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Offline Tìtstewan

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Re: Easy Na'vi Lessons Blog
« Reply #120 on: February 05, 2017, 10:40:03 am »
https://github.com/Titstewan/Tirea-Material-Lesson-Blog

Here you go. :) I have created an own repository because there occured a few things I would like to find a solution for. (check the issue tab)

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Re: Easy Na'vi Lessons Blog
« Reply #121 on: February 05, 2017, 11:50:35 am »
Interesting.

If you don't see it by the time you see this post, I think I see what you did there.

I'll have to look deeper at the Issues in 6 hours from now.

As far as I can tell from a quick skim, you've restructured the files and urls to be less files, in the style of your Dothraki project.

kelku ikranä a hawnventi yom podcast (na'vi-only): https://tirearadio.com/podcast
Learn Na'vi Discord Chat: https://discord.gg/WF6qcmv

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Re: Easy Na'vi Lessons Blog
« Reply #122 on: February 05, 2017, 12:17:34 pm »
Sound issue fixed and another small bug fixed. Oe längu skxawng.

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Re: Easy Na'vi Lessons Blog
« Reply #123 on: March 24, 2017, 11:25:00 am »
Kaltxì!

After a long long time I make an update post to this thread.

As many of you may know, this website (tirea.learnnavi.org) has been undergoing many many edits in the back end and the UI.

I am proud to announce that with the help of Tìtstewan, Vawmataw, and others, the website is going International!

If any of you would like to translate the interface and lessons to your language, feel free to reply if interested.

Here are the files and content to be translated:


language/english.php:
Code: (php) [Select]
<?php
/*----------------------------
This is a new custom home page for Tirea Tean's Lesson Blog.

The main Text Strings for translation.

Author: Tìtstewan
titstewan-learnnavi.org
Co-Author: Tirea Aean
tirea-learnnavi.org

Tirea Na'vi Lesson Blog - Easy Lesson Blog
Copyright (C) 2017  Tìtstewan & Tirea Aean
GNU GPLv3
https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-3.0.en.html
----------------------------*/
// $txt[''] = '';
// general stuff
$txt['about'] = 'About';
$txt['no_audio'] = 'Your browser does not support the audio element.';
$txt['tlb_exp'] = 'EXPERIMENTAL SITE UNDER CONSTRUCTION! :D';
$txt['foot_admin'] = 'Website Admin/Designer';
$txt['foot_softdev'] = 'Software development';
$txt['foot_disc'] = 'This site was created by members of the <a href="http://learnnavi.org/">LearnNa\'vi.org</a> forum. <br />
This site is not affiliated with the official Avatar website, James Cameron, Lightstorm Entertainment or the
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. All Trademarks and Servicemarks are the properties of their
respective owners.'
;
// Tuto: h_ = home, m_ = menu, s_ = sound page, g_ = the name generator, l_ = links, d_ = downloads, n_ = Na'vi lessons, a_ = about
// menu
$txt['m_language'] = 'Language';
$txt['m_home'] = 'Home';
$txt['m_sounds'] = 'Sounds';
$txt['m_lessons'] = 'Lessons';
$txt['m_links'] = 'Links';
$txt['m_downloads'] = 'Downloads';
$txt['m_rss'] = 'RSS Feed';
// home
$txt['h_welcome'] = 'Welcome';
$txt['h_title'] = 'Easy Grammar Lessons';
$txt['h_welcome_txt'] = 'Welcome to Tirea Na\'vi! This site exists to teach the Na\'vi
                  Language to everyone in an easy to understand way. For all you
                  non-linguist Avatar fans out there, I hope to help you on your
                  way to becoming the next speaker of this amazing language.
                  -- Tirea Aean'
;
$txt['h_get_st'] = 'Get started';
// sounds
$txt['s_sound'] = 'Na&#39;vi Sounds';
$txt['s_intro'] = '<span class="navi">Kaltxì</span> ma frapo! This page contains the letters,
    the corresponding International Phonetics Alphabet (IPA) characters and recordings
    of the sounds of the Na&#39;vi language. So to practice your pronunciation,
    click the play button and listen, then try to go along and such.'
;
$txt['s_vowels'] = 'Vowels';
$txt['s_pseudo'] = 'Pseudovowels';
$txt['s_conson'] = 'Consonants';
$txt['s_diphto'] = 'Diphthongs';
// links
$txt['l_links'] = 'Links';
$txt['l_cool'] = 'Things I think are cool';
$txt['l_blogs'] = 'Na\'vi Blogs I read';
$txt['l_navi_gen'] = 'Na\'vi Name Generator';
$txt['l_valid_gen'] = 'Generates valid names';
// downloads
$txt['d_downl'] = 'Downloads';
$txt['d_thing'] = 'Other Things Hosted On This Site';
$txt['d_hrhgif'] = 'Bunch of old memes and comics and whatnot, some Na&#39;vi-related';
$txt['d_images'] = 'images folder';
// lessons
$txt['n_lesson'] = 'Na\'vi Language Lessons';
$txt['n_basic'] = 'Conversational Lessons';
$txt['n_01c'] = 'Greetings &amp; Introductions';
$txt['n_02c'] = 'Test Lesson 2 C';
$txt['n_intro'] = 'Simplified Grammar Lessons';
$txt['n_01g'] = 'Word Order &amp; Simple Sentences';
$txt['n_02g'] = 'Test Lesson 2 G';
// name generator
$txt['g_n_try'] = 'Nice try. ;D';
$txt['g_first_name'] = 'First Name # of Syllables';
$txt['g_family_name'] = 'Family Name # of Syllables';
$txt['g_parent_name'] = 'Parent&apos;s Name # of Syllables';
$txt['g_number_of_name'] = 'Number of Names to Generate';
$txt['g_credits'] = '<a href="http://forum.learnnavi.org/index.php?msg=566249">
      Web-based Na\'vi Name Generator!
    </a> by Uniltìrantokx te Skxawng'
;
$txt['g_generate'] = 'Generate!';
// about
$txt['a_creator'] = 'Creator of the language';
$txt['a_developers'] = 'Tirea Na\'vi Lesson Blog Developers';
$txt['a_thanks'] = 'Special Thanks';
$txt['a_others'] = 'and others!';
$txt['a_3rdparty'] = 'Third Party Software';
$txt['a_mit'] = 'Licensed under The MIT License (MIT)';
?>


