Author Topic: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia  (Read 27595 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Niri Te

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 1256
  • Karma: 23
  • Yayo Alefngap Tswayonyu
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #60 on: February 16, 2013, 03:58:11 pm »
 I liked your photos of Jupiter.
Tokx alu tawtute, Tirea Le Na'vi

Offline Kamean

  • Eywatsyìp
  • ******
  • *
  • Posts: 10804
  • Karma: 64
  • Oe lu tute a tsun stivawm Eywayä mokrit
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #61 on: February 16, 2013, 04:05:32 pm »
Tse'a ngal ke'ut a krr fra'uti kame.


Offline Vawmataw

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 5494
  • nv Eywa'eveng
  • Karma: 91
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #62 on: February 16, 2013, 04:16:13 pm »
I liked your photos of Jupiter.
I liked your photos of Jupiter.
:D
Thanks.

You don't need a professional camera for this. ;)

Offline Vawmataw

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 5494
  • nv Eywa'eveng
  • Karma: 91
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #63 on: February 16, 2013, 06:40:30 pm »
 
KameyuaKepekmi: @Mercurius @Ares I'll get you a day! (3 hours ago)
KameyuaKepekmi: @Mercurius I just got you. :p Go bed now. (2 hours ago)


Enrique Fiset: Je crois que j'ai rencontré notre ami Mercure. (I think I met our friend Mercury) About 1 hour ago


Attemping to observe Mercury at 5pm, I did not succeed.

I came back 1 hour later and I saw a point brighter than others.

I checked and it's Mercury.  :o  :D Sadly, I can't take a picture. :'(

@Mercury I've got you!

Also, I saw the ''square'' near the closest planet from the sun (Pegasus).
« Last Edit: February 16, 2013, 07:02:33 pm by Kameyu a Kepekmì »

Offline `Eylan Ayfalulukanä

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 4616
  • us United States
  • Karma: 44
  • Palulukan alu Kenya 06/23/1996 - 01/15/2017
    • The Lionlamb website
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #64 on: February 16, 2013, 08:02:26 pm »
You don't need a professional camera for this. ;)

You most certainly don't need a professional camera.  But one that allows you to set aperture and shutter speed definitely helps. What you do need is knowledge of the proper techniques needed to get good astrophotos, and practice using those techniques. What you showed in that last group of pictures are your best astrophotos yet.

I took some utterly spectacular pictures of the annular solar eclipse we had here last summer using a film SLR and Ektar 100 film (typically used for bright outdoor work and portraiture) I simply did some experimentation (with a digital camera) to determine when the exposure was in the ballpark. I then bracketed exposure on the sun (with a suitable filter), and let the latitude of modern films work its magic. The results were stunning, and unlike any other pictures I saw of that eclipse. (I really need to get those scanned in!)

The most important accessories you need are a tripod, and a remote shutter release. Neither one is expensive.

Yawey ngahu!
pamrel si ro [email protected]

Offline Vawmataw

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 5494
  • nv Eywa'eveng
  • Karma: 91
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #65 on: February 17, 2013, 09:22:25 am »
You don't need a professional camera for this. ;)

You most certainly don't need a professional camera.  But one that allows you to set aperture and shutter speed definitely helps. What you do need is knowledge of the proper techniques needed to get good astrophotos, and practice using those techniques. What you showed in that last group of pictures are your best astrophotos yet.

I took some utterly spectacular pictures of the annular solar eclipse we had here last summer using a film SLR and Ektar 100 film (typically used for bright outdoor work and portraiture) I simply did some experimentation (with a digital camera) to determine when the exposure was in the ballpark. I then bracketed exposure on the sun (with a suitable filter), and let the latitude of modern films work its magic. The results were stunning, and unlike any other pictures I saw of that eclipse. (I really need to get those scanned in!)

The most important accessories you need are a tripod, and a remote shutter release. Neither one is expensive.
:) ;)

I think the tripod is more necessary than a remote shutter release, but both are useful.

