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Science / Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Last post by Toliman on Yesterday at 09:32:19 am »
 
M16*, M18*, M21*
*There seemed to be a tiny bit of nebulosity so I'm not sure
M16 - Eagle Nebula (xD), how good sky conditions were? Did you observed before moonrise?
Yes, I observed before moonrise. I would say the transparency was good although my telescope was wet (just not the lenses).
Of course it was just a bit of something around two stars, I didn't see the entire nebula. ;)
Yeah, then you could see the brightest part of this nebula :) With good transparency I was able to see this the brightest part of M16 even on urban sky through my first telescope, smaller refractor.

Did you tried similarly bright M20?
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Science / Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Last post by Vawmataw on Yesterday at 09:23:38 am »
M16*, M18*, M21*
*There seemed to be a tiny bit of nebulosity so I'm not sure
M16 - Eagle Nebula (xD), how good sky conditions were? Did you observed before moonrise?
Yes, I observed before moonrise. I would say the transparency was good although my telescope was wet (just not the lenses).
Of course it was just a bit of something around two stars, I didn't see the entire nebula. Same thing with M8, there was nebulosity around NGC 6530 and a pair of stars nearby, but it was more visible. ;)
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Hello my friends


I thank you. After the figure now the doll. :D


[Fate/Apocrypha] Ruler (Fashion Doll)


Jeanne D`Arc by Mandarake has arrived yesterday. She looks fantastic, but was complicated to dress.














A few photos from the garden. Since you can see the flag better. :)









Greetings,

Eichhörnchen
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Contest Entry Form
http://naviteri.org/2021/07/contest-entry-form/
Posted on July 31, 2021 by Pawl


Kaltxì nìmun, ma frapo!

I hope you’ve been having fun coming up with new Na’vi proverbs and idioms. Now it’s time to submit your entries!

I used Google Forms to create the entry form. (Fingers crossed that I did it correctly!) You’ll find it here:

https://forms.gle/ctcwr11JM8KyG5j29

As you’ll see, I’ve asked you to enter a 7-digit code (example: 9272031) that will be unique to you. I’ll announce the winning entries via these codes, and then the winners can identify themselves.

You can submit either one proverb, or one idiom, or one of each.

Deadline for submission:
Saturday, 7 August 2021, midnight PDT (Pacific Daylight Time).

Furia tse’a aysäfpìlìt ayngeyä, srefereiey nìprrte’ nìngay!

ta P.


15
Science / Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Last post by Toliman on Yesterday at 04:00:59 am »
Nice observation! We had rain tonight hrh

That is good question, behavior of this nova is really unique. Really I am not sure why it behaves in this way.
And after being bright it's dim again HRH
Ngary, I am curious whether there will be any next surprise about this nova xD

M16*, M18*, M21*
*There seemed to be a tiny bit of nebulosity so I'm not sure
M16 - Eagle Nebula (xD), how good sky conditions were? Did you observed before moonrise?
16
Off-topic / Re: Bratwurstimpfung
« Last post by Passi on Yesterday at 01:23:50 am »
Toll, jetzt hab ich wieder Hunger.....

Und ich Idiot hab nicht lange genug gewartet.  ;)

Passi
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Science / Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Last post by Vawmataw on Yesterday at 12:11:07 am »
That is good question, behavior of this nova is really unique. Really I am not sure why it behaves in this way.
And after being bright it's dim again HRH


Objects that I've seen tonight: M2, M8, M13, M15, M16*, M17, M18*, M21*, M22, M24, M25, M31, M32, M57, IC 4665, NGC 457, NGC 869, NGC 884

Solar system objects: Jupiter and the galilean moons, Saturn and Titan, 12 Victoria

Other: Nova Cassiopeiae (again!) and ISS

*There seemed to be a tiny bit of nebulosity so I'm not sure
18
Science / Re: Space news topic and space related news
« Last post by Toliman on July 31, 2021, 06:31:47 pm »
Astronomers Uncover Briefest Supernova-Powered Gamma-Ray Burst
https://www.gemini.edu/pr/astronomers-uncover-briefest-supernova-powered-gamma-ray-burst

Astronomers have discovered the shortest-ever gamma-ray burst (GRB) caused by the implosion of a massive star. Using the international Gemini Observatory, a Program of NSF’s NOIRLab, astronomers identified the cause of this 0.6-second flurry of gamma rays as a supernova explosion in a distant galaxy. GRBs caused by supernovae are usually more than twice as long, which suggests that some short GRBs might actually be imposters — supernova-produced GRBs in disguise.

