gave ashout as the infant within turned suddenly.  Reflexively she drew up her knees and in that instant the infant emerged in a gush, moving from one warm, liquid environment to another.
 Tsahik Alekxsi was there to catch the infant and bring it to the surface for its first breath of Pandoran air.  She had caught a number of infants in the waters of her Old Island.  This was the first such event in their new clan and new home.  It didn’t surprise her when a tolfìn emerged from the crowd.
   The old female tolfìn, Pxepxi’s friend, nudged her way past all the women and swam directly to the infant.  She performed the honor of snipping the umbilical cord which Alekxsi had presented.  Alekxsi wiped away the bloody tracery which had remained clinging to the infant and presented the infant to Pxepxi. Kofi crowded in as well.
  “Vola zekwa ulte vola venzek! (Eight fingers and Eight toes!)  Pum ‘eve!  Oeyä prrnen lu ‘eve!”  (It’s a GIRL! My baby is a GIRL!)
   “Moeyä Prrnen, Ma Kofi! laughed Pxepxi!  (Our Baby!)
   A spontaneous cheer went up, aytolfìn danced on the water and leapt for joy, sixty voices proclaimed her beauty and asked what she would be named.  The mipa Na’vi exclaimed at the lack of labor time, the Na’vi women were puzzled by the word and the entire concept.
   “Fyape fko syaw poer?” (How will she be called?) the voices all asked.
   “Moel ke pole’un,”  (We have not decided) stated Pxepxi.
  “Kxawm moel tìng tstxoti poer krra mipa Na’vi  ulte prrnen Ka’alani layu syaw. (Perhaps we will give name to her at time which New Na’vi and Ka’alani’s child will be named.)
     “Sä'eoio a mipa olo’!” exclaimed Taifa. (A ritual for our new clan!)