The tripod of my toy telescope can stabilize the camera, but I can't install the camera. Because I don't photography a lot and can photography well, I don't plan in a close future to buy a tripod.

Also, it's very amazing to photography an eclipse. I'd live near the equator to see solar eclipses (safely, of course).

I have already photographied a moon eclipse. Sadly, I lost the picture.

 
KameyuaKepekmi: @Mercurius @Ares I'll get you a day! (3 hours ago)
KameyuaKepekmi: @Mercurius I just got you. :p Go bed now. (2 hours ago)


Enrique Fiset: Je crois que j'ai rencontré notre ami Mercure. (I think I met our friend Mercury) About 1 hour ago


Attemping to observe Mercury at 5pm, I did not succeed.

I came back 1 hour later and I saw a point brighter than others.

I checked and it's Mercury.  :o  :D Sadly, I can't take a picture. :'(

@Mercury I've got you!

Also, I saw the ''square'' near the closest planet from the sun (Pegasus).

Mercury at its evening best for 2013

Mercury’s close proximity to the Sun usually makes the planet difficult to spot because our star’s glare washes out the point of light marking the innermost planet. In addition, Mercury never gets far enough from the Sun to appear high in a dark sky. But in mid-February at dusk, look about 18° east of the Sun to find this elusive planet. (The width of your fist held at arm’s length equals approximately 10°.) February 16 marks the best time in 2013 to see Mercury in the evening sky. On that day, it reaches greatest elongation, meaning the innermost planet attains its greatest angle away from the Sun as seen from Earth.

http://www.astronomy.com/en/News-Observing/News/2013/02/Mercury%20at%20its%20evening%20best%20for%202013.aspx

I have been lucky to see Mercury yesterday. :o :D
« Last Edit: February 17, 2013, 09:30:08 am by Kameyu a Kepekmì »

Offline Vawmataw

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 5494
  • nv Eywa'eveng
  • Karma: 91
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #66 on: February 18, 2013, 05:50:04 pm »
Just saw for the second time Mercury, and photographied it:


:D

Also, a wonderful duet Jupiter-Moon.
« Last Edit: February 19, 2013, 04:15:55 pm by Kameyu a Kepekmì »

Offline Vawmataw

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 5494
  • nv Eywa'eveng
  • Karma: 91
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #67 on: February 21, 2013, 06:12:19 pm »
Look above this post, please. :D There are new interesting posts! ;)


I made a meme about our weather this week:
« Last Edit: February 21, 2013, 06:27:49 pm by Kameyu a Kepekmì »

Offline `Eylan Ayfalulukanä

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 4616
  • us United States
  • Karma: 44
  • Palulukan alu Kenya 06/23/1996 - 01/15/2017
    • The Lionlamb website
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #68 on: February 22, 2013, 04:39:29 pm »
You are getting much better at keeping your camera steady!

You might be interested to know that I shot that picture of the moon and Mercury freehand. What I did was put the camera down on the parapet of the building roof I was shooting from, sideways and braced it there as best as I could. I also pressed the shutter release and held it down. My camera will take multiple exposures when I do that. But strangely enough, the best shot of each group was the often the first picture. Another useful technique is to squeeze the shutter release button, the same way you squeeze the trigger of a gun when trying to make an accurate shot.

And speaking of squeezing triggers, you can practice taking steady pictures by balancing a coin on the top of your camera. Thae pictures without disturbing the camera enough to make the coin fall off.

Yawey ngahu!
pamrel si ro [email protected]

Offline Vawmataw

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 5494
  • nv Eywa'eveng
  • Karma: 91
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #69 on: February 22, 2013, 04:47:22 pm »
You are getting much better at keeping your camera steady!
True.

