Author Topic: Climate research on states in U.S  (Read 1731 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Tsanten Eywa 'eveng

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • Posts: 3875
  • no Norway
  • Karma: 23
  • Tsanten Eywa 'eveng
    • Oe new slivu taronyu - Ngay Tìrey Na'vì Tskaha - pìlok Tsantenä Eywa 'eveng
Climate research on states in U.S
« on: April 27, 2012, 11:41:40 am »
I am doing some research for climate's over different states in USA. Because I think I will never go with to buy land from owners, I fear that we can be fooled. So I've heard that in USA, you can choose a part of land on your own, If it was that I heard



Oregon's climate:
Oregon's climate – particularly in the western part of the state – is heavily influenced by the Pacific Ocean. The climate is mild, but periods of extreme hot and cold can affect parts of the state. Oregon's population centers, which lie mostly in the western part of the state, are moist and mild, while the lightly populated high deserts of Central and Eastern Oregon are much drier. Oregon's highest recorded temperature is 119 °F (48 °C) at Pendleton on August 10, 1898, and the lowest recorded temperature is −54 °F (−48 °C) at Seneca on February 10, 1933.

Idaho's climate:
Idaho has much variation in its climate. Although the state's western border is located about 350 miles (560 km) from the Pacific Ocean, the maritime influence is still felt in Idaho, especially in the winter when cloud cover, humidity, and precipitation are at their maximum extent. This influence has a moderating effect in the winter where temperatures are not as low as would otherwise be expected for a northern state with a predominantly elevated altitude. The maritime influence is least prominent in the eastern part of the state where the precipitation patterns are often reversed, with wetter summers and drier winters, and seasonal temperature differences more extreme, showing a more semi-arid continental climate.
Climate in Idaho can be hot, although extended periods over 100 °F (38 °C) for the maximum temperature are rare, except for the lowest point in elevation, Lewiston, which correspondingly sees very little snow. Hot summer days are tempered by the low relative humidity and cooler evenings during summer months since, for most of the state, the highest diurnal difference in temperature is often in the summer. Winters can be cold, although extended periods of bitter cold weather below zero are unusual. This is what led the railroad tycoon Harriman family to develop the most famous ski resort, Sun Valley. Idaho's all time highest temperature of 118 °F (48 °C) was recorded at Orofino on July 28, 1934; the all time lowest temperature of −60 °F (−51 °C) was recorded at Island Park Dam on January 18, 1943.

Wyoming's climate:

Nebraska's climate:

Iowa's climate:

Illinois's climate:

Kentucky's climate:
Located within the southeastern interior portion of North America, Kentucky has a climate that can best be described as a humid subtropical climate. Monthly average temperatures in Kentucky range from a summer daytime high of 87 °F (31 °C) to a winter low of 23 °F (−5 °C). The average precipitation is 46 inches (1,200 mm) a year. Kentucky experiences all four seasons, usually with striking variations in the severity of summer and winter from year to year. Kentucky's highest recorded temperature was 114 °F (46 °C) at Greensburg on July 28, 1930 while the lowest recorded temperature was −34 °F (−37 °C) at Cynthiana on January 28, 1963.

Arkansas's climate:

Colorado's climate:
The climate of Colorado is quite complex compared to most of the United States. Unlike in other states, southern Colorado is not necessarily warmer than northern Colorado. Most of Colorado is made up of mountains, foothills, high plains, and desert lands. Mountains and surrounding valleys greatly affect local climate. As a general rule, with an increase in elevation comes a decrease in temperature and an increase in precipitation. Northeast, east, and southeast Colorado are mostly the high plains, while Northern Colorado is a mix of high plains, foothills, and mountains. Northwest and west Colorado are predominantly mountainous, with some desert lands mixed in. Southwest and southern Colorado are a complex mixture of desert and mountain areas.

Utah's climate:

Kansas's climate:

Missouri's climate:

Offline Yawne Zize’ite

  • Uniltìranyu
  • **
  • Posts: 176
  • Karma: 4
Re: Climate research on states in U.S
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2012, 12:03:13 am »
I'm not a member of the tribe and don't intend to be (I like modern conveniences, especially the medicines keeping me alive), but I do live in the USA and wanted to say a few words about the climate.

Compared to Western Europe, all but the Pacific fringe of the US is harsh. In the southern parts, high temperatures are usually over 30 C in the summer and frequently over 35 C. Winter daytime temperatures are usually in the single digits C, but they sometimes fall below freezing; the South doesn't get much snow, but every few years an ice storm comes. In the Midwest, temperatures over 35 C are rare, but snow is an annual occurrence and the coldest winter nights can be below -20 C. New England doesn't have the extremes, since summer highs rarely go above the lower 30s and winter lows are usually around -10 C, but expect several months of constant snow cover in the winter. Areas around the Great Lakes can receive meters of snow. The deserts, of course, have extreme temperatures.

