Author Topic: Chevron being called out for their mess in Ecuador  (Read 3723 times)

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Offline Toruk Makto

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Offline Txonä Unil Stä'nìyu Rolyusì

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Re: Chevron being called out for their mess in Ecuador
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2011, 03:05:24 pm »
How alarming and disgusting! I can't believe that. Chevron is all I fill my car with. Well...was. It's going to be hard to find fuel as good as Chevron's but I'm not going to do business with a company like this. Petition signed.

-Txonä Rolyu




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Offline Toruk Makto

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Re: Chevron being called out for their mess in Ecuador
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2011, 02:34:53 pm »
The delegation of Ecuadorians to the United States to confront Chevron – a company found guilty
of deliberately polluting and poisoning the rainforest and its inhabitants – is in full swing!




After some productive meetings with officials and media in New York City, the team has moved on to Washington, D.C. Today they will meet with organizational allies and international press. Tomorrow they will sit down with representatives from the U.S. Congress, and next week the showdown with Chevron will happen in San Ramon, and we are building momentum for that moment.

This could not happen without your support and we need to keep that support growing. Please give directly to the delegation costs by going to http://causes.com/stopchevron.

Throughout the delegation, one of the courageous delegates, Servio Curipoma, a cacao farmer, is sharing his powerful story in every meeting. Servio lost both his parents to Chevron's toxic contamination and his journey is a challenging one, to say the least.

Please watch this video from the Causes page – a powerful look into the life of one man – and another example of how Chevron (formerly Texaco) turned the northeastern Ecuadorian Amazon into a crude oil wasteland.

Once you have seen the video please support our Causes project and tell all of your friends and colleagues.

We must work together to defend the Amazon and make Chevron clean up its toxic mess in Ecuador!

Han Shan


Han Shan
Coordinator, Clean Up Ecuador Campaign

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Offline Toruk Makto

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Re: Chevron being called out for their mess in Ecuador
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2011, 03:18:10 pm »
I received the preceding via email today.

In my opinion though, all of the big oil companies are guilty of destruction of our environment in one way or another. I cringe to think of how much damage has been done all over the world that we don't even know about, because the result is so bad that information is being deliberately suppressed by these companies.

Of anywhere on earth that stands the most to lose from this reckless and willful destruction, the Amazon basin stands vulnerable at the top. For every Servio Curipoma that steps forward to hold these companies accountable, there are likely thousands of other people and hundreds of other illegal abandoned oil production sites in the Amazon that we will never even know about. Many of those probably much worse than the damage in NE Ecuador.

Hopefully this will be the first of a wave of actions brought by the indigenous of the Amazon. For my part, I am bringing this information to as many people as I can and contributing financially as much as I can. I urge all LearnNavi members to do the same.

ta Markì

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Offline 'Oma Tirea

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Re: Chevron being called out for their mess in Ecuador
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2011, 12:06:53 am »
Ke tsun spivaw fì'ut... >:(

Signed.

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Offline Toruk Makto

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Re: Chevron being called out for their mess in Ecuador
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2011, 05:46:38 pm »
Received via email today:

Less than 48 hours before oil giant Chevron's shareholder meeting, activists from Amazon Watch and our allies at Rainforest Action Network (RAN) have rappelled from the deck of the Richmond Bridge over the San Francisco Bay to hang a 1500-square foot banner proclaiming:
"Chevron Guilty: Clean Up the Amazon!"



Activists from RAN and Amazon Watch are dangling from the massive banner – which is anchored to the bridge deck – creating a spectacular sight adjacent to Chevron's polluting refinery in Richmond, CA.

As Chevron escalates its abusive tactics to evade accountability in Ecuador, supporters of the communities in the Amazon are escalating their efforts in solidarity with the men, women, and children who continue to suffer the toxic legacy of the oil giant in their rainforest lands.

"I've seen with my own eyes the devastation Chevron caused in the Ecuadorian Amazon, and it's long past time for the company to clean up its toxic legacy there," said Thomas Cavanagh of Amazon Watch. "And until Chevron does the right thing, we will stand with the Ecuadorian communities fighting for justice."

You can help support the delegation, too. Please join our Facebook Cause today!