You might be interested to know that I shot that picture of the moon and Mercury freehand. What I did was put the camera down on the parapet of the building roof I was shooting from, sideways and braced it there as best as I could. I also pressed the shutter release and held it down. My camera will take multiple exposures when I do that. But strangely enough, the best shot of each group was the often the first picture. Another useful technique is to squeeze the shutter release button, the same way you squeeze the trigger of a gun when trying to make an accurate shot.
WOW! :o
The moon and Mercury both in the same picture? OMG. I couldn't do it easily.

Congratulations.

Offline `Eylan Ayfalulukanä

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 4616
  • us United States
  • Karma: 44
  • Palulukan alu Kenya 06/23/1996 - 01/15/2017
    • The Lionlamb website
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #70 on: February 23, 2013, 08:48:07 pm »
Yes, the picture in this post on this thread

http://forum.learnnavi.org/science/astronomy-threadking-a-teri-tanhia-tiftia/msg575261/#msg575261

You might try your hand at taking a picture of a bright constellation, like Orion or Leo. Brace the camera as I described, and let the camera set the exposure (unless you have a manual exposure mode, which you should learn how to use).

And if you haven't done so, you might get a book on basic photography from the library. Understanding the relationship between aperture, shutter speed, ISO/ASA and depth of field is critical to getting the best pictures. These parameters matter if you are shooting film or digital, still or movie.

Yawey ngahu!
pamrel si ro [email protected]

Offline Vawmataw

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 5494
  • nv Eywa'eveng
  • Karma: 91
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #71 on: February 23, 2013, 09:20:37 pm »
Yes, the picture in this post on this thread

http://forum.learnnavi.org/science/astronomy-threadking-a-teri-tanhia-tiftia/msg575261/#msg575261
That's true. This duet is likewise beautiful like my latest duet Jupiter-Moon. :D

Also, it was the good time to photography Mercury. Even I observed it on the best day of the YEAR without knowing that! :o
Details here.
I'm repeating again. :-[

You might try your hand at taking a picture of a bright constellation, like Orion or Leo. Brace the camera as I described, and let the camera set the exposure (unless you have a manual exposure mode, which you should learn how to use).

And if you haven't done so, you might get a book on basic photography from the library. Understanding the relationship between aperture, shutter speed, ISO/ASA and depth of field is critical to getting the best pictures. These parameters matter if you are shooting film or digital, still or movie.
That's why I can get only pictures of stars of negative magnitude, maybe because I stay inside and also because of the methods I use for photography. :( However, I ain't time nor money for buying more equipment (it's not expensive, but...). :-\ I'm beginning astrophotography at almost 13 years old.

Your tips will may be very useful when I'll be older and an expert.  :D Maybe I'll get a book.

There's also nothing to photography this time and the weather is bad.


You maybe didn't see technical informations about my astropictures.

Well, did you know I do urban astronomy?

Offline `Eylan Ayfalulukanä

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 4616
  • us United States
  • Karma: 44
  • Palulukan alu Kenya 06/23/1996 - 01/15/2017
    • The Lionlamb website
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #72 on: February 24, 2013, 02:27:47 am »

You might try your hand at taking a picture of a bright constellation, like Orion or Leo. Brace the camera as I described, and let the camera set the exposure (unless you have a manual exposure mode, which you should learn how to use).

And if you haven't done so, you might get a book on basic photography from the library. Understanding the relationship between aperture, shutter speed, ISO/ASA and depth of field is critical to getting the best pictures. These parameters matter if you are shooting film or digital, still or movie.
That's why I can get only pictures of stars of negative magnitude, maybe because I stay inside and also because of the methods I use for photography. :( However, I ain't time nor money for buying more equipment (it's not expensive, but...). :-\ I'm beginning astrophotography at almost 13 years old.

Your tips will may be very useful when I'll be older and an expert.  :D Maybe I'll get a book.

Actually, the time to become an expert is now. You have two cameras to experiment with. Neither looks like it is anything special. Get the book I recommended, and take your cameras out and experiment with them. You would be surprised what you can do with an inexpensive camera. Especially if you can override tha automatic settings.

