Tribe (This forum is retired. All topics are read-only.) > Location Discussion

climate of Norway and other places

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Tsanten Eywa 'eveng:
Climate:
The southern and western parts of Norway experience more precipitation and have milder winters than the southeastern part. The lowlands around Oslo have the warmest and sunniest summers but also cold weather and snow in wintertime (especially inland).

Because of Norway's high latitude, there are large seasonal variations in daylight. From late May to late July, the sun never completely descends beneath the horizon in areas north of the Arctic Circle (hence Norway's description as the "Land of the Midnight Sun"), and the rest of the country experiences up to 20 hours of daylight per day. Conversely, from late November to late January, the sun never rises above the horizon in the north, and daylight hours are very short in the rest of the country.


Biodiversity:
The total number of species include 16,000 species of insects (probably 4,000 more species yet to be described), 20,000 species of algae, 1,800 species of lichen, 1,050 species of mosses, 2,800 species of vascular plants, up to 7,000 species of fungi, 450 species of birds (250 species nesting in Norway), 90 species of mammals, 45 fresh-water species of fish, 150 salt-water species of fish, 1,000 species of fresh-water invertebrates and 3,500 species of salt-water invertebrates.
About 40,000 of these species have been described by science. The red list of 2010 encompasses 4,599 species.

Seventeen species are listed mainly because they are endangered on a global scale, such as the European beaver, even if the population in Norway is not seen as endangered. The number of threatened and near-threatened species equals to 3,682; it includes 418 fungi species, many of which are closely associated with the small remaining areas of old-growth forests, 36 bird species, and 16 species of mammals. As of 2010, 2,398 species were listed as endangered or vulnerable; of these are 1250 listed as vulnerable (VU), 871 as endangered (EN), and 276 species as critically endangered (CR), among these are the gray wolf, the Arctic fox (healthy population on Svalbard) and the pool frog.
The largest predator in Norwegian waters is the sperm whale, and the largest fish is the basking shark. The largest predator on land is the polar bear, while the brown bear is the largest predator on the Norwegian mainland, where the common moose (also known as the "European Elk") is the largest animal.


Environment:
Stunning and dramatic scenery and landscape is found throughout Norway. The west coast of southern Norway and the coast of northern Norway present some of the most visually impressive coastal sceneries in the world. National Geographic has listed the Norwegian fjords as the world's top tourist attraction. The 2012 Environmental Performance Index put Norway in third place, based on the environmental performance of the country's policies.



Here is the climate of western Norway, who has the best temperature, including the warmest temperature in winter period



Climate of Western Norway:
Western Norway is one of the wettest regions in Europe, with precipitation in the mountains near the coast of about 3,500 mm per year on average, and exceeding 5,000 mm in peak years. In Bergen city the average precipitation is 2,250 mm per year. The wet climate is partly due to the Gulf Stream, which also gives this region a milder winter than other parts of Norway, with rain being more common than snow in the winter.

Summer:
Late June to early August is when summer is at its peak. This is when the weather is at its most stable and warmest with sunny, long and bright days. It is not unusual with temperatures reaching 25 °C (77 °F) and above.

Autumn:
During the course of September the landscape is painted in golden colours. Red clusters of rowan berries hang on naked branches. Autumn also means harvest time along the fjords.

Winter:
Wintertime, usually from November, turns the mountain areas of Western Norway into a skier's paradise. Gales, rain and cloud are likely along the west coast, particularly in winter, and the rainfall is frequent and heavy. Thanks to the warming Gulf Stream, the Norwegian fjords enjoy a relatively mild climate and remain virtually ice-free even during the winter.

Spring:
During springtime the most amazing colours burst forth to honour the warmth of the rising sun. Orchards of flowering fruit trees along the Hardangerfjord in May are images of paradise.

pictures:

--- Code: ---http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fb/V%C3%B8ringfossen.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a7/View_of_the_Aurlandsfjord%2C_Aurlandsvangen_and_Flam_from_below_the_Prest_Summit.jpg

--- End code ---


National parks in Western Norway:


Folgefonna National Park:
Location: Hordaland, Norway
Coordinates: 60°5′N 6°24′E
Area: 545.2 km2 (210.5 sq mi)

--- Code: ---http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e9/Lake_Bondhus_Norway_2862.jpg
--- End code ---

Tsmuktengan:
All this will be added soon. Thank you, these places look amazing. But do you think the authorities would be pleased to have a group like us settling there? (implicitly, can you also have a look for legal possibilities/isues foer when it comes to settling in a natural area and having a more basic way of living?)

Tsanten Eywa 'eveng:
Do you mean about citizenship?


