Author Topic: Txe'lanit Hivawl...  (Read 11827 times)

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Offline Prrton

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Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« on: June 18, 2010, 04:44:36 pm »
Octal Number Marking

Na’vi octal numbers should be marked with a small elevated circle to indicate the appropriate value based on «vol». The raised « º » is the same symbol used for “degrees” in many conventions on Earth. In Na’vi, think of it as the «o» in «v‹o›l» or the ‘o’ of “octal”. The mark precedes or follows the numeral depending on the flow of the phrase. Examples:

   « º30a trr » or « trr a30º » (“24 days”)
   « º12vea zekwä » or « zekwä a12ºve» (“the 10th finger”)
   « º13:36 srekamtrr » (“11:30 AM” (terran time))

Marking on 0~7 is optional when they are isolated.

   kew = zero / 0 (and the name of the number symbol)
   ’eyt = the name of the number symbol “8” (the value is irrelevant)
   nayn = the name of the number symbol “9” (the value is irrelevant)


Quote from: K. Pawl
Tewti! Mesìpawm asìltsan nìtxan nang!

Never thought of that . . .

Let's see . . .

The only ones on Pandora who would ever have need of 8 and 9 would be, as you say, those who went to Grace's school and need to converse with the Sawtute--or refer to things Sawtute among themselves. And these Na'vi would only ever have been exposed to English, not other earth languages. So it seems reasonable that they'd borrow the words from English, especially since they fit easily into Na'vi phonology (and fortunately for us they're not otherwise assigned in the lexicon).

So:

8 = 'eyt
9 = nayn

   (To be used only with things like phone numbers.)

Furia fìlì'fyavit fkol ta 'Ìnglìsì molunge, sìlpey oe tsnì ayhapxìtu lì’fyaolo'ä awngeyä ke stìyevi.

Trrit Nerong Txonìl   (Night Follows Day)



The Pandoran day beings at or just before daybreak and follows an average cyclical pattern (to the best of our knowledge) which is punctuated by 4 regular pattern markers relating to natural light and the longer periods that fall between these milestones. The pattern markers are «trr’ong» (“daybreak/dawn”), «kxamtrr» (“mid-day/noon” - when the light is constant), «txon’ong» (“darkness falls/night unfolds”), and «kxamtxon» (“midnight”). As seasons or other celestial mechanics effect Pandora, the points at which these events occur may also change. They are relative, not absolute. Parallels to eclipses or sudden changes in ambient light in the night might also occur. These things are unknown to us at this time. This “typical” pattern and the full cycle of one morning through the day and night to the next morning is called «trrtxon». Please see the graphics to get a sense of duration and progression.




There are three completely new terms that refer to segments of the day. They are RE.won, ha’NGIR, and KAYM. All are the creation of Karyu Pawl and their relationship to the day should be clear from the images. Because the Na’vi sleep during the night, they do not have such precise divisions for the darkness of night. There are two generic periods of txon before and after the midnight marker.

Krr ka Trrtxon lEywa’eveng

  sresrr'ong
   trr’ong
   trr'ongmaw
   rewon
   srekamtrr
   kxamtrr
   kxamtrrmaw
   ha’ngir
   kaym
   sreton’ong
   txon’ong
   txon’ongmaw
   txon
   srekamtxon
   kxamtxon
   kxamtxomaw
(this spelling is correct)
   txon

The «sre-» and «-maw» periods can be thought of as belonging to the specifically named periods with which they have contact. Therefore «srekamtrr» can be thought of conceptually as the final stage of «rewon». «Kxamtrrmaw» can be considered the beginning stage of «ha’ngir» and «sreton’ong» could be considered the end of «kaym» (“evening”), but kaym does not extend conceptually past «txon’ong» for the Na’vi. Once it is dark, «kaym» is over and «txon» has begun.