Something else Western Europeans may not be prepared for: the US is at a much lower latitude, so summer days are short and winter days are long. Today only had 15 hours of light. On the other hand, the shortest day of the year in my town will still have 9.5 hours of light. This also means shorter periods of twilight.

The US also has more natural disasters. Thunderstorms are very common in most areas in spring and summer; they're not too dangerous, but it's better to be inside if possible. They're worth paying attention to because strong thunderstorms, in addition to blowing down tree limbs (and rarely entire trees), can spawn tornadoes. I wouldn't worry much about tornado distribution over-much, because there's nothing you can do about them except move to another country (although New England doesn't get many). Generally, the farther south and west (before reaching desert), the more tornadoes.

Hurricanes are mostly a threat to coastal areas; hundreds of kilometers inland, a hurricane will have degenerated into a particularly large thunderstorm. The threat to inland areas is freshwater flooding; large thunderstorms drop lots of rain. Hurricanes do have the virtue that you have several days' warning.

Earthquakes are mostly a threat to the Pacific coast and the middle Mississippi Valley; earthquakes cause most of their damage by making structures collapse, so they might not be a factor worth considering.

Excepting Alaska and Hawaii, all of the US's active volcanoes are in the Cascade Range on the Pacific coast.

Wildfires are a serious problem in the southwestern US and California.

Native peoples survived all the natural hazards of the US without heavily built houses or weather forecasters, so researching what they did to cope with threats would be extremely valuable. For hurricanes in particular, there should be some information on how South Pacific islanders deal with cyclones that could be applied as well.

Offline Tsmuktengan

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 1481
  • Karma: 13
Re: Climate research on states in U.S
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2012, 07:27:40 pm »
Thank you very much for this very detailed research. This will certainly end up on our new website.

I think we are able to adapt to new climates and temperatures between 25 and 35°C. In fact, as long as we know what we get into, we can adapt, for most of us.


Offline Seze Mune

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 2052
  • Karma: 39
  • Fwa kan ke lu nìtam. Nga zene swizawit livonu.
    • Our fun & awesome RP: Aysautral
Re: Climate research on states in U.S
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2012, 08:49:12 pm »
Perhaps you should research the availability of fresh water as well.  In states like Arkansas and Colorado and others, water is becoming a scarce commodity and people are beginning to fight over water rights.

Offline Tsmuktengan

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 1481
  • Karma: 13
Re: Climate research on states in U.S
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2012, 04:09:14 am »
Perhaps you should research the availability of fresh water as well.  In states like Arkansas and Colorado and others, water is becoming a scarce commodity and people are beginning to fight over water rights.

Absolutely! This is indeed essential (I in fact just wrote this on the draft for the project website, but forgot that detail here). If possible, also look for potential data on the toxicity of the local rivers (some can be polluted by agriculture, mining, factories, etc).


Offline Seze Mune

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 2052
  • Karma: 39
  • Fwa kan ke lu nìtam. Nga zene swizawit livonu.
    • Our fun & awesome RP: Aysautral
Re: Climate research on states in U.S
« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2012, 10:39:29 pm »
Most municipalities in the US have an official Comprehensive Development Plan; as you sort out likely areas and narrow it down to your best few choices, make sure that you investigate their plans for development.

It would not be good to buy a piece of property only to find out later that a part of the area might be annexed for an expressway, or might be claimed by "imminent domain" for commercial development or landfills.

Often State agricultural universities have mapped the state's soils, and this would be good information particularly if you planned on growing your own food or raising animals.

Offline Meuiama Tsamsiyu (Toruk Makto)

  • Omatikaya
  • ****
  • *
  • Posts: 423
  • Karma: 7
  • Nawma Tsamsiyu, Olo'eyktan fpi Omatikayaä
    • Avatar Role Play, hosted by Makto Fa'lihu.
Re: Climate research on states in U.S
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2012, 03:42:45 pm »
Ma Tsmuktengan.

Please note that I live in Oregon. You are very right. The Cascades of this state and Washington are the dividing point between temperate and arid. In the west is lush, damp, moss covered forest floors.

In this YouTube of the movie called The Hunted starring Tommy Lee Jones and Benicio Del Toro, you can see how lush and green we are here. The trees are mighty, mostly deciduous, but extremely tall fir and pine trees in the rockier areas. Also be aware Silver Falls, Oregon is a real location and I have been there personally a few times. Just amazing.

THIS video is about an hour or so east of the moist/arid divide I mentioned above. This is the Crooked River Canyon area and sadly, a point where many commit suicide. That said, just look at the beauty here. Many junipers and dry grasses. Fires propogate in this region and there are rarely tall trees unless they are in a wind protected area

This is the Blues Mountains, IMHO, a very likely place for a clan to develope. Many rivers and streams and the forests are taller here once into the ridges. A very long and generally boring stretch of interstate but you can note how just turning a corner, the trees can fall away and become a grass covered slope and back again. Deer and antelope, elk, bear, mountain lion, rabbit, much hunting is available here. Most of the trees you will see in THIS video are pine, but you can find stretches of mighty fir (timestamd 3:15) and also if you watch movies like Rooster Cogburn, Paint Your Wagons or The Postman, you will see Oregon as those and many many more movies are filmed here. The Ring, Kindergarten Cop, Goonies, Short Circuit.