Who can apply for citizehship?
If you hold a valid residence permit in Norway, you can apply for Norwegian citizenship. In order for your application to be granted, you must, among other things:
http://www.udi.no/Norwegian-Directorate-of-Immigration/Central-topics/Citizenship-/Requirements-to-obtain-Norwegian-citizenship-by-application/


* be older than 12 years of age
* have documented or clarified your identity. As a rule, you must have a valid passport when we decide your application.
* be resident in Norway and intend to continue to live here
* meet the conditions for a permanent residence permit
* have stayed in Norway for a total of seven years during the past ten years on permits, each of which must have been granted for at least one year
* have completed 300 hours of tuition in the Norwegian language or have documented sufficient skills in Norwegian or Sami (Note: applies to applications submitted after 1 September 2008 and to persons between the ages of 18 and 55)
* have been released from your original citizenship (unless it automatically expires when you become Norwegian)
Remember that you must hold a valid permit while your citizenship application is being processed. A permit is not valid simply because you have applied for citizenship. You must therefore apply for renewal of your permit at least one month before it expires.

Citizenship for children: http://www.udi.no/Norwegian-Directorate-of-Immigration/Central-topics/Citizenship-/Citizenship-for-children/

How to apply citizenship: http://www.udi.no/Norwegian-Directorate-of-Immigration/Central-topics/Citizenship-/How-do-I-apply-for-Norwegian-citizenship/

Citizenship for nordic citizens: http://www.udi.no/Norwegian-Directorate-of-Immigration/Central-topics/Citizenship-/Norwegian-citizenship-for-Nordic-citizens/


If you wanna visit Norway, you need a visa: http://www.udi.no/Norwegian-Directorate-of-Immigration/Central-topics/Visa/


Permament residence permit:
A permanent residence permit entitles the holder to live and work in Norway indefinitely.

Here you can apply for permanent residence permit: http://www.udi.no/Norwegian-Directorate-of-Immigration/Central-topics/Permanent-Residence-Permit/How-do-I-apply-for-a-settlement-permit/



This is a notification if someone is from China:

I have heard that chinese people who are visiting Norway, are now been advised for not visiting Norway, people who are travelling from China to Norway can't visit Norway, says the gouvernment in China

This has something about the Nobel Peace Prize in 2010, when Norway gave it to Liu Xiabo


This is the news about it:
SpoilerLast year, nearly 30,000 Chinese traveled to Norway as tourists, an increase of 10,000 from the previous year, according to figures from the Foreign Ministry.

This year, however, it may be a decrease in the number of Chinese tourists visiting Norway. A new and sensational travel have been issued in China - Chinese tourists are advised not to travel to Norway, according to the travel industry in the Chinese province of Jiangsu.

- We have received feedback from Chinese tour operators that they have been told by the provincial authorities in several provinces in China that they will not sell or promote Norway as a destination, says Per-Arne Tuftin, tourism director at Innovation Norway to NRK.
The Chinese Embassy in Norway will not be interviewed by NRK and say they do not know about the new travel advice.

China gave Norway a cold shoulder after the Nobel Committee in October 2010 decided that the Chinese dissident Liu Xiabo should get the Peace Prize. On Monday(11 june) last week was former Prime Minister Kjell Magne Bondevik lead a meeting of the WCC. But Bondevik did not get a visa to visit the major power in the east.

Tsmuktengan:
Thank you for this, but this is not exactly what I meant.

I meant to ask you what are the rules for people who want to settle in natural places or in forests. Is this legal or not? Must they buy land? Should there be an authorization asked by a local administration? I don't think it is allowed to just unpack our stuff and start building up like this, especially if it is a national park.

I mean, camping would be all right, but RLNT is far more than just camping and it is about creating a permanent camp in fact for a group of people. This certainly requires legal permissions unrelated to citizenship. Do you see what I mean?

Tsanten Eywa 'eveng:

--- Quote from: Tsmuktengan on June 21, 2012, 08:34:57 pm ---Thank you for this, but this is not exactly what I meant.

I meant to ask you what are the rules for people who want to settle in natural places or in forests. Is this legal or not? Must they buy land? Should there be an authorization asked by a local administration? I don't think it is allowed to just unpack our stuff and start building up like this, especially if it is a national park.

I mean, camping would be all right, but RLNT is far more than just camping and it is about creating a permanent camp in fact for a group of people. This certainly requires legal permissions unrelated to citizenship. Do you see what I mean?

--- End quote ---

Sorry, I can't find something about that :(

I don't know where I am going to look

But, that last I posted about "permament residence permit", isn't it that what you meant?

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