Quote from: K. Pawl
The usual derivatives:

   rewonam 'yesterday morning' [stress shifts to final syllable]
   rewonay 'tomorrow morning' [stress shifts to final syllable]
   rewon 'this morning' (should be listed in the lexicon along with fìtrr and fìtxon)

   And the corresponding forms for kaym and ha’ngir.

Krr ka Trrtxon le’Rrta

The Na’vi do not keep time using devices, but the following “rough time maps” can provide an idea of when the Na’vi concepts of times of day might map to life on earth. Please note that 12:00 noon («º14:00 kxamtrr») and midnight (º14:00 or 0:00º kxamtxon) are locked to the earth clock in this model as a standard earth convention, but the time of trr’ong and txon’ong would change on earth based on one’s location on the planet, season, etc., so they do not appear as lexical items in this list. They cannot be consistently tied to times in a day divided into 24 sections because of their brevity.

The Na’vi also don’t have a fixed “noon” or “midnight” or a conceptual “meridian” (the ‘m’ of “AM” & “PM” on earth). Their words for “pre-noon” («srekamtrr») and “post-noon” («kxamtrrmaw») do NOT mean AM and PM as on earth. These are periods of time (one of our terran hours or less) when they feel that kxamtrr is about to happen (and rewon will end), or has just occurred (and ha’ngir is beginning). We would need to live on Pandora to get a sense of how they intuit these things. Unfortunately, we just have our imaginations...

11:00 AM on the earth clock would roughly map to º13:00 srekamtrr on earth, but 8:00 AM is not close enough to “mid-day” to qalify as srekamtrr. That would likely be the “morning” most places on Earth so º10:00 rewon.

There are no words for discrete time divisions yet; no “hour”, “minute”, “second” equivalents.

If you need to say 2:30 in the afternoon verbally (meaning the terran afternoon), say «mune:pxevofu ha’ngir» = º2:36. Just pause for the colon. K. Pawl supports these abbreviations in writing:

   º12:17 R
   KxT
   º2:36 H
   º4:55 K
   º10:36 Tx (T) <--- correction
   KxTx


Two different flavors of ’Rrtan time-keeping depending on the conventions of your region. Note that at different times of the year and different places on the planet the period of the day falls differently. These are just offered as examples. In the winter in Canada, kaym is likely well over by 5:00 PM. In Spain in summer kaym may not end until 10:00 PM. We’ll just have to learn how to adjust. It will teach us to think carefully about the geography of our own world.





If you find all of this “interesting” you now have a way to SAY it...

  eltur tìtxen si = to be interesting / intriguing

      (A) Tsa’u eltur tìtxen si. (“That’s interesting.”)
      (B) Tsavur oeyä eltur tìtxen soli.  (“That story intrigued me.”) OR:
      (C) Tsavur feyä ayeltur tìtxen soli.  (“They found that story interesting.”) OR:
      (D) Pxoeri tsavur eltur tìtxen soli. (“The three of us were interested in that story.”)

If figuring out how many brains are involved for the genitive model is an issue, topicalize the subject(s) in -ìri/-ri and use just one brain as in the example (D).


The Na’vi (youth) have slang too...

  w•o•u = stative v. “to be amazing/fascinating” (slang)

      - If you’re a typical teenage boy:
         WOU Neytiri! (“Neytiri is the bomb/awesome!”)

      - If you’re a linguist:
         Oeru woeiu lì’fya leNa’vi. (“I’m just fascinated by the Na’vi language.”)

      -If you’re a botanist.:
         Mì na’rìng Tsyeykìl loreyuti ’olampi a tsaswaw WOU oer nìwotx!
         (“That instant when Jake touched the Helicoradiam Spirale in the forest I was totally amazed.”)

      - If you’re a dad just back from a long day at the zoo with your 7-y-o
        (who fell asleep in the car) reporting to mom:
         Por warmou frafneioang nìtut, slä nìpxi pxesyìräfì.
         (“He just couldn’t get over all the animals, but was especially taken with the 3 giraffe.” (nb: tsyìräfì, mesyìräfì, etc...)