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Re: ATEYO TeSYAKSYUK: TSULFATU
« Reply #499 on: October 22, 2015, 12:37:49 pm »
498)~”Ftxozä seiyi ko!” Let’s celebrate, shouted Payoang, standing in the prow of his dugout canoe.
   “Fnu!  Prrnen lu herahaw!” Be quiet, the baby is sleeping. Came many hushed voices in reprimand.  The infant was not sleeping, but the gathered crowd was very protective.
 ”Ftxozä seiyi ko!” repeated Payoang in a hoarse whisper, as he ducked his head in apology.
  “Kehe! Ftxozä sangi ko!” (sad celebration) said Luke Penn, one of the paddlers who had accompanied Payoang from the Ikran Clan of the Eastern Sea.  “Ayngaru lu Kava ketam.” (To us is not enough Kava.) Somehow, the Samoan word for the intoxicant had become the accepted substitute for the original Na’vi word, now since forgotten by many.
   Payoang interjected, “Tse, Eyktan Atumopin fpole’ naer oehu.”  (Well, Red Painted Leader has sent drink with me.)
  “Slä, ‘it nì’aw.” (But only a small amount.) was the counter reply.
 “ ‘Awa swawtsyìp!” (Just a moment!) spoke Tsahik Alekxsi.  She didn’t have to shout.  Her voice carried a note of authority which commanded attention.  “Ma Moa’til oeti wamìntxu a wyll a eyawr sar fpi Kava ngop.  Ulte omum oe peseng run pum!”  (Mo’at showed me the correct plant to use for the sake of creating Kava. And I know where to find it!)
   Tsahik Syulang Aean, from the Volcanic Island, added, “Tsafnel tsunlu näk rä’ä kin nìpey a krr.” (That type of drink does not need a wait time.)  She was.of course, referring to the fermentation cycle.   The roots of this plant contained a potent hallucinagenic. 
   Tai waded forwarded with Ateyo by her side.  “Meuia moer srung siyi run ulte ngop Kava fpi aungeyä prrnen.”  (It would be my honor to find and create Kava for the sake of our baby.  She had no idea if there was a word for GrandChild, but she felt this would be a likely contribution toward for her new clan, Olo’Samoanä. “ ‘Awlie miSamoa lamu oeyä meuia ngop Kava sä'eoio.”  (Once upon a time in Samoa, it was my honor to create Kava ritual.)  It seemed so long ago. But the roots of those pepper plants in Samoa also had contained a strong hallucinogenic. She wondered how similar this Pandoran plant would be.  Tai glanced around at the crowd with pleasure and noticed that Payoand was gesturing emphatically toward the two new dug out canoes. Tai realized she had skipped the other important event.  “Ulte ftxozä seiyi aungeyä mipa meuran!” (And to celebrate our two new boats!)
  Ateyo clapped her hands together authoritatively. “Pum KO!” she announced, which was as much to say, Let’s do this!
   Suddenly, everyone seemed to be heading to dry land, yet Pxepxi and Kofi lingered in the lagoon, long enough for the satisfaction of the aytolfìn.  They swam circles around the new family, squeeking and squawking much as Earth dolphins once had done.  One with a discerning ear might have realized that as each one touched the infant with its’ forehead, they each made an identical sound --- indeed, they had named the child in their own tongue.  Roughly translated, it meant, Two-Legged Dolfin.  The baby cooed happily, and the little family emerged from the water.  Gravity seemed to resist their departure, but they climbed onto the shore, Kofi steadying Pxepxi and their precious burden until she gained her equilibrium.
   They were escorted to a seat on a log near the yllyxep, communal fire.  As they became dry, aysahik and others crowded around, complimenting and cooing as adults are wont to do in the presense of babies.     
Pxepxi was entirely absorbed with this tiny little person who had come of her own prrku (womb. literally-baby house) In truth, she felt more than a little awkward in regard to her care.  Ateyo, though an excellent parent and caretaker had never raised infants.  Ateyo was at a loss and was grateful that Meykir’ìte from Olo’Zongtseng Alor had come for the Canoe Launching Ceremony and had decided to stay.  Also, Narate Shepard had her twins, and several of the women from the Hidden Base/Zongtseng Alor clan had experience raising children.  So Pxepxi was not as isolated as Ateyo had feared.  As a matter of fact, there seemed to be a Motherhood Clan that superseded all other clans.  These women were constantly around Pxepxi. Ateyo was puzzled to feel somewhat left out of the camaraderie of these women and had welcomed a chance to escape. This came as an expedition leader for the purpose of acquiring swaddling.
   She could have chosen to accompany the aysahik in their search for the intoxicant plant, but she chose a task which would interact more closely with her daughter and the new baby.
   Much later, Ateyo, with Kofi and his friends from Ay Es Vi S’rraltayä (Shiralta’s ISV) approached the Common Area, carrying several armloads of large, soft blue leaves known as EanEan.  The largest made great blankets, cloaks, and sleeping bags, the smallest were useful as bandages, washing cloths, hygienic wipes, and, of course, diapers.
  “Aii!  Faya lu pxeya! Ayuìri oe irayo seiyi, Ma eylan!” (These are many!  As for these things I thank you, Friends) Pxepxi was a little overwhelmed by the large volume of leaves. “Poe lu prrnen ahì’ì nì’aw!”  (She is only a small baby.)
   “Txansan, Ma hona ‘ìte!” (Wonderful, my adorable daughter), said Ateyo. Ayoe zamolunge tam EanEan frapor.  Natkenong Ma Tatyanal new ngop aylew ayskxirit fa EanEan.  (We have brought enough Eanean for everybody.  For example, Tatyana needs to make wound covers [bandages] by means of EanEan,” offered Ateyo.
   “Ulte sunu oer tìkan EanEanur ngop tewngit alunta zir fkan ahewne! (And I prefer EanEan as a loincloth because it is so soft!)  And Kofi displayed his new soft blue tewng by means of swaying his hula hips in a mildly erotic fashion, simply for the benefit of watching Pxepxi blush a lovely shade of lavender.
   Once the whooping and laughing had subsided, Pxepxi offered a suggestion to her young husband.
  “Tam tam, ma hona srewyu!” (Enough, enough! my adorable dancer!) “Slä set ngal zene ngop tewngit prrnenä.” (But now you must create a baby’s loincloth!)
   “Srane, nìlun! Ma Naratel kolar oer fyao lew si prrnenä txìmit! Oel aynati wìntxu!”  (Yes, of course!  Narate has taught me the manner to cover a baby’s butt. I will show you.) With a flourish, he snagged a leaf and caused it to flutter to the ground as the baby blanket.  He grabbed an appropriate sized leaf as a diaper and removed the stem halfway, and lay this upon the blanket.  He danced over to his wife and tenderly claimed his child.  He held her cradled in one arm, gazing into those eyes. Ah! Faya Menari! (Ah Those Two Eyes.)  He danced a gentle hula and lay her upon the blanket.  He cleaned her and wiped her and smoothed fish oil onto her bottom.  He placed her upon the split leaf and twirled the cut ends in his fingers to make a soft string.  In a deft movement, he had wrapped the strings around her little ketxze (tail) and drew them in front, tying them across the leaf around her tummy. He was so enthralled with his Little One that he didn’t even hear the words of approval from the Motherhood Crowd and from his young friends.
  “Txantsan, Ma Kofi. Krra muìa, ngal kar ayoeti nìwotx!” laughed Ewan Owan. (Wonderful, Kofi.  When the time is right, you can teach all of us!)  Truly, the young man had not even thought of dating, let alone marrying and having children. But he was suitably impressed with Kofi’s exotic skill of diapering a baby.
   “Tse, Ma Owen!  Meyä ‘Ite leyku fyentu, krra ngal ftxey muntxateti!” (Our daughter will be adult when you choose a wife!) chided Pxepxi. Owen only shook his head and laughed.  It seemed to him that these two were barely past puberty, yet they were married and had a baby! 
“Srake, sunu ngar meyam prrnen meyä?” said Kofi.  (Yes/No, you want to hold our baby?) Owen was hesitant.  Would it be an insult to refuse?  He had no interest in babies. Carefully, he took the infant and was surprised to be met with the intense gaze of her two huge eyes.  Subconsciously, he had expected the eyes to be shut, like a newborn nantang pup.
  “Poe lu alor,” he murmured. “She’s beautiful. What will you name her? Um. Fyape fko poru syaw?” (How does one call her?)
  Her little fists were waving in the air and she had a perplexed look on her face.  Identifying neither Pxepxi not Kofi, she let out a little squall.  Poor Owen looked aghast. Kofi rescued his babe and placed her into Pxepxi’s arms.
   “Oe ke omum,” Kofi admitted.  (I don’t know.) “Sla moel tstxoti pe’un ye'rìn.” (But we will decide a name soon.)
  “You could name her after the last queen in Hawai’i, Queen Liliuokalani.”  suggested Ka’alani.  “And you could call her Lili, for short!”
   The infant decided there was too much talk and not enough feeding and made her desires know with insistent cries.
   “Ayoe livawk fì’u krr alahe!” said Pxepxi as she focused her attention on breastfeeding her child. (We will discuss this later.) Everyone politely turned their attentions elsewhere, Kofi shooed off the young men and even some of the women drifted away.  He sat next to his little family and gazed upon the infant voraciously suckling at Pxepxi’s breast.  They were in tsaheylu, so deeply bonded that he dared not voice his opinion.
Poer syivaw Ohakx!  She should be called Hunger.  Pxepxi caught the silly grin on his face from the corner of her eye.  She chose to believe he was reveling in the joy of Fatherhood.

 

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