Han Shan
Coordinator, Clean Up Ecuador Campaign

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Re: Chevron being called out for their mess in Ecuador
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2011, 05:53:48 pm »
We consumers of petrol are literally the 'driving force' behind this kind of thing.  :(
Please tell me if you see mistakes in a Na'vi post of mine. It's the only way I'll learn. :P

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Re: Chevron being called out for their mess in Ecuador
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2011, 12:36:09 am »
Worst yet it seems hard to stop ourselves :( :(

Zene ayoe kivame fte vivar rivey...

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Offline Toruk Makto

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Re: Chevron being called out for their mess in Ecuador
« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2011, 12:38:33 pm »


Last week, it was announced that a major international oil company accepted responsibility for massive contamination affecting poor villagers in a remote part of a developing country, promising to pay for clean-up, and compensation to the communities harmed.

Stop the presses! Has Chevron finally done the right thing in Ecuador?

Actually, it wasn't Chevron in Ecuador, but Shell in Nigeria.



In response to a class action lawsuit filed against the company on behalf of tens of thousands of people in the Ogoniland region of the Niger Delta, Shell formally accepted responsibility for two massive oil spills that devastated farmland and mangroves, and flowed into a large network of creeks and inlets, poisoning the drinking water and destroying the livelihood of this fishing community.

For those familiar with Chevron's toxic legacy in Ecuador, it all sounds very familiar, except for the part where the oil company accepts responsibility. It's time for that to change.

Today is International Day of the World's Indigenous People, as proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly. On this special day, please join us in standing with the oil-ravaged indigenous communities of the Ecuadorian Amazon by calling on Chevron – literally – to demand "enough's enough, time to pay up for a clean-up."

Please join our mass call-in to Chevron today!

Pick up the phone, call Chevron's California Headquarters, and tell them, "if Shell can do it in Nigeria, Chevron can do it in Ecuador."

  •    Call Chevron: 925-842-3232 (from outside the U.S., use country code +001)
  •    Tell the Chevron representative (or voicemail) that you've learned that Shell is taking responsibility for their pollution in Nigeria and you're calling to demand Chevron to do the same in Ecuador.
  •    Be polite. Ask your friends and family to join you in calling too. If possible, let us know what they say at news@amazonwatch.org.

On International Day of the World's Indigenous People, we thank you for speaking out in support of our indigenous partners in Ecuador and beyond, and for all people in the Amazon fighting for a healthy and just planet.

For justice,

Han Shan
Coordinator, Clean Up Ecuador Campaign

P.S. – Shell's acceptance of liability for two oil spills is a long way from justice for the people of the Niger Delta, who have suffered too long from the environmental devastation and human rights abuses accompanying oil production in their lands. Chevron is also a major operator in Nigeria, with its own abuses to account for. For more information on oil in the Niger Delta, including the findings of a new UN report, visit Environmental Rights Action (Friends of the Earth, Nigeria).

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Offline Toruk Makto

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Re: Chevron being called out for their mess in Ecuador
« Reply #9 on: September 21, 2011, 12:21:22 pm »
http://amazonwatch.org/news/2011/0920-us-court-rules-against-chevron-in-ecuador-oil-case

US Court Rules Against Chevron in Ecuador Oil Case
September 20, 2011 | Source: BBC News

A US court has overturned a block on Ecuadoreans collecting damages totalling $18.2 billion from Chevron over Amazon oil pollution.

The order reversed a previous judge's ruling that froze enforcement of the fine outside Ecuador.

But it is not the end of the legal saga, which is also going through the courts in Ecuador.

Texaco, which merged with Chevron in 2001, was accused of dumping toxic materials in the Ecuadorean Amazon.

In February, an Ecuadorean court ruled that Chevron should pay to clean up pollution, awarding damages of more than $9bn as well as punitive damages of more than $8bn.

But Chevron, which argues that this judgement was fraudulent, successfully appealed to a New York judge to have collection of the fine blocked.

That decision was overturned on Monday, when the Second US Circuit Court of Appeals in New York lifted the injunction.
"Toxic dumps"

"We can now at least dream there will be justice and compensation for the damage, the environmental crime, committed by Chevron in Ecuador," lead lawyer for the plaintiffs, Pablo Fajardo, told the Associated Press.

However, the plaintiffs have agreed not to attempt to collect the damages until the appeals process is completed in Ecuador.

Chevron has challenged the fine, arguing that lawyers and supporters of the indigenous groups who brought the case conspired to fabricate evidence.

