Author Topic: Advice for Na’vi Learners  (Read 1705 times)

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Offline Tirea Aean

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Re: Advice for Na’vi Learners
« Reply #20 on: July 21, 2015, 05:14:20 pm »
* I probably cannot stress enough this one: Just get out there and give it a shot! The worst that could happen is that your sentence or translation is not totally correct and it will get corrected, resulting in a step towards learning.
* Many people use flashcards, some do not. I never did. Everyone is different.

I've read a lot of polyglot blogs, and there are different schools of thought when it comes to learning languages, and polyglots disagree with each other about what is best. Some polyglots, like Benny, insist on speaking and writing even if mistakes are made. Others, like Khatzumoto, insist on having immense amounts of input (reading/listening) before attempting any output (speaking/writing).

I'm convinced that it comes down to personality. Tirea Aean, for example, seems to have really enjoyed learning by speaking, mistakes notwithstanding. I, on the other hand, found it agonizing to speak in the beginning before I knew anything, and deal with the anxiety of not knowing whether anything I said was correct (and the "bombardments" of corrections that would inevitably follow). For me, massive input before output was the way to go, which I've done with flashcards. Now I can say lots of things with confidence that it'll be correct, and can mostly avoid the unpleasantness of corrections.

This isn't a matter of which is right or wrong. Tirea is clearly very skilled, so his method worked for him. Learners need to try things and decide for themselves what best suits them. :-\

Honestly, for me it was a combination of both:

massive amounts of input combined with just getting out there and using it. Any replies to my messages or whatever would count toward the massive input.

It also kind of "helped" that I was (am) obsessed with the language to the point where it's not normal or healthy. (do not recommend)

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Offline Plumps

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Re: Advice for Na’vi Learners
« Reply #21 on: July 22, 2015, 11:09:40 am »
Learners need to try things and decide for themselves what best suits them. :-\

Exactly how I think. And we need to realise and accept that it’s not bad if somebody else has other methods of acquiring the language. It will only get difficult if numeyu and karyu of opposite factions come together :P But there are ways around it.

Offline Tstewa Ikrantsyìp

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Re: Advice for Na’vi Learners
« Reply #22 on: July 22, 2015, 06:07:29 pm »
Exactly.
I'm working on a chart that talks about this.
it has the different kinds of learners, the different methods of learning, and the materials that can be useful, for whichever student and method of learning. :)
Mega - Na'vi - Booklet - Project (One Book to Rule Them All)
Unofficial Na'vi survey
Na'vi - Sign - Language - Project

Na'vi - Language - Book - Project

Offline Tstewa Ikrantsyìp

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Re: Advice for Na’vi Learners
« Reply #23 on: July 22, 2015, 09:41:58 pm »
One big piece of advice is this
Quote
It also kind of "helped" that I was (am) obsessed with the language to the point where it's not normal or healthy. (do not recommend)
MEDIATION

while it is better if you are so thoroughly obsessed with the language and community and forum and culture as much as Tirea Aean, Tìtstewan, Ftiafpi and a series of other more mature, elder Na'vi persons, one must learn mediation.
I have experienced myself, where I started getting so obsessed with the community in the beginning when I first joined. I would think:
"Look at all these people, they're doing so much, I will never be as good as them, I'm so stupid, why can't I learn, maybe I can do this to make up for it, or this, or this, maybe if I just keep on studying I can learn faster, I want to be part of this community, I want to be worthy, I'm probably not even good enough to see this community let alone be part of this wondrous family, i'll probably be a burden"

What I did was I would stay up for days on end, I'd study, and organise, and then I'd begin projects for the community, and I'd try memorise words and sentences, and read all the grammar books, and I'd research different parts of the culture, I was so obsessed with being part of the community and not making a nuisance of myself. my grades went down, my social life (already extremely depleted) completed disappeared. my social interactions ceased. I stopped communicating with friends and family, I'd lose sleep. I got sick. I got angry and emotional. I wouldn't eat.

this community is an amazing place. but you must know your limitations and be careful not to be swept away by it, despite it's amazing-ness :P
mediation and control. that's all. it's very important.
Mega - Na'vi - Booklet - Project (One Book to Rule Them All)
Unofficial Na'vi survey
Na'vi - Sign - Language - Project

Na'vi - Language - Book - Project

Offline Kame Ayyo’koti

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Re: Advice for Na’vi Learners
« Reply #24 on: August 24, 2015, 09:40:11 pm »
Read blogs by polyglots, especially if you've never learned another language before. Learning a language for the first time is an adventure into the unknown, and learning from those who have already made the journey helps.

Some of the ways they've helped me are:

  • They're motivating. Their enthusiasm rubs off on me, and they make what feels impossible seem possible.
  • They give a realistic view of the learning process. This has helped me discard incorrect assumptions I've had about learning a language. (Like "Only childhood learners can become fluent.")
  • They give me study/activity ideas.
  • They discuss problems and solutions to them.

Here are some of my favorite polyglot bloggers:

Every polyglot has their own methods and perspectives on learning language and what's best. Shop around and find someone you can relate to. ;)
"Your work is to discover your world, and then with all your heart give yourself to it."

 

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