The origin of «wou»:

When Jake was new to the Na’vi, he was also new to the Pandoran forest. He couldn’t speak Na'vi and was constantly walking around being continually amazed by Pandora. He said "Whoa!" a lot. While the Na'vi (especially the young people who where hanging on his every word and action) couldn’t know exactly what “Whoa!” was grammatically in English, it was very clear to them that he was “impressed/amazed”. They started using “whoa!” (pronounced in Na’vi as «wo.u» ) more or less as a stative verb. By the time Jake became Toruk Makto, the evolution of “whoa!” to «w•o•u» was etched in the stone of Na’vi youth culture. People much older than Neytiri and Jake may hear the younger folk using it, but they don’t know exactly what it means. Compare ’Rrtan grandparents understadning how a cellphone app can be “sick”. They basically don’t. At all. Enjoy.


Analysis of a rather complex sentence:

  Tsawa ngal kawkrr sngelit ke munge wrrpane ulte nìtut zene
   ätxäle sirvängi ngar oe, steyki fìtxan fte keng ke tsivun tsawteri
   fpivìl luke fwa sngä'i tsngivawvìk.


   “Your never taking out the trash and my having to constantly ask
     you to do it makes me so angry that I can’t even think about it
     without starting to cry.”

«Fwa» with adpositions

Na’vi gerunds (e.g. «tìyusom, tìnusäk» “eating, drinking”) do not take direct objects. So to say “without beginning to cry” the reguar verb phrase «sgnä’i tsngivawvìk» takes «fwa» (or «a fì’u») and the regular adposition «luke» is added to the correct side of «fwa» or «a fì’u».

Not all adpositions make sense with «fwa». Be careful.

«Sngä’i» as a modal verb

In this particuar case, «sgnä’i» is used modally. That requires that «tsngawvìk» carry the invix «•iv•» to become «tsngivawvìk».

The contrast between «fwa/tsawa», «furia/tsaria», etc…

There is a full set of «tsa-»-based conjucntions that corresponds to the «fì-»-based patterns.


    fwa  futa  furia
    tsawa  tsata  tsaria
   
The most common and “default” formation is via a form in «fì-», however, when the topic being discussed is something that has been previously established between the speaker and listener, «tsa-» can indicate this distinction. In this example, all references to the trash being/not being taken out are in something «tsa-» (because they have been discussed/rehashed between these two (speaker and listener) over and over again. However, the speaker getting upset enough to cry about it is new, so “without starting to cry” is in «fwa» and not «tsawa». You are not required to make this distinction. This is a subtlety of the language available to those to whom this kind of granularity is important. The choice of «tsawa» over «fwa» is subjective and at the speaker’s discretion.

«Lam oer, _____» vs. «Lam oer fwa _____»

K. Paul used «lam oer, _____________» to me in a note. I had never seen this without «fwa», so I asked him...

Is there anything wrong with «lam oer» taking «fwa» to link it to “whatever seems...”?


Quote from: K. Pawl
No, that’s fine.

   Lam oer fwa po lu kanu nìtxan. OR Lam oer, po lu kanu nìtxan.

   My thinking here is that over time, lam oer could have evolved into a kind of adverbial, almost like “seemingly,” just as sìlpey oe can have the force of “hopefully.”

Alo & Fralo

  alo = time / turn / instance (c.f. Spanish «vez» compared to «tiempo» or French « fois » compared to « temps ».)

Quote from: K. Pawl
It's like this definition of time given in my desk dictionary:

   "one of a number of repeated or recurring actions or instances. 'Cowards die many times before their deaths.' (Shakespeare, Julius Caesar).

   Examples:

      (1) Alo amrr poan polawm, slä fralo* poe poltxe san kehe.**

           "He asked five times, but each time she said, 'no.'"