"Chevron remains confident that once the full facts are examined, the fraudulent judgement will be found unenforceable and those who procured it will be required to answer for their misconduct," a company statement said.

The lawsuit was brought on behalf of 30,000 Ecuadoreans, in a case which has dragged on for years.

Ecuadorean indigenous groups said Texaco dumped more than 18 billion gallons of toxic materials into unlined pits and rivers between 1972 and 1992.

But Chevron says Texaco spent $40m cleaning up the area during the 1990s, and signed an agreement with Ecuador in 1998 absolving it of any further responsibility.

Last month, international arbitrators ordered the Ecuadorean government to pay $96m to Chevron because Ecuador's courts had violated international law as a result of delays in resolving commercial disputes involving Texaco.


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Offline Toruk Makto

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Re: Chevron being called out for their mess in Ecuador
« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2012, 12:58:38 pm »
From Amazon Watch:

Chevron Found Guilty in Ecuador - Again!
Huge Victory for Plaintiffs as Appeals Court
Affirms $18 Billion Pollution Judgment



We've lost so many people in the community, and
it's a shame they couldn't be with us to hear the good news."

– Humberto Piaguaje, community representative

Did you hear the stellar news ringing in 2012? The 18-year legal battle over Chevron's horrific legacy of pollution in the Ecuadorian Amazon has just taken a major step toward justice, as an appeals court ratified an earlier court levying an $18 billion judgment against the company.

The decision gives hope to some 30,000 indigenous people and farmers who have been seeking a cleanup of toxic waste sites, clean drinking water and adequate health care.

Ecuadorians have won a big victory, but the campaign is far from over.

Chevron has made clear what its response will be – more legal stonewalling. The company is mustering ever-larger armies of international lawyers to try to drag the case out in as many legal forums as possible. In the Ecuadorian case alone, Chevron submitted 220,000 pages of documents and 64,000 chemical samples, in what the judges complained was an attempt to physically overwhelm the legal process.

And of course the company is still waging a public-relations offensive in the United States, with its spokespeople spinning the story in a desperate attempt to make the company seem like the victim of greedy Ecuadorians and their U.S. supporters.



Unfortunately for Chevron's flacks and lawyers, such excuses are pretty lame.

Amazon Watch has been helping lead the campaign for justice in Ecuador for years, but we must admit we do feel for Chevron at such a fraught moment. So much so that we've teamed up with our friends at Rainforest Action Network to help the company be a bit more imaginatively shameless and callous. Won't you join us?

Here's your challenge: Go to this page, pick your favorite Chevron spokesperson, enter the most deliciously outrageous excuse you can conjure up, and we'll post it to our "Excuse Gallery" on ChevronThinksWereStupid.org.

While your creative juices are flowing, Amazon Watch is on the ground in Ecuador, and in the weeks ahead we'll be bringing you more news from the 30,000 rainforest dwellers who just won this historic victory. As always, thanks for your continued support and stay tuned...

In Solidarity,

Robert Collier
Corporate Campaigns Director

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Offline Toruk Makto

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Re: Chevron being called out for their mess in Ecuador
« Reply #11 on: April 30, 2012, 10:50:12 pm »
 Here is an interesting insight into the Chevron/Ecuador issue from a guy named Michael that is relatively close to the action and knows what's going on. Following is an excerpt from emails I have recently traded with him. The conversation started with an email that was forwarded to me from one of the commercial lawyers on Chevron's team. I then asked Michael to provide a balancing viewpoint.

 Here is our conversation:


First Email from the lawyer:
-----------------------------------------
The case is against Texaco. Chevron merged with Texaco in 2001. But Texaco pulled out of Ecuador many, many years
prior to that when the government seized and took over Western oil companies' oil production operations in Ecuador.
This happened in many Latin American countries, including Mexico and Venezuela.

 After the government took over operation of those oil production activities, the government's operations were
incompetent because they didn't have the technology and know how to do it correctly.  As a result, the Ecuadorian
government f****d up and caused all of this pollution that they're now suing US oil companies for, including Chevron
(because Chevron later took over Texaco).

