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Offline Tsanten Eywa 'eveng

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climate of Norway and other places
« on: June 21, 2012, 07:36:09 am »
Climate:
The southern and western parts of Norway experience more precipitation and have milder winters than the southeastern part. The lowlands around Oslo have the warmest and sunniest summers but also cold weather and snow in wintertime (especially inland).

Because of Norway's high latitude, there are large seasonal variations in daylight. From late May to late July, the sun never completely descends beneath the horizon in areas north of the Arctic Circle (hence Norway's description as the "Land of the Midnight Sun"), and the rest of the country experiences up to 20 hours of daylight per day. Conversely, from late November to late January, the sun never rises above the horizon in the north, and daylight hours are very short in the rest of the country.


Biodiversity:
The total number of species include 16,000 species of insects (probably 4,000 more species yet to be described), 20,000 species of algae, 1,800 species of lichen, 1,050 species of mosses, 2,800 species of vascular plants, up to 7,000 species of fungi, 450 species of birds (250 species nesting in Norway), 90 species of mammals, 45 fresh-water species of fish, 150 salt-water species of fish, 1,000 species of fresh-water invertebrates and 3,500 species of salt-water invertebrates.
About 40,000 of these species have been described by science. The red list of 2010 encompasses 4,599 species.

Seventeen species are listed mainly because they are endangered on a global scale, such as the European beaver, even if the population in Norway is not seen as endangered. The number of threatened and near-threatened species equals to 3,682; it includes 418 fungi species, many of which are closely associated with the small remaining areas of old-growth forests, 36 bird species, and 16 species of mammals. As of 2010, 2,398 species were listed as endangered or vulnerable; of these are 1250 listed as vulnerable (VU), 871 as endangered (EN), and 276 species as critically endangered (CR), among these are the gray wolf, the Arctic fox (healthy population on Svalbard) and the pool frog.
The largest predator in Norwegian waters is the sperm whale, and the largest fish is the basking shark. The largest predator on land is the polar bear, while the brown bear is the largest predator on the Norwegian mainland, where the common moose (also known as the "European Elk") is the largest animal.


Environment:
Stunning and dramatic scenery and landscape is found throughout Norway. The west coast of southern Norway and the coast of northern Norway present some of the most visually impressive coastal sceneries in the world. National Geographic has listed the Norwegian fjords as the world's top tourist attraction. The 2012 Environmental Performance Index put Norway in third place, based on the environmental performance of the country's policies.



Here is the climate of western Norway, who has the best temperature, including the warmest temperature in winter period



Climate of Western Norway:
Western Norway is one of the wettest regions in Europe, with precipitation in the mountains near the coast of about 3,500 mm per year on average, and exceeding 5,000 mm in peak years. In Bergen city the average precipitation is 2,250 mm per year. The wet climate is partly due to the Gulf Stream, which also gives this region a milder winter than other parts of Norway, with rain being more common than snow in the winter.

Summer:
Late June to early August is when summer is at its peak. This is when the weather is at its most stable and warmest with sunny, long and bright days. It is not unusual with temperatures reaching 25 °C (77 °F) and above.

Autumn:
During the course of September the landscape is painted in golden colours. Red clusters of rowan berries hang on naked branches. Autumn also means harvest time along the fjords.

Winter:
Wintertime, usually from November, turns the mountain areas of Western Norway into a skier's paradise. Gales, rain and cloud are likely along the west coast, particularly in winter, and the rainfall is frequent and heavy. Thanks to the warming Gulf Stream, the Norwegian fjords enjoy a relatively mild climate and remain virtually ice-free even during the winter.

Spring:
During springtime the most amazing colours burst forth to honour the warmth of the rising sun. Orchards of flowering fruit trees along the Hardangerfjord in May are images of paradise.

pictures:
Code: [Select]
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fb/V%C3%B8ringfossen.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a7/View_of_the_Aurlandsfjord%2C_Aurlandsvangen_and_Flam_from_below_the_Prest_Summit.jpg


National parks in Western Norway:


Folgefonna National Park:
Location: Hordaland, Norway
Coordinates: 60°5′N 6°24′E
Area: 545.2 km2 (210.5 sq mi)
Code: [Select]
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e9/Lake_Bondhus_Norway_2862.jpg
« Last Edit: July 02, 2012, 09:48:21 am by Tsanten Eywa 'eveng »

Offline Tsmuktengan

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Re: climate of Norway and more
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2012, 10:43:36 am »
All this will be added soon. Thank you, these places look amazing. But do you think the authorities would be pleased to have a group like us settling there? (implicitly, can you also have a look for legal possibilities/isues foer when it comes to settling in a natural area and having a more basic way of living?)


