Author Topic: Sutx  (Read 869 times)

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Offline Lisa

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Sutx
« on: January 13, 2011, 10:15:22 am »
I have a question about one of the definitions given for sutx.  In both the wiki vocab list and Taronyu's dictionary, sutx is defined as:

    sutx [sutʼ] (Vtr) track, follow, lock up

The definition of track and follow I think I understand, but I don't understand where lock up fits in with them.

I did a search to see if this had been clarified anywhere, but only found one other post asking this same question (among others), and I can't find any answer.

Can anyone help me understand where lock up fits in the definition?  Example sentence?  I'm really puzzled by this.   ???


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Offline Ftiafpi

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Re: Sutx
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2011, 11:08:07 am »
I actually couldn't find a good reference by googling so I'm doing this from memory, forgive me if I'm wrong.

If I recall correctly, "lock up" is an older English term that's synonymous with tracking or "having something in yours sights". It basically means you're following/tracking something. I think this is the origin of the phrase common in aerial combat, "locked on" (I.E. "I've locked onto my target.")

So, yes it does fit but it's not a common English term and don't feel bad if you were puzzled by this. Track and follow are perfectly acceptable terms, I'd just stick with those.

Offline Lisa

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Re: Sutx
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2011, 11:17:31 am »

Ah, okay, I guess that does make sense now.   :)

The first thing that came to mind when I saw lock up was secure something, as in "lock up the criminal" or "lock up the jewelry in the safe".   Quite at odds with the other two definitions.   ;D


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Oeru syaw "Tirea Ikran" kop slä frakrrmi layu oe "Grammar Skxawng"   :)

Offline Plumps

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Re: Sutx
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2011, 01:40:00 pm »
I actually couldn't find a good reference by googling so I'm doing this from memory, forgive me if I'm wrong.

If I recall correctly, "lock up" is an older English term that's synonymous with tracking or "having something in yours sights". It basically means you're following/tracking something. I think this is the origin of the phrase common in aerial combat, "locked on" (I.E. "I've locked onto my target.")

So, yes it does fit but it's not a common English term and don't feel bad if you were puzzled by this. Track and follow are perfectly acceptable terms, I'd just stick with those.

Wow, good to know. I have to change that in the translations of the dicitonary.
Thanks for the info!

Offline `Eylan Ayfalulukanä

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Re: Sutx
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2011, 03:33:23 pm »
Now, it makes sense. Another use of 'lock up' along these lines (as opposed to the very-similar-but-not-quite-the-same 'lock on') is when you have a system that employs servos. Good examples of these kinds of devices would be VTRs and all the various kinds of disk players. These devices use servos to position the video heads/optical pickup in the proper spot, and to control the speed of movement of the media (tape speed/disk RPM). Because you are dealing with electromechanical systems, it takes a finite amount of time for the servos to do their job. But when the servos have done their job are are actively controlling what they are supposed to control, they are said to be 'locked up'. Professional VTRs even have a light on the control panel that lights when the servos are locked up. This is important during editing or knowing when action can proceed once the tape is rolling. (And indeed one of the jobs I have during a production is to call out to the production people when the servos have locked. The term used to describe this is 'speed'. (I will have to use nìwin (eyawr) on the next production and see how people react  :D)

Since I am a serious VTR buff/collector, I like the definition as-is.  :) But I agree that it needs to be changed for its proper use here.

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