My dad gave me my first camera when I was about 8 years old. It was a box camera that shot 120 roll film (look that up on the internet!) It had 4 aperture settings an one fixed shutter speed. Although it wasn't complex, every shot had to be thought out. The first film I was given to use was black-and-white. besides being less expensive, it is harder to mess up on exposure with black and white film. With a digital camera of course, you can immediately see if you got your exposure right. But with film, you have to be more careful, as you can't immediately see what you have done.

When I had mastered that 120 camera (and I still have some prints I took with that camera), I graduated to a 126 cartridge film camera. That camera, a very old, but very nice Kodak camera, took great pictures. It had an automatic exposure control. Not sophisticated, but it did the job.

When I was about your age, I was given an Argus C3 (which I think I still have somewhere). This was my first 35 mm camera, and my first camera with both aperture and shutter speed controls. It had no light meter, so he gave me an old Norwood Director light meter(which I also still have). I took many, many rolls of film with that camera, well into adulthood. During that time, dad would also let me use his SLR camera (A Yashica TL Electro) until he head to sell it after the family business failed. In High School, I took photography-- twice! There, I dabbled in darkroom work, as well. If your school has a photography course you can take, I would highly recommend it.

One year sometime in the early '90's, I got a little Kodak Cameo point-and-shoot 35 mm camera for Christmas (from my Dad). (I was living in 'Kodak Town', Rochester, NY at the time!) That was like going back to basics. It took good pictures, under a lot of different conditions, but nothing was adjustable on it. I was back to about where you are now.

In 1997, I took that little Kodak Cameo camera to Chicago, Il. to photograph the infamous Tsavo Maneaters (of 'Ghost and Darkness' fame) at the Field Museum of Natural History. When I got to Chicago, I could not find the camera! Having driven 9 hours to get there, I was not going to just give up. I went to a store and bought a Pentax point-and-shoot 35 mm camrea, but one that was more sophisticated than the Cameo. It cost me $135 of emergency travel funds, but was one of the best $135 I ever spent on photography. That camera did an exceptional job photographing the very challenging Tasvo maneaters exhibit, some of the pictures of which can be seen at http://www.lionlamb.us/gandd.html I have a hard time taking pictures any better than that little camera did, even with a $3,600 DSLR! I still occasionally throw some batteries and a roll of film in that camera, and take pictures with it.

In late 1998, I bought a nice film SLR (Canon Rebel G) with a pair of the most useful lenses, to take with me on a safari to East Africa. That camera was the most expensive investment I had ever made into photography, and marked the end of the point and shoot era for me. But by that time I had learned all the important skills a photographer needed to know, without owning or using sophisticated equipment. I still have that SLR, and put several rolls of film a year through it.

I would have never seriously considered digital photography until one day when I won a really nice DSLR (A Canon Digital Rebel XT) in a drawing (2005). the folks I won it from even included a really good lens with it, one much better than the 'kit' lens usually included with these cameras. I used that camera very heavily, and nearly wore it out, until I replaced it last year with a much more modern DSLR. But even that camera will have an 'afterlife' as a camera for astrophotography. I am going to have it modified to have a wider bandwidth IR cut filter. Then, used with a T mount on my telescope, I can take astrophotos.

The bottom line here is you don't have to have expensive cameras or schooling, etc. to be a good photographer. Of course, some book learning helps, but the most important thing to do is take pictures and experiment.

Quote from: Kameyu a Kepekmì

There's also nothing to photography this time and the weather is bad.

Try some indoor pictures, preferably without flash. See what you can do!

Quote from: Kameyu a Kepekmì
Well, did you know I do urban astronomy?