Offline Tsanten Eywa 'eveng

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Re: climate of Norway and more
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2012, 12:17:22 pm »
Do you mean about citizenship?


Who can apply for citizehship?
If you hold a valid residence permit in Norway, you can apply for Norwegian citizenship. In order for your application to be granted, you must, among other things:
http://www.udi.no/Norwegian-Directorate-of-Immigration/Central-topics/Citizenship-/Requirements-to-obtain-Norwegian-citizenship-by-application/

  • be older than 12 years of age
  • have documented or clarified your identity. As a rule, you must have a valid passport when we decide your application.
  • be resident in Norway and intend to continue to live here
  • meet the conditions for a permanent residence permit
  • have stayed in Norway for a total of seven years during the past ten years on permits, each of which must have been granted for at least one year
  • have completed 300 hours of tuition in the Norwegian language or have documented sufficient skills in Norwegian or Sami (Note: applies to applications submitted after 1 September 2008 and to persons between the ages of 18 and 55)
  • have been released from your original citizenship (unless it automatically expires when you become Norwegian)

Remember that you must hold a valid permit while your citizenship application is being processed. A permit is not valid simply because you have applied for citizenship. You must therefore apply for renewal of your permit at least one month before it expires.

Citizenship for children: http://www.udi.no/Norwegian-Directorate-of-Immigration/Central-topics/Citizenship-/Citizenship-for-children/

How to apply citizenship: http://www.udi.no/Norwegian-Directorate-of-Immigration/Central-topics/Citizenship-/How-do-I-apply-for-Norwegian-citizenship/

Citizenship for nordic citizens: http://www.udi.no/Norwegian-Directorate-of-Immigration/Central-topics/Citizenship-/Norwegian-citizenship-for-Nordic-citizens/


If you wanna visit Norway, you need a visa: http://www.udi.no/Norwegian-Directorate-of-Immigration/Central-topics/Visa/


Permament residence permit:
A permanent residence permit entitles the holder to live and work in Norway indefinitely.

Here you can apply for permanent residence permit: http://www.udi.no/Norwegian-Directorate-of-Immigration/Central-topics/Permanent-Residence-Permit/How-do-I-apply-for-a-settlement-permit/



This is a notification if someone is from China:

I have heard that chinese people who are visiting Norway, are now been advised for not visiting Norway, people who are travelling from China to Norway can't visit Norway, says the gouvernment in China

This has something about the Nobel Peace Prize in 2010, when Norway gave it to Liu Xiabo


This is the news about it:
« Last Edit: June 21, 2012, 12:29:49 pm by Tsanten Eywa 'eveng »

Offline Tsmuktengan

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Re: climate of Norway and more
« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2012, 08:34:57 pm »
Thank you for this, but this is not exactly what I meant.

I meant to ask you what are the rules for people who want to settle in natural places or in forests. Is this legal or not? Must they buy land? Should there be an authorization asked by a local administration? I don't think it is allowed to just unpack our stuff and start building up like this, especially if it is a national park.

I mean, camping would be all right, but RLNT is far more than just camping and it is about creating a permanent camp in fact for a group of people. This certainly requires legal permissions unrelated to citizenship. Do you see what I mean?


Offline Tsanten Eywa 'eveng

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Re: climate of Norway and more
« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2012, 08:33:26 am »
Thank you for this, but this is not exactly what I meant.

I meant to ask you what are the rules for people who want to settle in natural places or in forests. Is this legal or not? Must they buy land? Should there be an authorization asked by a local administration? I don't think it is allowed to just unpack our stuff and start building up like this, especially if it is a national park.

I mean, camping would be all right, but RLNT is far more than just camping and it is about creating a permanent camp in fact for a group of people. This certainly requires legal permissions unrelated to citizenship. Do you see what I mean?

Sorry, I can't find something about that :(

I don't know where I am going to look

But, that last I posted about "permament residence permit", isn't it that what you meant?

Offline Tsmuktengan

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Re: climate of Norway and more
« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2012, 09:01:01 am »
Well, you should be able to ask somewhere or to some kind of people familiar with natural areas what is required to live in natural space outside villages or cities.

