General Math Discussion [moved from /intro/pics]

Started by Ftiafpi, September 02, 2011, 02:35:20 PM

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Ftiafpi


Txura Rolyu

Yes math is important, but being artistic allows the mind to create things and apply math to it to make it a real physical thing. I am sure Engineers work with artists who draw ideas out then allow the eng. to make sure it can be built srak?
Quote from: Ekirä on March 30, 2011, 04:45:34 PMNeytiri: Now you choose your woman. This you must feel inside. If she also chooses you, move quick like I showed.
Jake: How will I know if she chooses me?
Neytiri: She will try to kill you.
Jake: Outstanding. *takes out an ikran-catcher and walks through hometree looking for women*

Kamean

Tse'a ngal ke'ut a krr fra'uti kame.


Txura Rolyu

Quote from: Ekirä on March 30, 2011, 04:45:34 PMNeytiri: Now you choose your woman. This you must feel inside. If she also chooses you, move quick like I showed.
Jake: How will I know if she chooses me?
Neytiri: She will try to kill you.
Jake: Outstanding. *takes out an ikran-catcher and walks through hometree looking for women*

Ftiafpi

Quote from: Txura Rolyu on September 02, 2011, 02:38:30 PM
Yes math is important, but being artistic allows the mind to create things and apply math to it to make it a real physical thing. I am sure Engineers work with artists who draw ideas out then allow the eng. to make sure it can be built srak?
Oh, I agree, but I find a balance of both is the best way to go, shunning one or the other is never good. I try to embrace both equally (though I happen to be better at math).

As for being an engineer I'd say that artistic qualities aren't really a factor in many of my designs as their mostly industrial. However, elegant solutions, thinking outside the box, and creative problem solving are definitely a big factor in being an engineer.

Plus, you can definitely find beauty in math. E=mc^2 is probably the most beautiful equation I've ever seen.

Lance R. Casey

Quote from: Ftiafpi on September 02, 2011, 04:53:25 PM
Plus, you can definitely find beauty in math. E=mc^2 is probably the most beautiful equation I've ever seen.

What about the classic eπi + 1 = 0 ? ;)

// Lance R. Casey

Seze Mune

Quote from: Ftiafpi on September 02, 2011, 04:53:25 PM
Quote from: Txura Rolyu on September 02, 2011, 02:38:30 PM
Yes math is important, but being artistic allows the mind to create things and apply math to it to make it a real physical thing. I am sure Engineers work with artists who draw ideas out then allow the eng. to make sure it can be built srak?
Oh, I agree, but I find a balance of both is the best way to go, shunning one or the other is never good. I try to embrace both equally (though I happen to be better at math).

As for being an engineer I'd say that artistic qualities aren't really a factor in many of my designs as their mostly industrial. However, elegant solutions, thinking outside the box, and creative problem solving are definitely a big factor in being an engineer.

Plus, you can definitely find beauty in math. E=mc^2 is probably the most beautiful equation I've ever seen.

Where was it I read that Einstein intuited the way the universe works and backengineered the math?  This was a quote of his...  Anyway, intuition before engineering?

Vawm tsamsiyu

Quote from: Kamean on September 02, 2011, 02:51:55 PM
I also don't like maths. :P
I hate math because math hates me and never let's me get it right  :'(
they killed the [you] tag

'Oma Tirea

Quote from: Txura Rolyu on September 02, 2011, 02:38:30 PM
Yes math is important, but being artistic allows the mind to create things and apply math to it to make it a real physical thing. I am sure Engineers work with artists who draw ideas out then allow the eng. to make sure it can be built srak?

Srane, an artist is usually never alone :)

Quote from: Vawm tsamsiyu on September 02, 2011, 07:39:15 PM
Quote from: Kamean on September 02, 2011, 02:51:55 PM
I also don't like maths. :P
I hate math because math hates me and never let's me get it right  :'(

It could be that it's very technical, and that's what is throwing you off....

[img]http://swokaikran.skxawng.lu/sigbar/nwotd.php?p=2b[/img]

ÌTXTSTXRR!!

Srake serar le'Ìnglìsìa lì'fyayä aylì'ut?  Nari si älofoniru rutxe!!

DJ Makto

I used to hate math, but then I learned how to stop worrying and love the math.  8)

Ftiafpi


DJ Makto

Sigh, I guess another one of my pop-culture references failed again. :(

Txura Rolyu

I was the catalyst to cause this thread to become possible.  :P
Quote from: Ekirä on March 30, 2011, 04:45:34 PMNeytiri: Now you choose your woman. This you must feel inside. If she also chooses you, move quick like I showed.
Jake: How will I know if she chooses me?
Neytiri: She will try to kill you.
Jake: Outstanding. *takes out an ikran-catcher and walks through hometree looking for women*

Vawm tsamsiyu

I suggested it, go team go  ;D


Anyway, I've never had much luck with math, I'd try to do it get it wrong but not have any help getting it right  :(
they killed the [you] tag

'Oma Tirea

Quote from: Seze Mune on September 02, 2011, 07:03:39 PM
Quote from: Ftiafpi on September 02, 2011, 04:53:25 PM
Quote from: Txura Rolyu on September 02, 2011, 02:38:30 PM
Yes math is important, but being artistic allows the mind to create things and apply math to it to make it a real physical thing. I am sure Engineers work with artists who draw ideas out then allow the eng. to make sure it can be built srak?
Oh, I agree, but I find a balance of both is the best way to go, shunning one or the other is never good. I try to embrace both equally (though I happen to be better at math).