lessons/01c-english.md:
Code: (markdown) [Select]
# Greetings & Introductions

Hello, and welcome to the first of a new series of Na'vi Language lessons! If you haven't already, I highly recommend that you check out the audio clips on the [Sounds](http://localhost/material/?p=sounds) page to get a solid feel for how the language is pronounced. Here are some of the classic building blocks of getting started with conversation in Na'vi.

## Topics

### [Saying Hello](#1)

### [How are you?](#2)

### [I'm well / not well / so-so](#3)

### [My name is / I am](#4)

### [What's your name?](#5)

### [Goodbye](#6)

### [Dialogue](#d)

### [Vocabulary Learned](#v)

<span id="1">
</span>

## Saying Hello

The Na'vi word for _hello_ is **kaltxì**.

Another popular greeting you may remember from the film is

- **Oel ngati kameie.**
- _I see you_

A breakdown:

- **oel** is a form of _I_.
- **ngati** is a form of _you_.
- **kameie** is a form of the verb _to See [in a deep spiritual sense]_.

You may be asking, "Doesn't that say, _'I you See'_?" And you'd be correct; it does say that. In the Na'vi language, the word order is much more flexible than that of English. More about that later. For now, we will keep it simple.

When you want to address someone directly by their name or title, the word **ma** must be used just before the name. For example:

- **Kaltxì ma Neytiri!**
- _Hello, Neytiri!_

And one from the film:

- **Ma sempul, oel ngati kameie.**
- _Father, I see you._

<span id="2">
</span>

## How are you?

The Na'vi do not really ask, "_How are you?_", but rather something more like "_Do you have peace/well-being?_" Here's how it works:

- **Ngaru lu fpom srak?**
- _Do you have peace/well-being?_
- Literally: "To you is peace/well-being (yes/no)?"