I kind of figured that out. You might want to look up a person named John Dobson and the telescope he invented. His goal was urban 'sidewalk' astronomy. He put a conventional Newtonian telescope on a kind of lazy susan type platform, and made the 'scope from simple materials, like Sonotube. This kind of telescope is called a 'Dobsonian', and is one of the most popular types of 'scope today, as you can get big aperture for not a lot of money. For instance, my 8 inch LX200 Schmidt-Cassegrain 'scope originally sold for about $2,200 (I bought it used for much less than that!). For that same money, you can get a 16 inch Dobsonian that gathers at least four times the light as my 8 inch, and even has digital setting circles. The little Starblast telescope I recommended to you a number of posts back is a kind of Dobsonian mount. There are some very serious amateur astronomy 'scopes built on the Dobsonian mount. Our club has a 20 inch and a 24 inch Dobsonian 'scope. And I might see something 30+ inches this summer at the Golden State Star Party.

Keep an eye out for telescopes, etc. at garage sales, etc. Some people buy telescopes, and then find out that astronomy is not for them. You can often pick them up for very little money. Even if they don't have a sophisticated computerized mount, they will still teach you to learn the sky. Knowing the sky is probably more important than anything else you can do at this time. Even though I have a computerized 'scope, I am now taking the time to learn how to find favorite deep sky objects without a computer. This would not be posible if hadn't learned at least the brighter constellations.

So, there is much you can do in photography and astronomy without having to have expensive equipment. And you are the perfect age to learn!

Yawey ngahu!
pamrel si ro [email protected]

Offline Vawmataw

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 5494
  • nv Eywa'eveng
  • Karma: 91
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #73 on: February 25, 2013, 05:47:02 pm »
Actually, the time to become an expert is now. You have two cameras to experiment with.
One. The other has a major problem.

Tse, also the camera quality can change the picture quality (with my own camera [the one which has a major problem], I shake a little bit of zoom too much and the picture is not clear). I'll try soon the improve my astropictures with the other.

Also, I decided to buy binoculars. They are less expensive and they will make me happy to watch the stars. I'll start with binoculars a little bit of good quality not for astronomy. :)

Offline `Eylan Ayfalulukanä

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 4616
  • us United States
  • Karma: 44
  • Palulukan alu Kenya 06/23/1996 - 01/15/2017
    • The Lionlamb website
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #74 on: February 26, 2013, 03:13:17 am »

Tse, also the camera quality can change the picture quality (with my own camera [the one which has a major problem], I shake a little bit of zoom too much and the picture is not clear). I'll try soon the improve my astropictures with the other.

That is why you need a tripod!
Which camera is broken, and what is wrong with it?

Quote from: Kameyu a Kepekmì
Also, I decided to buy binoculars. They are less expensive and they will make me happy to watch the stars. I'll start with binoculars a little bit of good quality not for astronomy. :)

Getting a pair of binoculars is an excellent decision, and is something we recommend to all beginning astronomers.  7 X 35 and 10 X 50 are two common sizes. 7 X 35 will produce wider views with less image shake, but 10 X 50's will let you see fainter objects. My personal binoculars (which are lost right now :( ) are Celestron 10 X 50's. I purchased these both for animal watching while on safari, and for astronomy. (I had a lot of astronomy fun on that safari, as well, including seeing the Large Magellenic Cloud! I introduced my guide to astronomy, and left my sky atlas with him.) Get the best binoculars you can afford. They will reward you for years to come!

Yawey ngahu!
pamrel si ro [email protected]

Offline Vawmataw

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 5494
  • nv Eywa'eveng
  • Karma: 91
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #75 on: February 26, 2013, 04:47:58 pm »

Tse, also the camera quality can change the picture quality (with my own camera [the one which has a major problem], I shake a little bit of zoom too much and the picture is not clear). I'll try soon the improve my astropictures with the other.