 When Texaco pulled out, the Ecuadorian government even signed releases acknowledging that Texaco had remediated and
cleaned up any pollution that Texaco had caused.  The pollution that exists today is because the Ecuadorian government
was so incompetent in IT'S operations after Texaco left.  And now it's suing Chevron to pay the government and to pay
Ecuadorians for the pollution caused by the incompetence of the Ecuadorian government itself.  The Ecuadorian government
would never admit to its own people that it is responsible for all of the current pollution, sickness and environmental
damage that exists today.

 You shouldn't believe anything that comes out of the Ecuadorian press or that is said by the Ecuadorian government.  I
know Ecuador is a beautiful country, but its government is the government of a Third World Banana Republic. Just like
every other country in Central America.
-----------------------------------------

My query to Michael:
-----------------------------------------
     I received the above email forwarded to me from a Chevron lawyer. He says that the worst of the pollution exhibited occurred after the Ecuadorian government  nationalized Texaco assets for Petroecuador in the early 1990s and attempted to operate those assets without sufficient expertise. Although his rhetoric about crooked courts is a bit much, I have researched his statement and the timeline matches. [Can you provide some insight?]


Micheal's response:
-----------------------------------------
Hello -

It is correct that Texaco's operations in Ecuador ended in 1990, but its assets were not "nationalized" (their concession expired and they voluntarily left the consortium - nothing like the Mexican oil expropriation way back in 1938 or more recent nationalizations in Venezuela). At that point Texaco had been the sole operator of these operations for 26 years, which makes them legally (and actually) responsible for any contamination that happened during that period. They signed an agreement with the (then very Chevron-friendly) national government that allowed them to only clean up 37.5% of the contaminated sites, and they obtained a release from the government in 1998 after spending about $40 million to "clean up" these sites.

It's also true that Petroecuador has also caused contamination of the region in the time since they took over much of what Texaco left behind, although they have argued that much of this was due to Texaco leaving behind infrastructure that was designed to pollute and generally shoddy. Petroecuador [has been criticized] also for spills and other bad behavior, and we certainly won't give them a free pass in the future. But Petroecudaor's crimes don't absolve Chevron/Texaco of their own guilt, and in this region they are clearly the main (and original) offender.

I imagine that the above-mentioned facts are the things that coincide with the timeline that you were reviewing, but they don't affect the plaintiffs' case at all. And the Chevron lawyer makes a number of other assertions that are plainly false and have nothing to do with this timeline. For example, he says that Petroecuador is responsible for pollution in this area, and that it happened after Texaco left. This was obviously a major issue in the trial, and it is a legitimate one that needed to be resolved in order to determine who is responsible for this specific contamination. And it has been resolved, following years of scientific studies and many thousands of samples. In fact, most of the evidence that convicted Chevron was actually provided by them to the court. There are many contaminated sites that were studied, for example, where Petroecuador has never operated (only Texaco did). These sites are in the same condition that Texaco left them in, and they are horribly toxic and polluted. And in many other cases it has been possible to distinguish new contamination (where it has existed) from Texaco's contamination using forensic science methods. Chevron would like to act as if this is some sort of unknowable allegation due to the passage of time, but this is not the case and the evidence makes that clear. Remember also that the case against Texaco was first filed in 1993 (only three years after they'd left Ecuador, and five years before they claim to have finished their "clean-up"), and much of the evidence was collected back then - before anyone could claim that this was Petroecuador's pollution.

Chevron also frequently misrepresents their "clean-up" in the 1990's and the release that they obtained from the government in 1998. Firstly, their clean-up was a sham (they essentially just covered pits of toxic sludge with dirt and called it a day), and even now most of those "remediated" sites are severely contaminated. And secondly, the release that they obtained was explicit in that it does not apply to private citizens (and this has been repeatedly ratified by several courts). This "release" was essentially a contract among the parties who had previously made up the consortium that operated these sites, and the people who live in this area were not parties to it and objected at the time (as they wanted their homeland to be actually cleaned up). So they can't claim this technicality as a "get out of jail free" card against a private class action, and the courts have never doubted that fact.