A breakdown:

- **ngaru** is another form of _you_ that means _to you_.
- **lu** is the verb _am/are/is/be_.
- **fpom** is _peace/well-being_.
- **srak** is a word that changes a statement into a yes/no question. It goes at the end of the sentence, or at the very beginning as **srake**

<span id="3">
</span>

## I'm well / not well / so-so

Since _How are you_ in Na'vi is actually a yes/no question, its answers include the following:

- **Srane.** _Yes._
- **Kehe.** _No._
- **Tam ke tam.** A phrase that basically means _meh_ or _so-so_.

To ask the question back to whoever asked you first, you have two options:

- **ngaru lu fpom srak?**
- _Do you have well-being?_

or

- **ngaru tut?**
- _How about you? / What about you?_

<span id="4">
</span>

## My name is / I am

Although in Na'vi you _could_ say literally,

- **Oeyä tstxo lu ____.**
- _My name is ____._

It's much more Na'vi-like to say it like this:

- **Oeru fko syaw ____.**
- _One calls me ____._
- Literally: "To me one calls ____."

Since the Na'vi language has flexible word order, if the above sentence gives you any trouble, you can change the word order. Perhaps to something like this:

- **Oeru syaw fko ____.**
- or
- **Fko oeru syaw ____.**

<span id="5">
</span>

## What's your name?

This question is very similar to its reply, which is found in the previous section. _What's your name?_ in Na'vi is more like _How are you called?_ and is typically worded like this:

- **Fyape fko syaw ngar?**
- _How are you called?_
- Literally: "How one calls to you?"

or:

- **Pefya syaw fko ngaru?**
- _How are you called?_
- Literally: "How calls one to you?"

Note that **Fyape/Pefya** are two forms of the same word, and **ngar/ngaru** are also two forms of the same word.

- _Nice to meet you_ in Na'vi translates to **Smon nìprrte'.**
- Literally: "[you are] familiar [to me] pleasurably"

<span id="6">
</span>

## Goodbye

Here are some popular Na'vi goodbyes:

- **Kiyevame / Kìyevame**
- _See you again soon_

Either version is fine; Some use the version with i because it's easier, some use the version with ì because it looks cooler.

- **Eywa ngahu**
- _May Eywa be with you_
- Literally: Eywa you-with

And another one you may often see:

- **Hayalovay**
- _Until next time_

<span id="d">
</span>

## Dialogue

### Na'vi Transcript

- A: **Kaltxì! Ngaru lu fpom srak?**
- B: **Kaltxì! Srane, ngaru tut?**
- A: **Oeru lu fpom.**
- B: **Fyape syaw fko ngar?**
- A: **Oeru syaw (----). Fyape fko syaw ngaru?**
- B: **Smon nìprrte'. Oeru syaw (----).**
- A: **Smon nìprrte' nìteng.**
- B: **Kiyevame ulte Eywa ngahu!**
- A: **Hayalovay. Eywa ngahu!**

### English Translation

- A: _Hello! Do you have peace?_
- B: _Hello! Yes, how about you?_
- A: _I have peace._
- B: _How are you called?_
- A: _I'm called (----) How are you called?_
- B: _Nice to meet you. I'm (----)._
- A: _Nice to meet you too._
- B: _Goodbye and may Eywa be with you!_
- A: _Until next time. May Eywa be with you!_

<span id="v">
</span>

## Vocabulary Learned

Na'vi                   | English
----------------------- | -----------------------------------------------------------------------
**kaltxì**              | _hello_
**oel**                 | _I_
**ngati**               | _you_
**kameie**              | _See (deeply, spiritually)_
**ma**                  | _(word put before names or titles when addressing the person directly)_
**sempul**              | _father_
**ngaru**               | _to you_
**lu**                  | _is/am/are/be_
**fpom**                | _peace/well-being_
**srak / srake**        | _(word that creates yes/no questions)_
**srane**               | _yes_
**kehe**                | _no_
**tam ke tam**          | _so-so, meh_
**(----) tut?**         | _what about (----)?_
**oeyä**                | _my_
**tstxo**               | _name_
**fko**                 | _one, unspecified person_
**syaw**                | _call_
**fyape / pefya**       | _how_
**kiyevame / kìyevame** | _See you again soon_
**Eywa ngahu**          | _Eywa be with you_
**hayalovay**           | _until next time_
**nìteng**              | _too, as well_
**ulte**                | _and_

lessons/01g-english.md:
Code: (markdown) [Select]
# Word Order & Simple Sentences

**Kaltxì**! Hello! And welcome to The first installment of the Intro to Na'vi Grammar section of the Simplified Grammar Lessons Series.