That is why you need a tripod!
Which camera is broken, and what is wrong with it?
I have my mother's camera and my camera. Mine is broken: I put new batteries, but when I turn on the camera, it turns off almost 30 seconds after. :(

Getting a pair of binoculars is an excellent decision, and is something we recommend to all beginning astronomers.  7 X 35 and 10 X 50 are two common sizes. 7 X 35 will produce wider views with less image shake, but 10 X 50's will let you see fainter objects. My personal binoculars (which are lost right now :( ) are Celestron 10 X 50's. I purchased these both for animal watching while on safari, and for astronomy. (I had a lot of astronomy fun on that safari, as well, including seeing the Large Magellenic Cloud! I introduced my guide to astronomy, and left my sky atlas with him.) Get the best binoculars you can afford. They will reward you for years to come!
There is a shop selling astronomy stuff in my city. They also sell not astronomical binoculars. My budget is $50-$60, and it will be good Celestron. I found out Outland X 8x25 and 10X25, the first one costing $54.95 and the second one $59.95. There is also the UPCLOSE 8X21 costing $19.95. Like you say, they will be useful both for astronomy and for safari.

Offline Vawmataw

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 5494
  • nv Eywa'eveng
  • Karma: 91
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #76 on: March 06, 2013, 03:54:17 pm »
I made some astronomy yesterday night.

http://kameyu-astronomy.wikia.com/wiki/March_5th,_2013

Offline Tsanten Eywa 'eveng

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • Posts: 3875
  • no Norway
  • Karma: 23
  • Tsanten Eywa 'eveng
    • Oe new slivu taronyu - Ngay Tìrey Na'vì Tskaha - pìlok Tsantenä Eywa 'eveng
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #77 on: March 09, 2013, 10:21:34 am »
When is International Space Station visible in your sky today?
ISS is now currently above the southern Pacific Ocean, and is soon approaching Peru's coast in Southern American in about 15 minutes or so. It will fly right above Peru's capital Lima. ISS will reach the northern coast to Southern America, 7 minutes or so after that. 17:40 CET, it will reach Europe. It will fly right above London, and so over Brussels, and over Berlin, Warsaw, and then over to Russia. 15 minutes after Europe, it will approach India, and will cruise right over the night sky across India, till it reaches Jakarta's coast in Indonesia, and then over to southwestern part of Australia.

It will reach again Central Europe around 7 pm CET
Around 2 pm EST it will reach east coast of USA.
Reaches southern Europe 8:50 pm CET.
Reaches western part of USA 2 pm MST(Mountain Standard Time)
Reaches Spain 10:30 pm CET.

« Last Edit: March 09, 2013, 10:30:53 am by Tsanten Eywa 'eveng »

Offline Vawmataw

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 5494
  • nv Eywa'eveng
  • Karma: 91
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #78 on: March 09, 2013, 10:36:59 am »
When is International Space Station visible in your sky today?
If I see what you wrote, I will never see it. (it passes in the afternoon in USA) :(

Offline Tsanten Eywa 'eveng

  • Palulukan Makto
  • *****
  • Posts: 3875
  • no Norway
  • Karma: 23
  • Tsanten Eywa 'eveng
    • Oe new slivu taronyu - Ngay Tìrey Na'vì Tskaha - pìlok Tsantenä Eywa 'eveng
Re: Astronomy thread/Kìng a teri tanhìä tìftia
« Reply #79 on: March 09, 2013, 10:58:55 am »
When is International Space Station visible in your sky today?
If I see what you wrote, I will never see it. (it passes in the afternoon in USA) :(

ISS will pass over northeastern Canada 5:55 pm, it's when it is nightsky, and then again 7:30 pm over northeastern Canada, or actually across southern Canada. Same again 9:05 pm.

 

Become LearnNavi's friend on Facebook Follow LearnNavi on Twitter! Watch LearnNavi's videos on YouTube

SMF 2.0.14 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines | XHTML | RSS | WAP2 | Site Rules

LearnNavi is not affiliated with the official Avatar website,
James Cameron, or the Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation.
All trademarks and servicemarks are the properties of their respective owners.
Images in the LearnNavi.org Forums and Gallery may not be used without permission.

LearnNavi Affiliates:
ToS

LearnNavi is the community to learn Na'vi, the Avatar Language
"A place where real friendships are made." -Paul Frommer

AvatarMeet | Learn Na'vi Forum | Learn Na'vi Wiki | Na'viteri

LearnNavi