                   *fralo 'each time, every time' [FRA.lo, obviously from fra+alo]
                   **If the quoted speech ends the utterance, the final sìk is optional.

       (2) Ayupxareri angim nìhawng lu alo oeyä!

            "Now it's my turn for a message that's too long!"

This is the same «lo» of ’awlo and melo (once, twice), but notice the stress shifts to «lo» in «aLO».

Numbers take nouns in the SINGULAR.

Quote from: K. Pawl
  NOTE: I'm not sure I ever made this clear anywhere:

   When you quantify a noun with a number, you use the SINGULAR form, not the plural.

   So '8 nantangs' is nantang avol or vola nantang, NOT *aynantang avol.

Using «mllte» in agreement with others about specific topics

I agree with you. Oe ngahu mllte. ??

Quote from: K. Pawl
Yes, that’s fine. Ngahu mllte oe.
And how is the subject of the agreement marked?

   “I agree with father that it is too far to the ocean to try to make the journey tomorrow in just one day.”

   Oe hu sempul mllte tsara txampay lìm nìhawng fte trray fmivi sivop tengkrr a trr a’aw ftem.


       OR?

   Txampay lìm nìhawng fte tengkrr a ftem trr a’aw fmivi trray sivop a tsari mllte oe hu sempul.


Quote from: K. Pawl
  The thing/subject agreed on should be topicalized. "As for X, I agree with you." So use Furia/Tsaria.

Variations on the theme of ‘patience’

I thanked him about being patient with all of my questions. He responded with the sentence:

Quote from: K. Pawl
Lu nga sì lahea ayhapxìtu lì'fyaolo'ä awngeyä ayawpo a maweyperey.
The «ayawpo» (“individuals”) and clause structure threw me off a bit, so I asked him...

   Is my translation of this sentence correct ? :

    Lu nga sì lahea ayhapxìtu lì'fyaolo'ä awngeyä ayawpo a maweyperey.
    The individuals who are being patient are you and other members of our Sprachbund. ??


Quote from:  K. Pawl

Your translation is fine. What I was trying to capture was something like what we do in English when we say, "You think I'M being patient? No, no, it's YOU who are being patient!" So that would be:

  
You and the other members of our Sprachbund are the ones who are being patient.

Same thing, obviously--just a slightly different emphasis.

I was searching for a structure that would mirror the difference between A and B:

   (A) John left.
   (B) John is the one who left.

(If I recall my English transformational syntax, B is an example of "left dislocation." "Right dislocation" would be: The one who left is John.)

Malay/Indonesian has a structure that keeps coming to mind:

   (C) John sudah bertolak.   vs.
                 PAST   leave

   (D) John-lah yang sudah bertolak.
             EMPH REL  PAST   leave

So there was a lot of back and forth about how this is done in Japanese and other languages and the results are three different (correct/blessed) variations of the same thing.

Quote from: K. Pawl
I like your sentences with tsayawpo! Very nice, and excellent variants of my sentence.
  Nga sì lahea ayhapxìtu lì'fyaolo'ä awngeyä lu tsayawpo a maweyperey.

   Maweyperey a tsayawpo lu nga sì lahea ayhapxìtu lì'fyaolo'ä awngeyä.
   The one’s who’re being patient are you and the other Sprachbund members.

   Aymaweypeyyu längu nga sì lahea ayhapxìtu lì'fyaolo'ä awngeyä.

So we have a word «maweypeyyu» which means “one who is patient”.

Also,


Quote from: K. Pawl

Hivahaw nìmwey.

ta P.

(nìmwey ADV. 'calmly, peacefully' [nìm.WEY])
So, even though he doesn’t know Japanese, he’s created something along the lines of o-yasumi nasai, (“please rest well”) for “goodnight” (when it’s bedtime).