If you think modern societies will let you go tribal like this, you may get it wrong. There must be an administrative status to all this. And this is a heck to find, as you say, because we aren't law experts and there is of course no documentation.

In France, a group of people are building a castle only using the same tools and techniques than in the XIIIth century; they had to have administrative permissions and cope with some safety laws. And yet they don't live there.


Offline Nìmwey

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Re: climate of Norway and more
« Reply #6 on: June 22, 2012, 03:58:10 pm »
http://directory.ic.org/intentional_communities_Norway
Here are a few intentional communities in Norway, perhaps they know something.
I have never been to Norway (unfortunately, you have wonderful nature and a cute language ;D) but, just speaking from the scandinavian POV, it is FRIGGIN' COLD UP HERE. :P

Offline Tsmuktengan

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Re: climate of Norway and more
« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2012, 07:20:57 pm »
I already said it, but I share that fact : it is cold up there, even at the southern spots. ;D


Offline Tsanten Eywa 'eveng

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Re: climate of Norway and more
« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2012, 09:00:13 am »
You can take Norway out of the list, this is what happened last winter, when almost the entire Europe was covered in snow

so Norway, and the whole Europe is a bad region where we can set our tribe down :(


Offline Tsmuktengan

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Re: climate of Norway and more
« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2012, 09:13:12 am »
oops...mmkay. So we can still have a look to other territories where there is a more comfortable climate and yet a stable and developed state (US, French Guiana, Australia?.... possibly Chile?).


Offline Tsanten Eywa 'eveng

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Re: climate of Norway and more
« Reply #10 on: July 01, 2012, 11:05:25 am »
oops...mmkay. So we can still have a look to other territories where there is a more comfortable climate and yet a stable and developed state (US, French Guiana, Australia?.... possibly Chile?).

yes 8)

Better these areas
And as we know, keep us away from Brazil

But what about the other Pacific areas, like Papua, Indonesia or the surrounding islands there?
I bet they have a very good climate

You have heard about the Korowai tribe, for an example?
The "tree-living" people? they are living in New Guinea

« Last Edit: July 01, 2012, 11:08:50 am by Tsanten Eywa 'eveng »

Offline Nìmwey

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Re: climate of Norway and more
« Reply #11 on: July 02, 2012, 08:41:38 am »
I think we need to start a new thread, setting down what we want. ;)
It's impossible to know what location is truly suitable when we don't even know exactly what we want.

Offline Tsanten Eywa 'eveng

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Re: climate of Norway and other places
« Reply #12 on: July 02, 2012, 10:04:09 am »
Is Tasmania in Australia considered as a good location? Well this is what the climate is


As we all now, Australia is on the opposite side, so May-August is the coldest period



Tasmania:

Capital: Hobart
Area:   Total: 90,758 sq km(35,042 sq mi)
           Land: 68,401 sq km(26,410 sq mi)
           Water: 22,357 sq km(8,632 sq mi)
Population: 495,354
Elevation: Mount Ossa: +1.61 km(5,295 ft)

Tasmania has a cool temperate climate with four distinct seasons. Summer lasts from December to February when the average maximum sea temperature is 21 °C (70 °F) and inland areas around Launceston reach 24 °C (75 °F). Other inland areas are much cooler with Liawenee, located on the Central Plateau, one of the coldest places in Australia with temperatures in February ranging between 4 °C (39 °F) to 17 °C (63 °F). Autumn lasts between March and May and experiences changeable weather, where summer weather patterns gradually take on the shape of winter patterns.

The winter months are between June and July and are generally the wettest and coolest months in the state, with most high lying areas receiving considerable snowfall. Winter maximums are 12 °C (54 °F) on average along coastal areas and 3 °C (37 °F) on the central plateau, thanks to a series of cold fronts from the Southern Ocean.[2] Spring is a season of transition, where winter weather patterns begin to take the shape of summer patterns, although snowfall is still common up until October. Spring is generally the windiest time of the year with afternoon sea breezes starting to take effect on the coast.
Rainfall in Tasmania follows a complicated pattern rather analogous to that found on large continents at the same latitude in the northern hemisphere. On the western side rainfall increases from around 1,458 millimetres (57.4 in) at Strahan on the coast up to 2,690 millimetres (106 in) at Cradle Valley in the highlands.