This lesson will cover some very basic foundations of the grammar every beginner may want to start with in order to start making sentences.

**Makto ko!**

## Topics

### [Word Order](#1)

### [Simplest Sentences](#2)

### [L and T Endings](#3)

### [Vocabulary Learned](#v)

<span id="1">
</span>

## Word Order

The word order of English is very specific. In the simplest of sentences, it is always the same: The _Subject_ comes first, then the _Verb_. If there is an _Object_, then it comes after the verb (SVO order). For example:

> She runs. (_Subject Verb._)

> He cooks food. (_Subject Verb Object_.)

Word order in the Na'vi language, however, is very flexible unlike the rigid word order in English. For example:

- **Poe tul.**
- _She runs._

would mean the same thing as:

- **Tul poe.**
- _She runs._

<span id="2">
</span>

## Simplest Sentences

The simplest and easiest sentences in the Na'vi language are the two-word sentences, just like that one in the example above. All you need to do to make a sentence like this is follow these two simple steps:

1. Find a noun in the dictionary to use as the subject. (nouns are marked _n._ and pronouns are marked _pn._)
2. Find a verb in the dictionary to use. (verbs are marked _v._, _vin._, _svin._, _vim._, _vtr._, or _vtrm._)

These two words can be in either order, like the following example:

- **Payoang slele.**
- _The fish swims._

or

- **Slele payoang.**
- _The fish swims._

Note that whatever word comes last in the sentence is the one that carries the most emphasis in the sentence.

<span id="3">
</span>

## L and T Endings

In all the previous sentences, there was only one noun and one verb, and no modifications. But what happens when there are two (or more) nouns involved in the action of the verb?

In English, the word order of a sentence establishes the roles of the people or things involved. For example, compare these two sentences:

> Peyral hunts an animal. (_subject is Peyral, object is animal_)

> An animal hunts Peyral. (_subject is animal, object is Peyral_)

As you see, the roles are switched by changing which one comes before the verb and which one comes after the verb.

In Na'vi, however, since the word order in a sentence like this one is entirely flexible, word order itself tells us nothing about the roles. Instead, the Na'vi use what are called Cases, which are small changes to the _words_ to keep track of their roles. The above sentences would translate to the following:

- **Peyralìl taron ioangit.**
- Peyral-ìl taron ioang-it.
- _Peyral hunts an animal._

As you see here above, the **-ìl** case ending marks **Peyral** as the _subject_ and the **-it** case ending marks **ioang** as the _object_.

- **Peyralit taron ioangìl.**
- Peyral-it taron ioang-ìl.
- _An animal hunts Peyral._

Notice how the word order here stayed the same yet the roles were reversed simply by swapping the **-ìl** and **-it** case endings.

A famous example of this kind of sentence structure to remember is:

- **Oel ngati kame.**
- Oe-l nga-ti kame.
- _I See you._

This word order of "Subject object verb" (SOV) is quite commonly used. Also, here, we see other forms of **-ìl** and **-it** cases which are **-l** and **-ti**. (**-it** / **-ti** also has one last form, which is **-t**) These alternative forms exists for the sake of making nouns easier to pronounce when using these case endings.

In order to make any sentence of this type, just follow these steps:

1. Look up the verb you want to use. **make sure it is marked as _vtr._ or _vtrm._** (If it's not, then you can't use -l and -t cases on the nouns)
2. Look up the noun you want to use as the subject doing the action and add **-l** or **-ìl** onto the end of it. (**-ìl** if the noun ends with a consonant, **-l** if it ends with a vowel)
3. Look up the noun you want to use as the object receiving the action and add **-t** or **-it** or **-ti** onto the end of it.(**-t** if the noun ends with a vowel, **-it** if it ends with consonant, **-ti** always works)

These three words can be in any order. Again, note that whatever word comes last in the sentence is the one that carries the most emphasis.