Finally four new (important) adjectives:

  ku’up = ‘heavy’ (physical weight)
   syo = ‘light’, ‘lighweight’
   hay = ‘next’
   ham  =‘last’, ‘previous’


Quote from: K. Pawl

   Alo ahay oe zasya'u mì rewon.
   'Next time I'll come in the morning.'

As you've probably already realized, these words explain the evolution of the -am and -ay suffixes; e.g., trr + aham > trram



Have a good weekend, folks.

This might keep some of you busy!
  ;D
« Last Edit: June 23, 2010, 11:17:27 am by Prrton »

Offline Lance R. Casey

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2010, 05:10:33 pm »
This might keep some of you busy!   ;D

Nìngay nang! :o

Only skimmed it so far, but this stood out:

Alo & Fralo

   alo = time / turn / instance (c.f. Spanish «vez» compared to «tiempo» or French « fois » compared to « temps ».)

Quote from: K. Pawl
It's like this definition of time given in my desk dictionary:

   "one of a number of repeated or recurring actions or instances. 'Cowards die many times before their deaths.' (Shakespeare, Julius Caesar).

   Examples:

      (1) Alo amrr poan polawm, slä fralo* poe poltxe san kehe.**

           "He asked five times, but each time she said, 'no.'"

                   *fralo 'each time, every time' [FRA.lo, obviously from fra+alo]
                   **If the quoted speech ends the utterance, the final sìk is optional.

       (2) Ayupxareri angim nìhawng lu alo oeyä!

            "Now it's my turn for a message that's too long!"

This is the same «lo» of ’awlo and melo (once, twice), but notice the stress shifts to «lo» in «aLO».

Are we to assume, then, that anything above "twice" is rendered with two words, instead of a suffix? I would at least have expected *pxelo...

// Lance R. Casey

Offline Muzer

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2010, 05:32:50 pm »
Next and previous! So useful for Opera! Irayo, Pawl sì prrton! Why couldn't they have come up before? Lol.
[21:42:56] <@Muzer> Apple products used to be good, if expensive
[21:42:59] <@Muzer> now they are just expensive

Offline kewnya txamew'itan

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2010, 05:33:45 pm »
faylì'u wou oeru (I hope that's right) and you speak truly when you say that this'll keep us busy.  :D
Internet Acronyms Nìna'vi

hamletä tìralpuseng lena'vi sngolä'eiyi. tìkangkem si awngahu ro
http://bit.ly/53GnAB
The translation of Hamlet into Na'vi has started! Join with us at http://bit.ly/53GnAB

txo nga new oehu pivlltxe nìna'vi, nga oer 'eylan si mì fayspuk (http://bit.ly/bp9fwf)
If you want to speak na'vi to me, friend me on facebook (http://bit.ly/bp9fwf)

numena'viyä hapxì amezamkivohinve
learnnavi's

Offline Nyx

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2010, 05:38:26 pm »
Busy indeed... I was supposed to be asleep by now :P

Offline okrìsti

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2010, 05:43:14 pm »
I quickly need a word for JAW. ;)
dA | nga tsun oehu pivlltxe fa skype: c4duser
awngeyä wìki sìltsan lu
txopu lu fya’o ne vawma pa’o – nawma karyu Yotxa

Offline Kyle Kepone

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2010, 06:00:16 pm »
When did this stuff get in??? **Bomb**
Oe lu 'eylan lì'fyayä leNa'vi

My Blog, including Na'vi lessons: http://dissentculture.wordpress.com

Offline Meuia te Stxeli Tstew'itan

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2010, 06:01:54 pm »
Na’vi octal numbers should be marked with a small elevated circle to indicate the appropriate value based on «vol». The raised « º » is the same symbol used for “degrees” in many conventions on Earth.

Why don't we actually use the official international standard for octal numbers which is prefixing them with a 0?
Fìtsenge kifkey nìswey livu txo ayoe nìNa'vi perlltxeie. Ngal 'awstengyem olo'it fpi tskxekeng.