There is a strong winter maximum in rainfall: January and February typically averages between 30-40% the rainfall of July and August, though even in the driest months rain usually falls on every second day and the number of rainy days per year is much greater than on any part of the Australian mainland. Further east in the Lake Country, annual rainfall declines to around 900 millimetres (35 in), whilst in the Midlands, annual rainfall is as low as 450 millimetres (18 in) at Ross and generally below 600 millimetres (24 in). The eastern part of Tasmania has more evenly distributed rainfall than in the west, and most months receive very similar averages.

The densely populated northern coast is much drier than the western side, with annual rainfall ranging from 666 millimetres (26.2 in) in Launceston to 955 millimetres (37.6 in) in Burnie in the north west and 993 millimetres (39.1 in) in Scottsdale located further to the east.

Most rain falls in winter, and in summer the average can be as low as 31 millimetres (1.2 in) per month in Launceston. The east coast is wetter than the Midlands, with an average annual rainfall ranging from 775 millimetres (30.5 in) in St. Helens to around 640 millimetres (25 in) in Swansea.

Here the rainfall is evenly distributed over the year but can be very erratic as heavy rainfalls from the warm Tasman Sea are quite frequent. Whereas a three-day fall of 125 millimetres (4.9 in) occurs only once every fifty years on the north coast, it occurs on average once every four or five years around Swansea and Bicheno, and on 7–8 June 1954, there were many falls as large as 230 millimetres (9.1 in) in two days in that area. The east coast is sometimes called the "sun coast" because of its sunny climate.

Several sections of inland Tasmania, together with Flinders Island, were declared drought-affected areas by the state government in 2007.
The highest recorded maximum temperature in Tasmania was 42.2 °C (108.0 °F) at Scamander on 30 January 2009, during the 2009 southeastern Australia heat wave. Tasmania's lowest recorded minimum temperature was −13 °C (8.6 °F) on 30 June 1983, at Butlers Gorge, Shannon, and Tarraleah.

Offline Tsmuktengan

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Re: climate of Norway and more
« Reply #13 on: July 03, 2012, 02:32:08 pm »
I think we need to start a new thread, setting down what we want. ;)
It's impossible to know what location is truly suitable when we don't even know exactly what we want.

It has already been done, look in the forums.  ;)


Offline Nìmwey

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Re: climate of Norway and other places
« Reply #14 on: July 04, 2012, 05:45:39 am »
If you mean my thread, I posted it just after I wrote that post. :P

Offline Tsanten Eywa 'eveng

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Re: climate of Norway and other places
« Reply #15 on: August 01, 2012, 03:21:10 pm »
We not have only very cold weather, sometimes, it can get extremely hot, that happened last year

This area, is not very far away from where I live, just around 100 km away from me
Saltdal, in Nordland County,Norway is one of the driest areas in the entire Norway

In five years, from 2001 to 2005, it was measured only 74 mm precipitation

Last year, it was heatwave here in Norway, the highest recorded temperature was 92.8F(33.8°C), it was on 11th of june
In the autumn of 2011, was also a recorded temperature here in Nordland County. The highest temperature, in October 2011, was at 20°C(68F)
That was pretty unnormal temperature. It was almost the same back in the autumn of 2010. in 2010, it was 17°C(62.6F), in October 2010.

But this year, here in the entire Norway, is the climate very unstable, because of the jet stream. The jet stream have caused the low pressures to change it course, now is it going right over Germany, making northern Europe to have colder climate than normally. We experience the same here
Now, in 1st of august here in Bodø, it is currently now 14°C. it is gonna get much colder longer this week. the lowest at maybe 7°C(44.6F) and highest at 10°C(50F)

I really worry of how the winter will be this year. If the jet stream doesn't move back to normal, we will have an extremely cold winter, in the entire northern Europe


This is something you can also add at the website
As I see, you haven't added nothing

Offline Tsmuktengan

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Re: climate of Norway and other places
« Reply #16 on: August 12, 2012, 12:46:57 pm »
I had no computer and no tablet for the past weeks. I am seriously considering offering you people writing access on the website because only me working on it makes updates happen far too slowly. I can both write updates and give you accounts in about one week when I'll be back to Paris. Because se there is a lot to say for Norway.


Offline Tsanten Eywa 'eveng

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Re: climate of Norway and other places
« Reply #17 on: February 09, 2013, 03:11:51 pm »
This shows how Norway is, my beautiful homeland. The summer climate, is stunning.











« Last Edit: February 09, 2013, 03:24:23 pm by Tsanten Eywa 'eveng »

 

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