<span id="v">
</span>

## Vocabulary Learned

Na'vi       | English
----------- | ---------------------------------
**poe**     | pn. _she_
**tul**     | vin. _run_
**payoang** | n. _fish_
**slele**   | vin. _swim_
**Peyral**  | prop. n. (_A female Na'vi name_)
**taron**   | vtr. _hunt_
**ioang**   | n. _animal_
**oe**      | pn. _I_
**nga**     | pn. _you_
**kame**    | vtr. _See (deep spiritual sense)_

You may either fork the repository on GitHub (https://github.com/Titstewan/Tirea-Material-Lesson-Blog) to submit a pull request, or you could simply translate those and attach them in a reply post in this thread. :D Esperanto and German translations are already underway. Any other languages, such as maybe Polish, Czech, Russian, Hungarian, etc. would be really cool to also have. :D
« Last Edit: March 29, 2017, 11:10:28 am by Tirea Aean »

kelku ikranä a hawnventi yom podcast (na'vi-only): https://tirearadio.com/podcast
Learn Na'vi Discord Chat: https://discord.gg/WF6qcmv

Offline Tìtstewan

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Re: Easy Na'vi Lessons Blog
« Reply #124 on: March 30, 2017, 03:31:16 am »
Kaltxì!

For those who are curious: here we have the new site as test online http://tirea.learnnavi.org/test/index.php  :)

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Offline Tirea Aean

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Re: Easy Na'vi Lessons Blog
« Reply #125 on: March 31, 2017, 08:35:46 am »
Note to self, edit reply #124

EDIT: All up to date now.

via LG-K550 (Tapatalk)

« Last Edit: March 31, 2017, 09:19:43 am by Tirea Aean »

kelku ikranä a hawnventi yom podcast (na'vi-only): https://tirearadio.com/podcast
Learn Na'vi Discord Chat: https://discord.gg/WF6qcmv

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Re: Easy Na'vi Lessons Blog
« Reply #126 on: March 31, 2017, 02:00:19 pm »
You may either fork the repository on GitHub (https://github.com/Titstewan/Tirea-Material-Lesson-Blog) to submit a pull request, or you could simply translate those and attach them in a reply post in this thread. :D Esperanto and German translations are already underway. Any other languages, such as maybe Polish, Czech, Russian, Hungarian, etc. would be really cool to also have. :D

Done! :D
Stress practiceNoun declensionsVerb infixes •  Weather forecasts in Na'viKDE nìNa'viMy Na'vi blog
Seykxel sì nitram! Ngal rolun fì'upxaret aketsuktse'a! :D

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Re: Easy Na'vi Lessons Blog
« Reply #127 on: March 31, 2017, 02:26:41 pm »
You may either fork the repository on GitHub (https://github.com/Titstewan/Tirea-Material-Lesson-Blog) to submit a pull request, or you could simply translate those and attach them in a reply post in this thread. :D Esperanto and German translations are already underway. Any other languages, such as maybe Polish, Czech, Russian, Hungarian, etc. would be really cool to also have. :D

Done! :D
Txantsaaan! :D I've merged your pull request. http://tirea.learnnavi.org/test has been updated.

via LG-K550 (Tapatalk)


kelku ikranä a hawnventi yom podcast (na'vi-only): https://tirearadio.com/podcast
Learn Na'vi Discord Chat: https://discord.gg/WF6qcmv

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Re: Easy Na'vi Lessons Blog
« Reply #128 on: March 31, 2017, 02:33:40 pm »
You may either fork the repository on GitHub (https://github.com/Titstewan/Tirea-Material-Lesson-Blog) to submit a pull request, or you could simply translate those and attach them in a reply post in this thread. :D Esperanto and German translations are already underway. Any other languages, such as maybe Polish, Czech, Russian, Hungarian, etc. would be really cool to also have. :D

Done! :D
Txantsaaan! :D I've merged your pull request. http://tirea.learnnavi.org/test has been updated.

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Updated again. :D Nederlands should now be in language menu :D

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Re: Easy Na'vi Lessons Blog
« Reply #129 on: April 02, 2017, 05:57:38 pm »
So now we have Dutch, Czech, Esperanto, German, Na'vi and French. ;)

 

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