When the case was originally filed in New York in 1993, Texaco argued that this was not the proper forum for the case and that it should be tried instead in Ecuador. This is historically the way that misbehaving multinationals avoid facing justice for crimes they may have committed, since the other side rarely has the resources or ability to begin the case all over again in another nation. And they were confident that the political atmosphere in Ecuador was favorable to them, since at the time the government was their ally (and coincidentally, Ecuador's justice system was considered considerably more corrupt than it is now). In order to get the New York case dismissed, Texaco filed motion after motion praising the Ecuadorian court system and signed an agreement to abide by any decision from Ecuador. But then the plaintiffs somehow did manage to refile the case in Ecuador, and a few years later the populist Correa was elected (and Texaco could no longer expect special treatment from the executive branch). Ever since then (and especially since Chevron purchased Texaco in 2001), they have done everything possible to delay and frustrate the proceedings there, which is why it has taken over 18 years to get a final verdict. And they have literally hundreds of lawyers working on the case and have spent millions upon millions to vilify everyone associated with it (and Ecuador and its court system). But their allegations of fraud always fall apart upon the slightest scrutiny, and all of their threats and vitriol couldn't scare up an acquittal. The evidence is just indisputably against them, so all that they can do is try to muddy the waters enough to distract people from that fact.

Hope that this reply is helpful to you; please feel free to email again if you have other questions and I'll try to point you to answers.

P.S.
Oh - you know, there's one thing that I forgot to mention about the Chevron lawyer's (incredibly ignorant) email: He doesn't seem to have a clue that calling a Latin American country a "banana republic" is the same as saying that it is completely beholden to foreign companies that do whatever they please there. But then again, he also seems to think that Ecuador is in Central America, so I imagine he wasn't a history or geography major.
-----------------------------------------

 This pretty much confirms what I have heard from some others. Chevron is doing their best to get out of the responsibility for the mess they made while making billions of dollars on the oil they took from this region.


Markì
« Last Edit: May 01, 2012, 01:19:39 am by Toruk Makto »

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Re: Chevron being called out for their mess in Ecuador
« Reply #12 on: November 07, 2012, 03:21:15 pm »
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-11-07/argentine-judge-orders-seizing-100-of-chevron-argentine-assets.html

Argentine Judge Orders Chevron Asset Seizure, Plaintiffs

An Argentine judge ordered the seizure of all Chevron Corp. (CVX)’s assets in the country, according to Enrique Bruchou, a lawyer representing Ecuadorean plaintiffs in a lawsuit over pollution in the Amazon rainforest.

Bruchou, an Argentine attorney at Bruchou, Fernandez, Madero & Lombardi, made the comments today in a conference call. Civil Judge Elcuj Miranda ordered 40 percent of Chevron’s Argentine bank accounts to be held in escrow, Bruchou said. Miranda declined to comment when contacted by Bloomberg.

The Ecuadorean plaintiffs said Oct. 31 they were asking an Argentine court to enforce a $19 billion award against Chevron, filing an attachment order in a Commercial Court of Justice in Buenos Aires. The Ecuadoreans blame Texaco Inc., which Chevron acquired in 2001, for destroying the environment in the Lago Agrio region, damaging living conditions of 30,000 inhabitants.

Chevron is unaware of either a filing by the plaintiffs or a court order in Argentina, James Craig, a spokesman for the San Ramon, California-based company said in an e-mailed response to questions.

“The plaintiffs’ lawyers have no legal right to embargo subsidiary assets in Argentina and should not be allowed to disrupt Argentina’s pursuit of its important energy resources,” he said. “The Ecuador judgment is a product of bribery, fraud, and it is illegitimate.”

Shale Investments
Chevron, the fourth-largest producer of oil in Argentina, signed a memorandum of understanding on Sept. 14 with YPF SA (YPF), Argentina’s biggest energy company, to analyze a partnership to jointly develop projects at the shale formation of Vaca Muerta.

Chevron will face more attachment requests in Asia, Bruchou said today. Another related lawsuit was filed by the Ecuadoreans in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice in Toronto on May 30. The company on Oct. 9 lost a U.S. Supreme Court bid to block the judgment imposed by an Ecuadorean court. The highest U.S. court let stand a federal appeals court ruling against Chevron that the Ecuadoreans can’t be barred from seeking to collect the award anywhere in the world.



