Learn Na'vi > Syntax / Grammar

Na'vi Linguistics: Case

<< < (2/6) > >>

omängum fra'uti:

--- Quote from: Txur’Itan on June 22, 2010, 11:20:03 pm ---Excellent post!

So are we still are uncertain of how to use -e and -an at this time I guess?  Poe and Poan still iffy, not usable as listed ASG, or are we OK with this?  ---

(14 a.) Poanìl tìng pukit nantangur He gives a book to the viperwolf.

(14 b.) Poel tìng pukit nantangur She gives a book to the viperwolf.

And topicals remain unclear for various situations?

--- End quote ---
The genders have been clear from the start, it was spelled out in the language log post from way back when.  Also spelled out was that Na'vi usually does not use them.  So unless there is a specific reason you need to clarify the gender, it usually is not necessary, and using it is probably letting the English translation leak into the Na'vi.

Txur’Itan:

--- Quote from: omängum fra'uti on June 23, 2010, 12:09:49 am ---
--- Quote from: Txur’Itan on June 22, 2010, 11:20:03 pm ---Excellent post!

So are we still are uncertain of how to use -e and -an at this time I guess?  Poe and Poan still iffy, not usable as listed ASG, or are we OK with this?  ---

(14 a.) Poanìl tìng pukit nantangur He gives a book to the viperwolf.

(14 b.) Poel tìng pukit nantangur She gives a book to the viperwolf.

And topicals remain unclear for various situations?

--- End quote ---
The genders have been clear from the start, it was spelled out in the language log post from way back when.  Also spelled out was that Na'vi usually does not use them.  So unless there is a specific reason you need to clarify the gender, it usually is not necessary, and using it is probably letting the English translation leak into the Na'vi.

--- End quote ---

Gender neutrality is an oddity for Spanish, both male and female have to be said together to make it close to neutral for gender nouns, even still the order can be construed as gender bias if one gender is said before the other.  Having Gender specificity or not having it is rather important for certain types of conversations.  Na'vi does not have grammatical Gender, that is clear, but deliberately avoiding specifying gender seems deliberately ambiguous, where so much else is so very specific.  It will take me a while to wrap my head around reasons for it being pointed out or specifically dropped being anything more than an opinion or a preference.

Kì'eyawn:

--- Quote from: Txur’Itan on June 23, 2010, 12:31:14 am ---
--- Quote from: omängum fra'uti on June 23, 2010, 12:09:49 am ---
--- Quote from: Txur’Itan on June 22, 2010, 11:20:03 pm ---Excellent post!

So are we still are uncertain of how to use -e and -an at this time I guess?  Poe and Poan still iffy, not usable as listed ASG, or are we OK with this?  ---

(14 a.) Poanìl tìng pukit nantangur He gives a book to the viperwolf.

(14 b.) Poel tìng pukit nantangur She gives a book to the viperwolf.

And topicals remain unclear for various situations?

--- End quote ---
The genders have been clear from the start, it was spelled out in the language log post from way back when.  Also spelled out was that Na'vi usually does not use them.  So unless there is a specific reason you need to clarify the gender, it usually is not necessary, and using it is probably letting the English translation leak into the Na'vi.

--- End quote ---

Gender neutrality is an oddity for Spanish, both male and female have to be said together to make it close to neutral for gender nouns, even still the order can be construed as gender bias if one gender is said before the other.  Having Gender specificity or not having it is rather important for certain types of conversations.  Na'vi does not have grammatical Gender, that is clear, but deliberately avoiding specifying gender seems deliberately ambiguous, where so much else is so very specific.  It will take me a while to wrap my head around reasons for it being pointed out or specifically dropped being anything more than an opinion or a preference.

--- End quote ---

Turkish is a genderless language that uses a single pronoun to mean he/she/it.  In the case of Turkish, the ambiguity is unavoidable—there is no other version of the pronoun.  And they seem to do okay ;)

kewnya txamew'itan:

--- Quote from: ll.sxkxawng on June 22, 2010, 08:55:19 pm ---Thee? Thy? Thou? 

--- End quote ---

No, those would be nga.


--- Quote from: Tirea Aean on June 22, 2010, 09:32:15 pm ---true. there is not a single English word that equates to Po...the closest we got is he/she. and the one it is depends on context. the most common misconception is to use po as "it" people seem to also use "fko" as "it" as well...

I like this post. I posted it on my Facebook. many others like it as well.

--- End quote ---

he/she isn't the closest, it's accurate, depending on context po can mean either. Fko as it is pretty wonky though.

wm.annis:

--- Quote from: Txur’Itan on June 22, 2010, 11:20:03 pm ---And topicals remain unclear for various situations?
--- End quote ---

If we have a sentence from Frommer containing a topical case, it's clear.  What's less clear from the few examples we have is how and when exactly we can use them on our own.  For example, in many languages the equivalent of the topical is really only used on nouns that are definite (i.e., we'd have to use "the" or some other definite marker with them in English).  Some other topic-heavy languages don't have such a requirement.  We don't know the details yet.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version