Learn Na'vi > Syntax / Grammar

Na'vi Linguistics: Free Word Order

<< < (2/8) > >>

Kì’onga Vul:
Annis mentioned that the manipulation of word order can do some of the job that intonation might in more restricted-order languages.  I'm familiar with Finnish, which has relatively free constituent order, and also has fairly predictable inflection: over the course of a sentence, pitch gets lower (even in questions) and rises slightly for constituents.  Were you to greatly violate this, by rising in intonation for a question perhaps, it would sound very strange or even incorrect.


Because of freer word order, is Na'vi similarly restricted as far as intonation?  Or is this something that's less a rule and more an unconscious decision by the speaking community?

Tirea Aean:

--- Quote from: Kì’onga Vul on December 23, 2010, 12:17:55 am ---Annis mentioned that the manipulation of word order can do some of the job that intonation might in more restricted-order languages.  I'm familiar with Finnish, which has relatively free constituent order, and also has fairly predictable inflection: over the course of a sentence, pitch gets lower (even in questions) and rises slightly for constituents.  Were you to greatly violate this, by rising in intonation for a question perhaps, it would sound very strange or even incorrect.


Because of freer word order, is Na'vi similarly restricted as far as intonation?  Or is this something that's less a rule and more an unconscious decision by the speaking community?

--- End quote ---

sorry this is crazy late.

we have little to no information on intonation as far as i know. if i understand correctly, intonation really is not a big deal. tho if you listen to all pawl's stuff, it seems to very much mimic english in that respect. its not like chinese at all where the intonation completely and utterly changes the entire meaning of what you're saying. the "why is this night" stuff is a bunch of questions but isnt like a conversation, its more like a literary work being read. every time i hear him say ngaru lu fpom srak it seems to go low and the fpom srak rises considerably. like english. there is english influence everywhere in Na'vi. probably because Paul is a native speaker of English. tho he is making efforts to try to lean less on English.

'Oma Tirea:
See also this thread.

Tirea Aean:

--- Quote from: Sxkxawng alu 'Oma Tirea on January 02, 2011, 08:26:50 pm ---See also this thread.



--- End quote ---

i THOUGHT i felt like I was repeating myself.... thanks for that. ;D

Kì’onga Vul:
Actually, I posted here before Sxkxawng made the Prosody thread. :P

But thanks for the responses.  Lucky me, I guess, that I don't have to worry much about rhythm, which I think is the most elusive part of a foreign language.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version