As for being an engineer I'd say that artistic qualities aren't really a factor in many of my designs as their mostly industrial. However, elegant solutions, thinking outside the box, and creative problem solving are definitely a big factor in being an engineer.

Plus, you can definitely find beauty in math. E=mc^2 is probably the most beautiful equation I've ever seen.

Where was it I read that Einstein intuited the way the universe works and backengineered the math?  This was a quote of his...  Anyway, intuition before engineering?

Perhaps.  After all, nearly every great mathematician or scientist in the world has been an intuiter, and even more of a thinker.  The personality type: INTP.

[img]http://swokaikran.skxawng.lu/sigbar/nwotd.php?p=2b[/img]

ÌTXTSTXRR!!

Srake serar le'Ìnglìsìa lì'fyayä aylì'ut?  Nari si älofoniru rutxe!!

Clarke

Quote from: Seze Mune on September 02, 2011, 07:03:39 PM
Quote from: Ftiafpi on September 02, 2011, 04:53:25 PM
Quote from: Txura Rolyu on September 02, 2011, 02:38:30 PM
Yes math is important, but being artistic allows the mind to create things and apply math to it to make it a real physical thing. I am sure Engineers work with artists who draw ideas out then allow the eng. to make sure it can be built srak?
Oh, I agree, but I find a balance of both is the best way to go, shunning one or the other is never good. I try to embrace both equally (though I happen to be better at math).

As for being an engineer I'd say that artistic qualities aren't really a factor in many of my designs as their mostly industrial. However, elegant solutions, thinking outside the box, and creative problem solving are definitely a big factor in being an engineer.

Plus, you can definitely find beauty in math. E=mc^2 is probably the most beautiful equation I've ever seen.

Where was it I read that Einstein intuited the way the universe works and backengineered the math?  This was a quote of his...  Anyway, intuition before engineering?
I'd be surprised, since Relativity follows rather elegantly from the maths of electromagnetism.

Seze Mune

Quote from: Thomas R on September 05, 2011, 09:57:54 AM
Quote from: Seze Mune on September 02, 2011, 07:03:39 PM
Quote from: Ftiafpi on September 02, 2011, 04:53:25 PM
Quote from: Txura Rolyu on September 02, 2011, 02:38:30 PM
Yes math is important, but being artistic allows the mind to create things and apply math to it to make it a real physical thing. I am sure Engineers work with artists who draw ideas out then allow the eng. to make sure it can be built srak?
Oh, I agree, but I find a balance of both is the best way to go, shunning one or the other is never good. I try to embrace both equally (though I happen to be better at math).

As for being an engineer I'd say that artistic qualities aren't really a factor in many of my designs as their mostly industrial. However, elegant solutions, thinking outside the box, and creative problem solving are definitely a big factor in being an engineer.

Plus, you can definitely find beauty in math. E=mc^2 is probably the most beautiful equation I've ever seen.

Where was it I read that Einstein intuited the way the universe works and backengineered the math?  This was a quote of his...  Anyway, intuition before engineering?
I'd be surprised, since Relativity follows rather elegantly from the maths of electromagnetism.

Please allow me to offer you this quote, and note the portion highlighted in red:

"For Einstein, insight did not come from logic or mathematics. It came, as it does for artists, from intuition and inspiration. As he told one friend, "When I examine myself and my methods of thought, I come close to the conclusion that the gift of imagination has meant more to me than any talent for absorbing absolute knowledge." Elaborating, he added, "All great achievements of science must start from intuitive knowledge. I believe in intuition and inspiration.... At times I feel certain I am right while not knowing the reason." Thus, his famous statement that, for creative work in science, "Imagination is more important than knowledge" (Calaprice, 2000, 22, 287, 10).

But how, then, did art differ from science for Einstein? Surprisingly, it wasn't the content of an idea, or its subject, that determined whether something was art or science, but how the idea was expressed. "If what is seen and experienced is portrayed in the language of logic, then it is science. If it is communicated through forms whose constructions are not accessible to the conscious mind but are recognized intuitively, then it is art" (Calaprice, 2000, 271). Einstein himself worked intuitively and expressed himself logically. That's why he said that great scientists were also artists.

Einstein first described his intuitive thought processes at a physics conference in Kyoto in 1922, when he indicated that he used images to solve his problems and found words later (Pais, 1982). Einstein explicated this bold idea at length to one scholar of creativity in 1959, telling Max Wertheimer that he never thought in logical symbols or mathematical equations, but in images, feelings, and even musical architectures (Wertheimer, 1959, 213-228). Einstein's autobiographical notes reflect the same thought: "I have no doubt that our thinking goes on for the most part without the use of symbols, and, furthermore, largely unconsciously" (Schilpp, pp. 8-9). Elsewhere he wrote even more baldly that "[n]o scientist thinks in equations" (Infeld, 1941, 312)......"

[There are a few very interesting paragraphs in here which you might want to read:  http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/imagine/201003/einstein-creative-thinking-music-and-the-intuitive-art-scientific-imagination ]

".......These speculations about music, space and time in Einstein's imaginative thinking certainly fit with something the physicist told the great pioneer of musical education, Shinichi Suzuki: "The theory of relativity occurred to me by intuition, and music is the driving force behind this intuition. My parents had me study the violin from the time I was six. My new discovery is the result of musical perception" (Suzuki, 1969, 90)...."