Offline Muzer

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2010, 06:05:37 pm »
Na’vi octal numbers should be marked with a small elevated circle to indicate the appropriate value based on «vol». The raised « º » is the same symbol used for “degrees” in many conventions on Earth.

Why don't we actually use the official international standard for octal numbers which is prefixing them with a 0?

Or Google's "hey I've got a great idea, because 0x exists for hex let's make 0o for octal and 0b for binary" way of doing it :P
[21:42:56] <@Muzer> Apple products used to be good, if expensive
[21:42:59] <@Muzer> now they are just expensive

Offline Meuia te Stxeli Tstew'itan

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #9 on: June 18, 2010, 06:06:58 pm »
Na’vi octal numbers should be marked with a small elevated circle to indicate the appropriate value based on «vol». The raised « º » is the same symbol used for “degrees” in many conventions on Earth.

Why don't we actually use the official international standard for octal numbers which is prefixing them with a 0?

Or Google's "hey I've got a great idea, because 0x exists for hex let's make 0o for octal and 0b for binary" way of doing it :P

Not 0o. Just 0. It actually is a standard used in every programming language on earth and most mathematic notations.
Fìtsenge kifkey nìswey livu txo ayoe nìNa'vi perlltxeie. Ngal 'awstengyem olo'it fpi tskxekeng.

Offline Plumps

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #10 on: June 18, 2010, 06:10:13 pm »
This is a mouthful and needs some digesting ::)

Thanks so much for sharing, ma Prrton, and ending this time of waiting! :)

Offline Prrton

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #11 on: June 18, 2010, 06:11:23 pm »
This might keep some of you busy!   ;D

Nìngay nang! :o

Only skimmed it so far, but this stood out:

Alo & Fralo

   alo = time / turn / instance (c.f. Spanish «vez» compared to «tiempo» or French « fois » compared to « temps ».)

Quote from: K. Pawl
It's like this definition of time given in my desk dictionary:

   "one of a number of repeated or recurring actions or instances. 'Cowards die many times before their deaths.' (Shakespeare, Julius Caesar).

   Examples:

      (1) Alo amrr poan polawm, slä fralo* poe poltxe san kehe.**

           "He asked five times, but each time she said, 'no.'"

                   *fralo 'each time, every time' [FRA.lo, obviously from fra+alo]
                   **If the quoted speech ends the utterance, the final sìk is optional.

       (2) Ayupxareri angim nìhawng lu alo oeyä!

            "Now it's my turn for a message that's too long!"

This is the same «lo» of ’awlo and melo (once, twice), but notice the stress shifts to «lo» in «aLO».

Are we to assume, then, that anything above "twice" is rendered with two words, instead of a suffix? I would at least have expected *pxelo...
'awlo & melo are the only two in that pattern of "number of times" that are attested, but this should NOT preclude pxelo (and possibly others). We'll have to ask how high up they go...

Offline Muzer

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #12 on: June 18, 2010, 06:12:33 pm »
Na’vi octal numbers should be marked with a small elevated circle to indicate the appropriate value based on «vol». The raised « º » is the same symbol used for “degrees” in many conventions on Earth.

Why don't we actually use the official international standard for octal numbers which is prefixing them with a 0?

Or Google's "hey I've got a great idea, because 0x exists for hex let's make 0o for octal and 0b for binary" way of doing it :P

Not 0o. Just 0. It actually is a standard used in every programming language on earth and most mathematic notations.

No, but that's what I'm saying - Google defied all tradition and made it 0o for no apparent reason other than it looking more like 0x...