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Re: Chevron being called out for their mess in Ecuador
« Reply #13 on: October 14, 2013, 03:32:12 pm »
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 14, 2013
 
Contact:
Paul Paz y Miño, 510-773-4635, paz@amazonwatch.org
Caroline Bennett, 510-520-9390, caroline@amazonwatch.org
Han Shan, 914-418-4133, han@riseup.net


Chevron Retaliation Trial Opens Against Victims
of Pollution in Ecuador


Protestors rally for justice in Ecuador; Decry Chevron’s abuses

Protest in Foley Square, New York City: 9 am Tues., Oct. 15th – More info here

New York, NY – Tomorrow (Tuesday) Ecuadorian villagers from the Amazon rainforest region ravaged by Chevron's oil contamination will join supporters for a large rally in Foley Square across from the courthouse where a trial will open in the California-based oil giant's retaliatory RICO lawsuit against the Ecuadorians and their U.S. based legal advocates.

The Ecuadorians are representing 30,000 plaintiffs who won a landmark judgment against Chevron in an Ecuadorian court in 2011 in which the company was ordered to pay more than $18 billion for cleanup of widespread contamination, as well as compensatory and punitive damages. The case holding Chevron accountable for toxic dumping by its predecessor company, Texaco, has been upheld by appellate courts in Ecuador.

After nearly 20 years since the case was filed in 1993, Chevron refuses to pay for a cleanup and is waging a scorched earth legal, PR, and lobbying campaign to crush its victims and their advocates and supporters. The oil giant stripped its assets from the country, forcing the Ecuadorians to pursue enforcement of the judgment in countries where the company maintains assets.

"This trial is merely Chevron's latest cynical ploy to evade accountability for its crimes in Ecuador," said Paul Paz y Miño of Amazon Watch. "Chevron's legacy in the Amazon has caused enough environmental ruin and human suffering already; it's time the company to pay for a cleanup, rather than for more abusive efforts to run from its responsibility."

Villagers from the Ecuadorian Amazon living amidst hundreds of Chevron's abandoned toxic waste pits that litter the region will gather along with supporters to speak out at the protest in Foley Square. The rally is being organized by members of New York's large Ecuadorian community, along with human rights supporters and environmental activists who will be supporting them with a massive 'Lady Justice' figure and other visuals.

Forty-seven 'named plaintiffs' – all of them indigenous rainforest residents and rural villagers – who represent tens of thousands of affected people have been named in Chevron's lawsuit, which alleges that the entire case is a conspiracy to extort the company. Two of the Ecuadorian villagers have accepted personal jurisdiction in the case in order to fight the allegations. Fearing a public backlash for suing victims of its pollution, Chevron has focused its smear campaign on New York-based human rights attorney Steven Donziger, who has advised the Ecuadorians in their efforts since first visiting the contaminated region in 1993.

"I lost two children to Texaco's pollution and the company now calls me a criminal for daring to demand justice," said Emergildo Criollo, a leader of the Cofan indigenous tribe in whose ancestral lands the oil company first explored for oil in 1964. "Since the company arrived, our culture has been decimated, our children poisoned, our rainforest ruined, and Chevron dares to call us criminals?"

The Ecuadorians and their supporters have called for an end to Chevron's retaliatory lawsuit, and are calling this latest effort a "rigged show trial" before a federal judge, Lewis A. Kaplan, who has displayed outright hostility to the Ecuadorians' legal efforts to demand a cleanup. Judge Kaplan has also made repeated disparaging on the record comments about Ecuador's judicial system.

Texaco operated in Ecuador until 1992, and Chevron absorbed the company in 2001, assuming all of its predecessor's assets and liabilities.

Chevron has admitted to dumping nearly 16 billion gallons of toxic wastewater – the byproduct of oil drilling and pumping – into rivers and streams relied upon by thousands of people for drinking, bathing, and fishing. The company also abandoned hundreds of unlined, open waste pits filled with crude, sludge, and oil drilling chemicals throughout the inhabited rainforest region. In other countries at the same time as it was operating with no environmental controls in Ecuador, the company re-injected wastewater, and used easily-deployed technology to deal with toxic byproducts of its oil drilling.

Multiple independent health studies have shown an epidemic of oil-related birth defects, cancers, and other illness. It is estimated that the contamination has directly led to at least 1,400 deaths.


More Information:

    amazonwatch.org
    chevrontoxico.com
    [url=http://www.stevendonziger.com]www.stevendonziger.com


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Lì’fyari leNa’vi ’Rrtamì, vay set ’almong a fra’u zera’u ta ngrrpongu
Na'vi Dictionary: http://files.learnnavi.org/dicts/NaviDictionary.pdf

 

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