"He who destroys a good book kills reason itself." -John Milton

"Mathematics is the gate and key to the sciences." -Roger Bacon

"There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." -Socrates

Offline Meuiama Tsamsiyu (Toruk Makto)

  • Omatikaya
  • ****
  • *
  • Posts: 423
  • Karma: 7
  • Nawma Tsamsiyu, Olo'eyktan fpi Omatikayaä
    • Avatar Role Play, hosted by Makto Fa'lihu.
Re: Climate research on states in U.S
« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2012, 03:56:35 pm »
Welcome to the Columbia River Gorge. You can see all the various geology that made this such a beautiful state, here. Earthquakes, volcanoes and geological uplift have shaped this region.

Note the above sigh stating 6% downgrade on the prior post. That is Cabbage Hill... it is one of the steepest stretches on Oregons Interstate highways.

Now, The Gorge I-84 East (OR), Columbia River Gorge, Part 1 of 2, Mile 18 To Mile 53



"He who destroys a good book kills reason itself." -John Milton

"Mathematics is the gate and key to the sciences." -Roger Bacon

"There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." -Socrates

Offline Tsmuktengan

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 1481
  • Karma: 13
Re: Climate research on states in U.S
« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2012, 11:12:39 pm »
Very interesting. My main worry is now the temperature of the regions, that all seems cold most of the year, with only two or three months of hot or comfortable temperatures.


Offline Meuiama Tsamsiyu (Toruk Makto)

  • Omatikaya
  • ****
  • *
  • Posts: 423
  • Karma: 7
  • Nawma Tsamsiyu, Olo'eyktan fpi Omatikayaä
    • Avatar Role Play, hosted by Makto Fa'lihu.
Re: Climate research on states in U.S
« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2012, 03:39:29 am »
With shelter, one survives. Trust me, we are a good climate mix. I would rather Oregon or Washington for this effort than say, Montana or southern California or Texas. IMHO, mountains would provide the best water and the best shelter against the weather.



"He who destroys a good book kills reason itself." -John Milton

"Mathematics is the gate and key to the sciences." -Roger Bacon

"There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." -Socrates

Offline Tsanten Eywa 'eveng

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • Posts: 3875
  • no Norway
  • Karma: 23
  • Tsanten Eywa 'eveng
    • Oe new slivu taronyu - Ngay Tìrey Na'vì Tskaha - pìlok Tsantenä Eywa 'eveng
Re: Climate research on states in U.S
« Reply #10 on: June 15, 2012, 08:03:50 am »
Very good find, Meuiama Tsamsiyu :)


Irayo ;)

Offline Niri Te

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 1256
  • Karma: 23
  • Yayo Alefngap Tswayonyu
Re: Climate research on states in U.S
« Reply #11 on: June 15, 2012, 08:15:37 am »
 I agree with Turok Makto about the climate of Washington State, where I lived, 60 miles north of Spokane in the mountains for 2 years, before I moved to American Samoa. Oeyä lora yawnetu and I have property in the mountains of southern New Mexico that is 45 minutes by air from our "Sky Ranch" in the high desert of far west Texas. The mountain property is half a mile from a small municipal airstrip, and is covered in 200 foot tall Ponderosa Pines, where, when the temperature at our "Sky Ranch" is 102, the temperature at our mountain place is 75 degrees, so it is actually a bit COOLER in the summer than it was in north east Washington State where I lived. If you get up into the mountains, it is far easier for those that are new to wilderness living to not only "make it", but to actually ENJOY themselves doing it.
 My place in Washington State taken from an aircraft. is below.
Niri Te

Tokx alu tawtute, Tirea Le Na'vi

Offline Tsmuktengan

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 1481
  • Karma: 13
Re: Climate research on states in U.S
« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2012, 08:32:56 am »
I will add this to the site as soon as I have a minute. I have got so many things to add.


 

Become LearnNavi's friend on Facebook Follow LearnNavi on Twitter! Watch LearnNavi's videos on YouTube

SMF 2.0.17 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines | XHTML | RSS | WAP2 | Site Rules

LearnNavi is not affiliated with the official Avatar website,
James Cameron, LightStorm Entertainment or The Walt Disney Company.
All trademarks and servicemarks are the properties of their respective owners.
Images in the LearnNavi.org Forums and Gallery may not be used without permission.

LearnNavi Affiliates:
ToS

LearnNavi is the community to learn Na'vi, the Avatar Language
"A place where real friendships are made." -Paul Frommer

AvatarMeet | Learn Na'vi Forum | Learn Na'vi Wiki | Na'viteri

LearnNavi