EG:

http://www.google.com/search?client=opera&rls=ni&q=010+in+decimal&sourceid=opera&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

http://www.google.com/search?client=opera&rls=ni&q=0o10+in+decimal&sourceid=opera&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8
[21:42:56] <@Muzer> Apple products used to be good, if expensive
[21:42:59] <@Muzer> now they are just expensive

Offline Nìwotxkrr Tìyawn

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #13 on: June 18, 2010, 06:17:12 pm »
My brain just gushed out of my ears... so much information to process at once. I came here thinking "oh cool a new tidbit of info from frommer" but then, EXSPLOOOSEFHSHEDSF!
Naruto Shippuden Episode 166: Confession
                                    Watch it, Love it, Live it

Offline Meuia te Stxeli Tstew'itan

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #14 on: June 18, 2010, 06:24:23 pm »
Na’vi octal numbers should be marked with a small elevated circle to indicate the appropriate value based on «vol». The raised « º » is the same symbol used for “degrees” in many conventions on Earth.

Why don't we actually use the official international standard for octal numbers which is prefixing them with a 0?

Or Google's "hey I've got a great idea, because 0x exists for hex let's make 0o for octal and 0b for binary" way of doing it :P

Not 0o. Just 0. It actually is a standard used in every programming language on earth and most mathematic notations.

No, but that's what I'm saying - Google defied all tradition and made it 0o for no apparent reason other than it looking more like 0x...


EG:

http://www.google.com/search?client=opera&rls=ni&q=010+in+decimal&sourceid=opera&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

http://www.google.com/search?client=opera&rls=ni&q=0o10+in+decimal&sourceid=opera&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

Oh well... I guess anyway, we're stuck with a new way of writing it which will make teaching Na'vi even more complex as not all fonts have the ° symbol and not everyone knows how to make it...

On an other note: Tsa'u WOU! There's a lot of stuff to read now ;)
Fìtsenge kifkey nìswey livu txo ayoe nìNa'vi perlltxeie. Ngal 'awstengyem olo'it fpi tskxekeng.

Offline Rain

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #15 on: June 18, 2010, 06:39:34 pm »
Wou.... :o
"If there are self-made purgatories, then we shall all have to live in them."
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Offline Muzer

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #16 on: June 18, 2010, 06:39:42 pm »
Odd question, how does Paul Frommer usually start/end his e-mails nìNa'vi (if he does it in Na'vi, I'm assuming he does at least sometimes)? I've never seen one in its entirety, and there's an introduction e-mail I need to translate.
[21:42:56] <@Muzer> Apple products used to be good, if expensive
[21:42:59] <@Muzer> now they are just expensive

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2010, 06:52:35 pm »
Tewti! Txantsan! Ke lu oer aylì'u, fìfmawn wou oeru ;) Irayo seiyi oe ngaru, ma Prrton, sì karyur awngeyä ::)

Ngian lu oer tìpawm:

«Lam oer, _____» vs. «Lam oer fwa _____»

K. Paul used «lam oer, _____________» to me in a note. I had never seen this without «fwa», so I asked him...

Is there anything wrong with «lam oer» taking «fwa» to link it to “whatever seems...”?


Quote from: K. Pawl
No, that’s fine.

   Lam oer fwa po lu kanu nìtxan. OR Lam oer, po lu kanu nìtxan.

   My thinking here is that over time, lam oer could have evolved into a kind of adverbial, almost like “seemingly,” just as sìlpey oe can have the force of “hopefully.”

Srake tsun fko pivlltxe tengfya:

fpìl oe, po lu kanu nìtxan (tup san fpìl oel futa po lu kanu nìtxan sìk)
tsunslu, po lu kanu nìtxan (tup san tsunslu fwa po lu kanu nìtxan sìk)?
Nìrangal frapo tsirvun pivlltxe nìNa'vi :D

Tsamsiyu92

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #18 on: June 18, 2010, 07:00:27 pm »
Wou, nang!   :)

so...mny...words....at....once.....*mind explodes*
« Last Edit: June 18, 2010, 07:03:09 pm by Tsamsiyu92 »

Offline Ftiafpi

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Re: Txe'lanit Hivawl...
« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2010, 07:01:25 pm »
Tewti!

 

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