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are among the brightest and most energetic events in the Universe, but scientists are still figuring out exactly what causes these fleeting events [1]. Astronomers divide GRBs into two broad categories based on their duration. Short GRBs blaze into life in less than two seconds and are thought to be caused by the merging of binary neutron stars [2]. Those that last longer are classified as long GRBs, and have been associated with supernova explosions caused by the implosions of massive stars [3]. However, the recent discovery of the shortest-ever GRB produced during a supernova shows that GRBs don’t fit neatly into the boxes astronomers have created for them.

“This discovery represents the shortest gamma-ray emission caused by a supernova during the collapse of a massive star,” commented Tomás Ahumada, who led this research and is a PhD candidate at the University of Maryland and astronomer at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. “It lasted for only 0.6 second, and it sits on the brink between a successful and a failed gamma-ray burst.”

The team believes that this and some other supernova-related GRBs are appearing short because the jets of gamma rays that emerge from the collapsing star’s poles aren’t strong enough to completely escape the star — almost failing to produce a GRB — and that other collapsing stars have such weak jets that they don’t produce GRBs at all.

This discovery could also help explain an astronomical mystery. Long GRBs are associated with a specific type of supernova (called Type Ic-BL). However, astronomers observe many more of these supernovae than long GRBs. This discovery of the shortest GRB associated with a supernova suggests that some of these supernova-caused GRBs are masquerading as short GRBs thought to be created by neutron-star mergers, and are therefore not getting counted as the supernova kind.

“Our discovery suggests that, since we observe many more of these supernovae than long gamma-ray bursts, most collapsing stars fail to produce a GRB jet that breaks through the outer envelope of the collapsing star,” explained Ahumada. “We think this event was effectively a fizzle, one that was close to not happening at all.”

The team was able to determine that this GRB — identified as GRB 200826A — originated from a supernova explosion thanks to the imaging capabilities of the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on Gemini North in Hawai‘i. The researchers used Gemini North to obtain images of the GRB’s host galaxy 28, 45, and 80 days after the GRB was first detected on 26 August 2020 by a network of observatories that included NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Gemini’s observations allowed the team to spot the tell-tale rise in energy that signifies a supernova, despite the blast’s location in a galaxy 6.6 billion light-years away.

“This was a complicated endeavor as we needed to separate the light of an already faint galaxy from the light of a supernova,” said Ahumada. “Gemini is the only ground-based telescope that can do follow-up observations like this with a flexible-enough schedule to let us squeeze in our observations.”

This result shows that classifying GRBs based solely on their duration may not be the best approach, and that additional observations are needed to determine a GRB’s cause.

"We were originally hunting for merging neutron stars, which are thought to produce short gamma-ray bursts," added Ahumada. "Once we discovered GRB 200826A, however, we realized that this burst was more likely to be caused by a collapsing star’s supernova, which was a surprise!"

“The Gemini observatories continue to shed new light on the nature of these incredible explosions occurring across the distant Universe,” said Martin Still, Gemini Program Officer at NSF. “Dedicated instrumentation arriving for use over the next decade will maintain Gemini’s leadership in the follow-up of these awe-inspiring cosmic events.”
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Off-topic / Re: Bratwurstimpfung
« Last post by Eichhörnchen on July 31, 2021, 07:54:14 am »
Hallo


Bier statt Wurst !?

Das wäre mal ein Angebot. ;D ;D ;D

LG,

Eichhörnchen
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Off-topic / Bratwurstimpfung
« Last post by pukapa nari on July 31, 2021, 03:32:02 am »

... im Clan von Atokirina' gibt's geimpfte Bratwürste ?!?
(... äh ~ wurden Bratwürste verimpft ... oder was geht da?)

https://www.mdr.de/nachrichten/thueringen/sued-thueringen/sonneberg/video-540768_zc-aeae417c_zs-384b6d67.html
Quote
... sehr erschdaund, wieviele doch früh schon um halb Sechs hier vor der Düür schdanden, w'mer grad den Rosd frisch angeschürd ham ...

Hmm ... als Schluckimpfung wär's ja echt nicht schlecht ~ aber dann wäre sicher der Wunsch vieler: Bier statt Wurst !?

Mahlzeit!
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